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 > Your search for posts made by 'FastEagle' found 351 matches.

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RE: new tires

Hi, as you can see from my profile I have a 2012 Ford f150 supercrew, pulling a 2011 Jayco 256 RKS. I know I can go to a tire store and get all sorts of recommendations as to what I should buy but you guys are the best road test there is and I have never been steered wrong yet. I need new tires, they are currently P275/65R18. What would you recommend, the trailer loaded is about 6600 lbs. Thanks If you're not overloading your truck's payload there's no reason to change to something that may provide a more uncomfortable ride. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/21/14 09:27am Travel Trailers
RE: Equivalent Tire Size

ST205/75R14 is follows the standard tire sizing in the US. I'm not sure what the 195R14C would be besides maybe and LT truck tire load C. Take a look at this trailer tire vs. passenger tire info too. Your local tire shop should stock and be able to order trailer tires for your original size. I specifically wanted the Maxxis M8008 and ordered through my local Discount Tire store. Currently all Kumho 14" tire sizes are LRD. The C following the tire size above denotes it as a commercial tire. Kumho has approved all 14" sizes as suitable for trailer service. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/21/14 09:14am Travel Trailers
RE: Wanting to change from STs to LTs..........

Firestone Transforce = fabric carcass Bridgestone Duravis R-250 = all steel carcass commercial tire Bridgestone M895 = all steel ply carcass commercial tire. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/20/14 10:39am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Wanting to change from STs to LTs..........

If you’re going to use LT tires as replacements maybe you should stick to a more narrow tire with a little more load capacity than you already have. Here is a reference for something more practical. Other manufacturers build this sized tire. Notice in the reference that the measuring rim was 6”. That means all the dimensions are figured on that fitment. As others have noted, zero off-set is required for RV trailer fitments. Click Here! FastEagle
FastEagle 07/17/14 02:02pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: My tire story - Big O tires

Every major light truck tire manufacturer that I’ve researched disallow replacing original equipment special trailer tires with their light truck tires. Don’t take my word for it, do some researching. When reading tire warranties look at the heading “what is not covered”. The key word is “misapplication”. More and more tire retailers are just not going to take on the responsibility of what is considered a misapplication. Of course, tires approved and touted as trailer tires by their manufacturers are suitable to replace ST tires. The Goodyear G614, Kumho 857 or Hankook RA08 are a few of them. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/16/14 08:44am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Powerking Towmax ST235/80R16

Then why do ST tires have "For Trailer Use Only" molded on the sidewall? Lyle For the same reason the earlier Goodyear G614s did. It's what their designed for. FE
FastEagle 07/11/14 01:57pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Trailer tire ratings?

We just bought a 2012 Keystone Cougar XLite 26SAB (6900#). The original owner, a US Air Force veteran who took immaculate care of the rig, has the original tires on the rig and told me they only have about 7,000 miles on them from one cross country trip. I haven't looked at them closely let, but we're going to put about 1,000 - 1,200 miles on them at the end of July and I'm wondering if I need to spend the money now for new tires or wait until our first full season next spring. Any thoughts are appreciated and I'll update this post once I've closely inspected the tires and found out their manufacturing location. Special Trailer (ST) tires are in a class of their own. It’s very difficult to compare them with other tires because of their differences in construction and durability. Owners of RV trailers fitted with ST tires - a very high percentage - seldom know about the pitfalls of ST tires until they have a failure. Because they look like the tires on your car, truck, SUV, etc. doesn’t mean they’re going last as long or be as durable as those other tires. However, they will often provide the service they are advertised for when operated within the parameters their manufacturers have defined for normal usage. ST tires on a new or new to the owner trailer have often been abused. The new ones in transport from the factory to the dealer location and then by the dealer in not properly maintaining them while in their care. Previously owned trailer tires may have had similar treatment. If you don’t trust anything else a tire manufacturer tells you about their product you need to learn that when they say ST tires are only good for 3-5 years they are telling it like it is. The very nature of service on the tall RV trailers and the construction of the ST tire causes them to degrade rapidly. As they lose load capacity their normal running temperatures will increase. Pretty soon there is not enough load capacity to carry your trailer and tread separations start. It’s being destroyed from within. It’s very discouraging to have a tire failure when it looks like new. It’s just as discouraging to change tires because of age when they don’t show much wear. Changing to tires with different designs is often difficult and also frowned upon by manufacturers of the other designs. Mainly because the other designs don’t have enough load capacity to replace the ST tire or it’s considered a misapplication by the other designs manufacturers. Bottom line; Find a ST tire manufacturer that tells you all about their safe operating parameters. Carlisle Tire has all the information in print and easily found on the internet. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/11/14 09:58am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Powerking Towmax ST235/80R16

ST tire manufacturers are not monitored the way passenger carrying tires are monitored. Chris Could you expand on that? I'm not sure what that statement means. All tires with the "DOT" certification molded into their sidewalls are "monitored" in the same fashion. And, you know as well as I do that all DOT certified tires for highway service can carry passengers. FE
FastEagle 07/10/14 11:06am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Powerking Towmax ST235/80R16

ST manufacturers have even gone to the point of literally over-stamping tires with =higher= load ratings, right across the old stamp on the tire, so they can "legally" be used on heavier trailers. Lyle I'd like to see a picture of that or some other proof of that practice. FE
FastEagle 07/09/14 11:00am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Trailer tire ratings?

Our new fiver will have a max loaded weight of 12,500. What tire rating should we be looking for on this trailer. If it isn't the "best", how long should we wait before replacing them? We mostly snowbird and sit for several weeks, with a few short trips in the summer. Thanks for any input. All RV trailers have a federal certification label. It’s found on the forward LH external portion of the trailer in full view. On it you will find the size of the original equipment tires, rims and the air pressure needed for the tires. When upgrading from the OE tires you should look for something equal to the OE tires in size and load capacity. Larger is often better. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/08/14 01:28pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Powerking Towmax ST235/80R16

I purchased a "new" 2012 Keystone Alpine 3650RL in June 2013 from Camping World Bartow. It came with 4 Powerking Towmax tires dated 3811, meaning manufactured the 38th month, 2011. In April 2014, we experienced 3 separate blowouts within 50 miles, good highway conditions. The tires had less than 4,000 miles. The tire pressures were checked at 80 psi before departure. The first blowout, the tread separated from the tire and wrapped around the axle and did damage to the passenger side of the 5er. The other two blowouts did minimal damage. After the 1st and 2nd blowouts, we stopped at Camping World Ft Myers for repair of a severed hydraulic line. After camping there overnight we proceeded to the campground less than 15 miles. Enroute we had the 3rd blowout. We ended up changing all 4 tires. We dropped the 5er off at CW for the repairs on return. We contacted USAA with the claim. They, in turn, assigned the claim to TBC Corp for validation and inspection. The claim was OK'ed and USAA paid the $3,700 damages less the $250 deductible. The manufacturer, Dynamic Tire Corp, Canada, was contacted because of the tire failure. They arranged for shipping to their location for inspection. After some time, their analysis, as suspected was "pilot error". Their analysis was an overload condition, improper tire inflation and extreme heat. No manufacturer descrepancies were found. However, they did offer a "goodwill gesture" of $375 for a general release of liability. Their analysis is wrong. The tires were checked before departure at 80 psi and the 5er was loaded to the less than the manual specifications. It's another case of poor Chinese quality that we hear time and again. My analysis is poor Chinese quality, 5er was stored at CW Bartow for better than a year with minimal movement, Keystone put the optimum tire on a "luxury" rv for it's weight, the tires were "E" rated which technically is adequate. Discussion with experienced people indicate a "G" rated tire would be better(but cost more). I think the fault lies with the tire manufacturer, Keystone and Camping World Bartow, which was in a transition mode with the purchase of Dusty's RV. I think Camping World should take a look at their operation at Bartow. It's poor and not customer oriented. The Ft Myers operation is 100% better. The CDN tire people probably did a fair analysis of the failed tires. They didn’t say you caused the conditions for the failures. They just said that those conditions contributed to the tires demise. The facts - as you have presented them - show that the tires were somewhere around two years old when you started using them. The previous usage conditions are unknown to you. They could have a lot more mileage on them than you have any knowledge of. The fact that they failed so close together would indicate their damage was equally accumulated and distributed. So, you got the minimum life expectancy out of them, three years. Your axles have moist likely been derated from 7000# to 6750# to allow for the fitment of the ST235/80R16E tires. IMO that’s not enough load capacity for your trailer. Any tires providing 3750# of load capacity or above would be much better. Does your owner’s manual have options for LRG tires? You don’t really need it as long as the LRG tires are certified for trailer axle fitments. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/07/14 07:02pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: ST tires recalled

Typically, replacement tires chosen for necessity - replacing a failed tire on the roadside - will result in a tire not being registered. Unregistered tires will not get recall information from their manufacturer. Tires changed at home are seldom registered. Without sending in the registration forms an owner is outside of the information circle. The reference in the original post above provides a point of contact for those seeking information about the recalled tires and how to file a claim. FE
FastEagle 07/07/14 09:59am Fifth-Wheels
ST tires recalled

I was traveling when this came out and forgot to post it. Sorry for the duplication if someone else has posted it. Click here FastEagle
FastEagle 07/07/14 08:48am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Tire Repalcements

WOW !!! I didn't realize I would start a war on a simple question about tires for the trailer. Thanks for every ones opinion and ideas, I think we will go for the use of LT tires, and stay away from "Trailer tires". Wise choice in the long run. The war has been going on for a long time with the usual culprits :) Culprits = a person who is responsible for a crime or other misdeed. An unworthy word for a friendly tire thread discussion. FE
FastEagle 07/06/14 08:05am Travel Trailers
RE: Tire Repalcements

During the past ten years or more, many of the RV trailer manufacturers have experimented with providing Light Truck (LT) tires as original equipment for numerous models. There have not been any explanations why they quit. Some of them were installed on 6000# axles with a small margin of excess load capacity available. Their life expectancy and failure rates - as reported on RV trailer tire forums - mirrored that of the ST tires on the same sized axles. You can research threads for NuWa, Heartland and Keystone products to confirm my findings. I don’t think the big guys in the tire industry liked having all those unsatisfactory reviews and may have just quit providing them for the RV trailer industry. Some of the new Airstream TTs are being equipped with LT tires. I don’t know if the tire manufacturer (Michelin) is supporting that fitment or not. Seems to me that they will support the trailer manufacturers decision to use them and provide warranty coverage for those tires that are installed as OE. I don’t think it can be classified as a misapplication to use them on trailer axles if the trailer manufacturer put them on there. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/05/14 10:39pm Travel Trailers
RE: Tire Repalcements

Here is a quiz : Which tire is likely to be a better tire ? Tire One 225/75R15 load range D diameter = 28.3" x 8.8 " section width Max speed rating 65 mph Tire weight = 31 # Made in China Cost is $ 89 each OR Tire Two The 225/70R15 Load Range D diameter = 27.4" x 9 " section width Max speed rating 106 mph tire weight is 33 # Made in Germany Cost is $ 156 each Both tires are made by the same manufacturer . Both tires use the same wheel and fit in the same space under the trailer . What's the point of the question if those selections are replacing like sized OE tires? FE
FastEagle 07/05/14 07:18pm Travel Trailers
RE: Tire Repalcements

All my trailers run LT, of various brands. And are approved by the trailer manufacturers. I use three different brands of LT tires on my RV and equipment trailers/tri axle stock trailer and have a registered with those companies with full warranty from their mfg. Than I would say that those tires have some sort of vehicle manufacturer support for fitment onto your trailers axles. FE
FastEagle 07/05/14 07:16pm Travel Trailers
RE: Tire Repalcements

My DW's 1/2 ton Chevrolet tire tag, on the door, only lists 'P' tires. And yet I see time after time posters telling others to put LT tires on their 1/2 ton truck. Now the manufacturer may recommend that you don't, but is that an absolute? It’s an industry problem. The automotive portion of the tire industry have recommendations from the vehicle builders for approved replacement tires for your truck. There are no such documents for the RV trailer industry. Tire manufacturers write a lot of “industry standard” SOPs in their maintenance manuals but do not info the source because a lot of the Tire & Rim Association material is confidential. Tire retailers specializing in automotive industry tires are not fully aware of some of the more important differences it RV trailer tire fitments. RV trailer manufacturers tie their own hands when it comes to recommending replacement tires for OE tires. If they did not do it initially and write it into the vehicle owner’s manual they just don’t seem to know what to do when asked to deviate. If they wont make a decision to help an owner make approved replacements the owner then has to use the same tires as the trailer manufacturer provided or go out on a limb and take on the responsibility for unapproved replacements. If any LT tire manufacturer disapproves their tires for replacing Original Equipment (OE) ST tires, all of the responsibility for such changes will revert back to the installer making such disapproved changes. If a tire retailer makes unapproved replacements, make sure your trailer’s VIN number gets on the bill of sale. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/05/14 01:04pm Travel Trailers
RE: Goodyear tire pre-mature blowouts/tread seperation

You can go to your closest Goodyear dealer and get copies of the necessary forms. When you file the forms you have to turn-in what remains of the failed tire. It then becomes the property of Goodyear. FastEagle
FastEagle 07/05/14 11:12am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Tire Repalcements

I have mentioned a point in the past , " st " tires have printed on the sidewall " trailer service only" LT and P tires dont have a warning saying dont use on a trailer , or truck use only . So? ST tires are designed by their manufacturers for a specific function and are certified by the DOT to perform that function in highway service. Some LT tires, such as the GY G614 also have ""for trailer service only" molded into their sidewalls. Passenger tires MUST have their load capacity derated by 10% for service on trucks, multi passenger vans and RV trailers. They are also limited to service on vehicles less than 10,000#. Tire rules are periodically updated. The current documents were changed in 2007 and updated for correctness annually. FastEagle On edit; "Light truck tire means a tire designated by its manufacturer as primarily intended for use on lightweight trucks or multipurpose passenger vehicles." Quoted from 571.119.
FastEagle 07/05/14 09:26am Travel Trailers
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