Open Roads Forum

Print  |  Close

Topic: Dually flat tire ?

Posted By: retiredgeologist on 03/06/10 07:51pm

My new to me 94 F-350 cc dually turbo IDI (took a long time to figure out not a psd) seems to have no place for a spare. There is a tire sitting in the bed but no jack. My question is if I get a flat on one of the rear dually's will it be ok to just drive it to the nearest repair site?


Posted By: Eycom on 03/06/10 08:06pm

Generally, yes it's safe to drive to a repair shop. Don't push the distance with a loaded camper in the bed and keep the speed down. My spare rides under the bed, held into place by a cable that is cranked up and down for storage or release. Don't know if that is appropo to earlier models. Check behind the rear seat for the jack.

Better yet. Carry emergency road side assistance on your insurance policy if available. Sure is nice to have someone else come out and change a tire.


RVn Full-time



Posted By: MuddyPaws1 on 03/06/10 08:24pm

You should have a cable retraced holder under the bed at the rear. There should be the required poles to drop it down under the hood. The jack is under the hood also....or at least should be.

These spare holders are a major place where preventative maintenance never happens. It needs to be dropped and lubed once a year. If this isn't done, then it jams up and will not drop the tire. Then you have to cut the cable to drop the tire. Then the spare just gets plopped in the bed.

Or the spare was removed and the previous owner just never put it back up there.

Although it may be ok to drive low speed short distance if you get a flat on the rear but what if you get one in the front? Can't drive on that.

My new to me 2000 F350 didn't come with a spare and the spare holder has a cut cable so I am disparately trying to find a spare and holder for it before my Yellowstone trip.


Posted By: BobsYourUncle on 03/06/10 10:34pm

I once drove about 300 miles on a flat outside dually. I was up north on a Sunday and all the tire shops were closed.

My truck has a rack and toolbox setup on it similar in size and weight of a TC.

I drove it home carefully and two days later took it to a tire shop for repair. They patched the tire, aired it up and it was fine - no damage to the tire.

While I was very aware I was driving on a flat, I felt no difference in handling.

So yes it can be done but it is recommended to drive straight to the nearest repair facility.


2007 GMC 3500 dually ext. cab 4X4 LBZ
Duramax / Allison
Fire Red

1997 Triple E Topaz 27' Bunkhouse TT

81 Citation 25' "Tail dragger" "Under construction"

"Workin' man's rig"

Bob's Trucks


Check Out My Rebuild Project

Project Feedback



Posted By: Matthew_B on 03/06/10 11:51pm

With a '94, it would have been before the cable crank system. The tire sat on a cross channel held by two bolts. The forward one had deforming threads so it wouldn't ever loosen. The back one had an eye in it that the stock tire iron could turn to lower the tire. Once it was dropped about 1", the cross channel could be unhooked from the eye bolt. If you truck has the chassis cab fuel tank under the back you can't fit a spare under there. You'd know it because the fuel tank will be 54 gallons instead of 19,

The jack was under the hood behind the radiator overflow / windshield washer reservoirs on the passenger side. When the jack was screwed down it also held in the tire iron. If you don't study how the jack goes in before you remove it, you'll have a devil of a time figuring out how to get it back in place. The jack operating crank ran across the top of the radiator.

If you don't have any of that, I'd suggest hitting a junkyard and restoring the equipment your truck came with.

As far as running on a flat rear: Keep the speed under 40 and limit the distance and you can run on one tire.






Posted By: FF1063 on 03/07/10 07:00am

++++++

* This post was edited 07/13/10 07:41pm by FF1063 *


Posted By: DianneOK on 03/07/10 08:35am

Quote:

The jack was under the hood behind the radiator overflow / windshield washer reservoirs on the passenger side. When the jack was screwed down it also held in the tire iron. If you don't study how the jack goes in before you remove it, you'll have a devil of a time figuring out how to get it back in place. The jack operating crank ran across the top of the radiator.


Boy, does that bring back memories ....me, the loaded stock trailer full of cattle, the dually and....a flat

Fortunately a wonderfully nice guy came by and changed the tire...it was the outside right, and I found a wide spot on the road. I would not have wanted to drive 35 miles down the mountain with a live load in that trailer Nor was dropping the trailer and proceeding with just the truck an option.......


After that incident we got a bottle jack.......and stored it in the back seat area along with the tools of my trade ..ropes, halters, etc.....


Dianne (and Terry) (Fulltimed for 9 years)
Donnelly, ID
HAM WB6N (Terry)
2012 Ford F350, diesel, 4x4 SRW, crew cab, longbed
2009 Lance 971 Truck Camper, loaded


Life Member Good Sam
Geocache..."RVcachers"
RV net Blog

Camping, nature's way to feed the mosquitoes



Posted By: bobndot on 03/07/10 09:21am

RichieC wrote:

What about keeping one of those "Spare in a Can" thingies?
And a small compressor.

Any thoughts?


Some people do that. I carry an air comp. with a 12v. extention cord so it will reach the rear wheels as well as my trailer tires.
In an emergency, i can see using a can of spare tire inflator. I have heard that it might throw off the wheel balance , so you might have to have the tire shop clean it out.
I also carry an 8 ton bottle jack as an additional jack. Im not sure if the stock jack alone will lift the truck with the camper on it. I use two jacks just to be safe.
I did have one other problem when i had a flat . I could not get the tire off the hub, it was frozen onto the hub . I sprayed it but was afraid to crawl under the truck and strike it with a hammer while the camper was on it. I used a 8 ft. length of 2x3 and a H.D. hammer to knock the tire off the hub. That allowed me to knock off the tire without crawling under the truck.
Make sure the spare tire hand crank port can be accessed with the camper on the truck , otherwise you will have to raise the camper up to access the crank port by the rear bumper . It might be easier for some people to carry the tire on a front rack , like 'sleepy' does.


Posted By: MuddyPaws1 on 03/07/10 09:32am

bobndot wrote:


I did have one other problem when i had a flat . I could not get the tire off the hub, it was frozen onto the hub . I sprayed it but was afraid to crawl under the truck and strike it with a hammer while the camper was on it. I used a 8 ft. length of 2x3 and a H.D. hammer to knock the tire off the hub. That allowed me to knock off the tire without crawling under the truck.
Make sure the spare tire hand crank port can be accessed with the camper on the truck , otherwise you will have to raise the camper up to access the crank port by the rear bumper . It might be easier for some people to carry the tire on a front rack , like 'sleepy' does.



One of the things I do as a maintenance item is remove the wheels, clean up the hubs and apply anti-seize to them. I have been in that situation before and as a tech I have seen some that were so stuck that it took a torch to get them off. Not what I want on the road.

And accessing the port with the camper on is something I didn't think about. There is no way I would be able to access mine. Thanks for that tip. This is my first TC that I actually will be taking places. Never had to worry about it with the TT or pop up.


Posted By: Matthew_B on 03/07/10 11:20pm

I've heard of people have concerns about the stock jack before and I don't know why.

I've had a flat on my flatbed trailer. The trailer weighed in at 14,000 lbs when I had a flat. I was able to jack the trailer up using the truck jack. I was real careful to stay clear in case it collapsed, but the jack took it just fine.


Posted By: 88lover on 03/08/10 08:33am

Duallys are really hard to keep inflated. I usually keep 80 lbs but reciently I loaded the camper to move it around the yard and noticed that one tire seemed low. When i checked I had 20 on the inside tire and 60 on the outside tire.

I have extenders on the tires but they are so flexable, It is difficult for me to hold the extender in one hand and the air port in the other. The extenders had a bracket when I bought them from CW but it did not fit my wheels.

I wish there was a better system available that would not break the bank.






Posted By: christopherglenn on 03/08/10 03:02pm

the big danger of driving on a flat, is if it breaks the bead, if an inner, it can wrap around the brakes, springs, and take out the bed/fender, if the outer, it can take off down the road without you. The heavier the load the more likely you break a bead..


2007 Chevrolet 3500 CC/LB Duramax/Dually 4X4 Mine r4tech, Reese Signature Series 18k +slider, duratrac, Titan 62 gallon, diamond eye, Cheetah 64
2011 Keystone Fusion 405 TrailAir & Triglide, Centerpoint, gen-turi, 3 PVX-840T, XANTREX FREEDOM SW3012, G614



Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 03/08/10 03:14pm

Get a flat on one dually tire and drive on the other one, its time to replace both. You've just overloaded the other tire for an extended period and now it may no longer be structurally sound to continue bearing load at freeway speeds.


My Blog - The Journey of the Redneck Express
CB Channel 17 Redneck Express
'1992 Dodge W-250 "Dually" Power Wagon - Club Cab Long Bed 4x4 V8 5.9L gashog w/4.10 Geared axles
'1974 KIT Kamper 1106 - 11' Slide-in
'2006 Heartland BigHorn 3400RL



Posted By: bighatnohorse on 03/07/10 08:44am

What about keeping one of those "Spare in a Can" thingies?
And a small compressor.

Any thoughts?


2008 Arctic Fox 1140 model
Truckless in Seattle
The NEW Eagle Cap Owners group


Posted By: wp6529 on 03/08/10 04:10pm

JoeChiOhki wrote:

Get a flat on one dually tire and drive on the other one, its time to replace both. You've just overloaded the other tire for an extended period and now it may no longer be structurally sound to continue bearing load at freeway speeds.


That is only true if it happens when you are fully loaded. If the bed is empty or minimally loaded it's no different than a SRW configuration and the tire is still within it's safe load limits.

The stock tire ratings for F350 DRW tires are 2,910# @ 80 PSI.

The unloaded weight on the rear axle for a CC, LB w/ 6.4 is 3,680# (8,740# total, 5,060# on the front axle).

If you are down to just one tire on each side, you still can handle 5,820# on the rear axle without exceeding the tire rating, which still allows 2,140# of additional cargo weight on the rear axle.

Obviously if you have changed tires or wheels, or have different options on the truck the numbers will be a little different, but you still have substantial capacity even when reduced to SRW config.


Posted By: JoeChiOhki on 03/08/10 06:09pm

wp6529 wrote:

JoeChiOhki wrote:

Get a flat on one dually tire and drive on the other one, its time to replace both. You've just overloaded the other tire for an extended period and now it may no longer be structurally sound to continue bearing load at freeway speeds.


That is only true if it happens when you are fully loaded. If the bed is empty or minimally loaded it's no different than a SRW configuration and the tire is still within it's safe load limits.

The stock tire ratings for F350 DRW tires are 2,910# @ 80 PSI.

The unloaded weight on the rear axle for a CC, LB w/ 6.4 is 3,680# (8,740# total, 5,060# on the front axle).

If you are down to just one tire on each side, you still can handle 5,820# on the rear axle without exceeding the tire rating, which still allows 2,140# of additional cargo weight on the rear axle.

Obviously if you have changed tires or wheels, or have different options on the truck the numbers will be a little different, but you still have substantial capacity even when reduced to SRW config.


Yup, I was assuming the discussion involved a tire failure while under way with the Camper.


Posted By: wp6529 on 03/08/10 07:13pm

JoeChiOhki wrote:

wp6529 wrote:

JoeChiOhki wrote:

Get a flat on one dually tire and drive on the other one, its time to replace both. You've just overloaded the other tire for an extended period and now it may no longer be structurally sound to continue bearing load at freeway speeds.


That is only true if it happens when you are fully loaded. If the bed is empty or minimally loaded it's no different than a SRW configuration and the tire is still within it's safe load limits.

The stock tire ratings for F350 DRW tires are 2,910# @ 80 PSI.

The unloaded weight on the rear axle for a CC, LB w/ 6.4 is 3,680# (8,740# total, 5,060# on the front axle).

If you are down to just one tire on each side, you still can handle 5,820# on the rear axle without exceeding the tire rating, which still allows 2,140# of additional cargo weight on the rear axle.

Obviously if you have changed tires or wheels, or have different options on the truck the numbers will be a little different, but you still have substantial capacity even when reduced to SRW config.


Yup, I was assuming the discussion involved a tire failure while under way with the Camper.


My camper is about 2,000# and some of that weight ends up on the front axle, so I'd survive in SRW mode in a pinch.


Posted By: 5Alive on 03/08/10 08:11pm

I've done it twice. First time was driving home from when I bought it about 350 miles. Had an inside tire down to 10psi, but truck was empty. No tire shops open. No ill effects. Second time was on the way camping on a rough dirt road and BOOM. Large rock hole, inside tire again. I had maybe 1000 lbs in the back and wanted to make it to my campsite and not fight changing a tire in that spot. My max speed would only be about 25, for another 25 miles of dirt so I just kept going. Other than the original rock hole there were no other problems when I changed to the spare in the campsite. I always tell people having a dually is like having three spares.


1995 Weekender 1010 Ext
2005 Dodge Ram 3500 DRW 4X4 CTD Regular cab



Posted By: wnjj on 03/08/10 08:18pm

MuddyPaws1 wrote:

Although it may be ok to drive low speed short distance if you get a flat on the rear but what if you get one in the front? Can't drive on that.


Pull a rear one off and put it on the front. My uncle did that when his Freightliner lost a front tire once.


Print  |  Close