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 > Your search for posts made by 'valhalla360' found 610 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: All these questions on routing???

The people who use it as a search for directions confuse me. For easier to use a mapping site. Others ask about campsites and places to see and that makes sense as you are asking a group of similar minded people. The use of GPS is another matter. I've taken to using it even when commuting to the work. While I know perfectly well how to get to the office along with alternate routes, the GPS will tell me if there is a crash or backup on my usual route and suggest alternatives. Having driven a few times in Europe, the GPS is even more important as once you leave the freeways, the roads seem to follow ancient wagon tracks that meander with little rhyme or reason. In the USA, even most secondary arterials follow predictable patterns (yeah there are exceptions).
valhalla360 01/24/15 07:28am Roads and Routes
RE: Leaving seat while driving

People do it all the time. In a crash with a semi, you will lose. In a crash with a passenger car, odds are you win. Google "top gear motor home race" to see how they hold up in a crash.
valhalla360 01/24/15 07:22am Class A Motorhomes
RE: 5th wheel weights vs tongue.

1680lb payload: - 200lb hitch - 200lb cargo in the truck (I'm being generous as I've yet to see a 5th wheel pull in with the truck completely empty. That leaves around 1280lbs for pin weight. Assuming 20%, that allows for around a 6000lb 5th wheel...except.... That's the fully loaded weight, remove 1000-1500lbs and you are down to around a 4500-5000lb 5th wheel if you look at the dry weight. (run the numbers as some 5th wheels are closer to 25% pin weight reducing the available size substantially. Also, you will be very limited on other things you can carry in the truck.) There are some very small 5th wheels (mostly older used models) but your selection will be limited.
valhalla360 01/24/15 07:19am Fifth-Wheels
RE: 1500 Towable Fifth Wheel

If you want to go by the book, you can't increase the 1625lb payload. If you try anyway, make sure to look at everything (tires, rims, axles, springs, etc...) Air bags will level the load but everything else is still over capacity) After subtracing a couple hundred lbs for the hitch and probably another few hundred for misc cargo in the truck, you are probably looking at less than 1000lbs capacity available to handle the pin weight. That would be a tiny 5th wheel. Figure around 20-25% of the 5th wheel as pin weight for a starting figure. You also have to be careful with toy haulers if you tow without the 1600lbs of motorcycle in the back as a counter weight, you might be adding 800-1000lbs to the pin weight.
valhalla360 01/23/15 02:44pm Toy Haulers
RE: Inverter generators (power in the paddock)

2 units are a mixed blessing, easier to move but more effort to maintain. Since you already have one I would lean towards a second matching unit. We have a single yamaha 2400 that we use. If you didn't have the honda already, I would suggest something in the 2400-3000watt range depending on your ability to lift and move the unit.
valhalla360 01/23/15 02:38pm General RVing Issues
RE: Tankless Hot Water System

Electric or propane? - Electric needs a lot of juice or if lower wattage you have the choice of low flow or hot water. - Propane can put out lots of hot water but venting safely can be tricky (is it aftermarket or original equipement?)
valhalla360 01/23/15 02:36pm General RVing Issues
RE: 50% less from what you paid

I never bought an RV as an investment,I buy for the freedom of going when i want, where i want, no bed bugs, we buy when we find a coach that fulfills our needs.and then we keep it . I just found our 2nd MH,it took me about a year of looking,It will be our last.When we get ready to Stop The RV life Im not going to care what Its worth.I never buy from a Dealer. No it's not an investement but if you understand how much you lose to buy that "new car smell", you can save a ton of money.
valhalla360 01/23/15 02:32pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 50% less from what you paid

10-20% lost when you drove off the lot (he can't sell it as new anymore) 10-20% lost when you sell to a dealer (there has to be room in the deal to make some profit) 20-40% lost due to 4yrs of wear & tear and overall age. 50% off from the dealer is probably doing well. Eventually the price levels out (maybe 10-15yrs old) when value is a function of it's underlying capability as opposed to marketability.
valhalla360 01/23/15 09:00am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Made for your half ton truck ;-)

From what I've read about the 2015 F-150, it really is a "F-100", which is what Ford might have made a few years back, a pickup 90% the size of a F-150, mainly aimed at keeping the company within CAFE standards. What people don't realize is that the EPA and CAFE standards force auto makers to have to go with lighter weight vehicles to save weight and boost average MPG scores... for most vehicles, it isn't an issue... The F-150 is still a decent truck... but it is intended to be a grocery-getter with occasional forays off-road, or be used with a boat or camper in tow. Ford had to make a lot of compromises with it so it would still be a usable truck... but keep the EPA off their back. Disclaimer: I bought a F-150, and even though it is an excellent everyday commute vehicle... I do regret the fact that it can't be used in any real way for anything other than a pull-behind. While CAFE standards are driving a lot of the changes, this is the first I've heard that it is a 90% 1/2 ton. My understanding was similarly equiped, it actually had better cargo capaicity because less of the suspension capabilities are used to hold up the empty truck.
valhalla360 01/23/15 08:53am Truck Campers
RE: Do you leave your diesel running ...?

Big Wheels a Rollin Movin' On... Big rig wannabe. All six of my diesels EGT were cooled to safe shut off temps by the time I coasted down the off ramps and eased into a station or positioned our trailer in it's camp site or parked at the house. If I had just pulled up a 6% grade and pulled into a scenic overlook, I would let the engine idle a couple of minutes gas or diesel. Other that that type of scenario, it's just chest puffing. Bingo. By the time you ease down the off ramp and pull into an adjacent gas station, it's likely had the 3-5min of cool down.
valhalla360 01/21/15 05:12pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Made for your half ton truck ;-)

What's expected of Joe Everyman, and what Joe Everyman expects, are two completely different things. Joe Everyman goes into this expecting to put his truck to work doing something useful, not to be told that he has to take a huge hit on the value of his current truck by trading it in on something more capable. Joe Everyman does not know what questions to ask, and does not even realize that weight is a factor. It doesn't help that the salesman calmly reassures Joe that his truck can haul anything. Being stupid has always been expensive. If joe everyman doesn't bother to understand how things work, that's stupid and likely will be an expensive lesson.
valhalla360 01/21/15 05:56am Truck Campers
RE: SHOWER DOMES

...traps a layer of air that helps insulate.I wonder how that stink bug got in between the inner and outer dome in my NEW 2015? My guess it is more cosmetic than functional...JMHO Trapping a layer doesn't mean it's perfectly sealed. While perfectly sealed is more efficient, it is much harder to accomplish. Even partially sealed will be far more efficient than a single layer.
valhalla360 01/21/15 05:53am General RVing Issues
RE: SHOWER DOMES

I would not be comfortable with a single layer. What if the outer one gets broken or damaged? Just a thought Then you have water ingress into the roof (ie: bad thing). As others have said, it's about insulation value.
valhalla360 01/20/15 07:03am General RVing Issues
RE: Made for your half ton truck ;-)

Just a thought, but not all 1/2 tons (or any other truck for that mater) are created equal. If you bring up the 2014 F150 the TC rating goes from around 1,400# to 2,600# depending upon options. The F250 is 1,500# to 3,800#. When manufactures look at these numbers that's all they need to see to start their advertising campaigns. The box aka bed is a standard size for the F150, F250 and F350. Just pick long or short. No doubt it's a matter of picking the truck configuration with the maximum payload capacity to "prove" your claim. "See? There is an F150 out there with enough payload capacity to haul this camper!" Technically the manufacturers are being HONEST, but they're not being entirely TRUTHFUL. The problem is those trucks are far and few between. There are far more trucks with payloads in the 1500lb range than the 2600lb range in the F150. Average Joe Everyman wants to load the camper on *HIS* truck, not to have to search far and wide for a specific truck, or special order one. Joe Everyman has always been expected to check the weight ratings. Again, since everything up to 550 rating has the same bed the presumption that if it fits the bed it's a 1/2ton unit is false.
valhalla360 01/20/15 06:54am Truck Campers
RE: All electric no propane needed

Two possibilities if they aren't counting on you using a generator regularly (and it would be stupid to eliminate the propane system if they expect you to run the generator all the time: - They expect to be in parks with 50amp hookups all the time. - They expect you to use electricity very sparingly. Even with a generator or 50amp hook up, heating will be an issue if you get into any seriously cold weather.
valhalla360 01/19/15 08:02am General RVing Issues
RE: Made for your half ton truck ;-)

Considering the biggest baddest camper for a 1 ton dually will fit in a 1/2 ton long bed, your theory has a big hole in it.
valhalla360 01/17/15 04:12pm Truck Campers
RE: 2WD vs. 4WD

Another thing to think about, if your truck is your daily driver, is how well it works as a daily driver. As a daily driver a 3/4 and 1 ton are worse in nearly every single way compared to a half ton. They're bigger, less fuel efficent, they ride significantly worse, are harder to park, and have slower acceleration and longer braking when unloaded. While they may be better the 10 days a year that you tow, they will be worse the other 355 days. Technically because of the increase in stopping distance and decrease in acceleration, a 3/4 or 1 ton truck is less likely to avoid an accident that you may have been able to avoid in a half ton. Similarly equipped trucks, a 3/4 takes 10-15 ft longer to stop from 60 mph. So they're safer 10 days a year, and less safe the other 355 days. Ride in both and compare. My Hemi Ram 1500 rides great, my cousins hemi ram 2500 rides horrible. No question, if you're buying a vehicle just to tow, the 3/4 or 1 ton is hands down the better choice. It's not as easy to argue if it's meant to be daily driven. Other than a stiffer ride almost none of those downsides are real. Fuel efficency with a big engine is lousy in both. The overall length and turning ability are not significantly different (assumes same cab and bed configuration). With the big engines, the both have good acceleration when not towing and the heavier duty trucks have larger brakes. Yes they have larger brakes but the trucks themselves are much heavier, their stopping distances are increased, check out the #'s on them. You'll find across the board farther stopping distances. Even with larger engines, they are slower to accelerate, again check out the #'s....and that's if they have the diesel option. Ram and Chevy both have less powerful gas engines in their 2500 than they do their 1500s. Which puts their gas equivalent even slower yet. Most people on this forum are quick to reccomend a one ton to to someone as a daily driver. That person may tow only a handful of days a year. That one ton has a lower crash rating, worse ride, harder to park, higher maintenance and registration fees, worse fuel economy, ect ect. Yes they're awesome if they're dedicated for towing. Daily driving one just isn't as practical as a half ton, and even they are a compromise compared to many other vehicles. You appear focused on the ego points. If you are taking them out to a track day, I would agree there is a slight edge for the 1/2 ton (even better for a small PU by the way) but since the vast majority of people don't race thier tow vehicles the point is the numbers are really very similar. The standard V8 has plenty of power to get them moving at a brisk pace when empty. I don't think I've ever felt the need to put the pedal more than 1/2way down when not towing in the 3/4tons I've owned and yet that has always been plenty of power to get up to speed. Fuel efficency with similar power packages are about the same. Braking isn't much different as your charts show (less than 10% variation). Having driven both over the years, the one noticable difference is the ride is much stiffer. If you are sensitive, it might bother you. The other possible edge though not as much as it used to be is 1/2 tons used to sit lower to the ground making them easier to get in and out of. More recently it seems the 1/2 ton trucks sit higher apparently to look more like the bigger trucks. A minor point of interest: In the one graph, the Chevy and GMC have different results. As everyone knows, the only difference between the trucks is the badges. That leads me to believe that they did not ensure the tests were between equivilently outfitted trucks or the test has significant variability that isn't being accounted for. If you read the test the GMC and Chevy had different tires and slightly different options, giving them different weights and braking. Which would account for the difference. So no, the difference is not just badges. No ego, just facts. Safety is a big issue for me. If youre daily driving, the smallest truck that can safely (key word safely) do the job may be safer the rest of the year. I see accidents all the time that 10ft is the difference between an accident and no accident. Sure real world is different than a track test, but regardless a 3/4 takes longer to stop on a track and in the real world. Also non-track related, some 3/4 models have lower crash test rating than their half ton counterparts. So in other words, they aren't comparing trucks that are outfitted identically so there is no reason to believe they are comparing apples to apples when looking between 1/2 ton vs 3/4 ton trucks and the graphs are thus meaningless. Even so, far too much variability shown to suggest a meaninful conclusion.
valhalla360 01/16/15 10:58am Beginning RVing
RE: Highway Safety Ratings

Search: Top Gear Motorhome Race. Watch the videos and tell me if you would want to be sitting in the john going down the highway at 60mph when you get into a crash. As others have said they don't test them. The bus conversions are probably your best bet but you pay for it.
valhalla360 01/15/15 01:21pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: RV on a ship

I know a couple who did this on the Amazon. Lived in thier class C, no hassles about propane being shut off. I suspect the safety rules are a little different in Alaska.
valhalla360 01/15/15 01:17pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: 2WD vs. 4WD

Another thing to think about, if your truck is your daily driver, is how well it works as a daily driver. As a daily driver a 3/4 and 1 ton are worse in nearly every single way compared to a half ton. They're bigger, less fuel efficent, they ride significantly worse, are harder to park, and have slower acceleration and longer braking when unloaded. While they may be better the 10 days a year that you tow, they will be worse the other 355 days. Technically because of the increase in stopping distance and decrease in acceleration, a 3/4 or 1 ton truck is less likely to avoid an accident that you may have been able to avoid in a half ton. Similarly equipped trucks, a 3/4 takes 10-15 ft longer to stop from 60 mph. So they're safer 10 days a year, and less safe the other 355 days. Ride in both and compare. My Hemi Ram 1500 rides great, my cousins hemi ram 2500 rides horrible. No question, if you're buying a vehicle just to tow, the 3/4 or 1 ton is hands down the better choice. It's not as easy to argue if it's meant to be daily driven. Other than a stiffer ride almost none of those downsides are real. Fuel efficency with a big engine is lousy in both. The overall length and turning ability are not significantly different (assumes same cab and bed configuration). With the big engines, the both have good acceleration when not towing and the heavier duty trucks have larger brakes. Yes they have larger brakes but the trucks themselves are much heavier, their stopping distances are increased, check out the #'s on them. You'll find across the board farther stopping distances. Even with larger engines, they are slower to accelerate, again check out the #'s....and that's if they have the diesel option. Ram and Chevy both have less powerful gas engines in their 2500 than they do their 1500s. Which puts their gas equivalent even slower yet. Most people on this forum are quick to reccomend a one ton to to someone as a daily driver. That person may tow only a handful of days a year. That one ton has a lower crash rating, worse ride, harder to park, higher maintenance and registration fees, worse fuel economy, ect ect. Yes they're awesome if they're dedicated for towing. Daily driving one just isn't as practical as a half ton, and even they are a compromise compared to many other vehicles. You appear focused on the ego points. If you are taking them out to a track day, I would agree there is a slight edge for the 1/2 ton (even better for a small PU by the way) but since the vast majority of people don't race thier tow vehicles the point is the numbers are really very similar. The standard V8 has plenty of power to get them moving at a brisk pace when empty. I don't think I've ever felt the need to put the pedal more than 1/2way down when not towing in the 3/4tons I've owned and yet that has always been plenty of power to get up to speed. Fuel efficency with similar power packages are about the same. Braking isn't much different as your charts show (less than 10% variation). Having driven both over the years, the one noticable difference is the ride is much stiffer. If you are sensitive, it might bother you. The other possible edge though not as much as it used to be is 1/2 tons used to sit lower to the ground making them easier to get in and out of. More recently it seems the 1/2 ton trucks sit higher apparently to look more like the bigger trucks. A minor point of interest: In the one graph, the Chevy and GMC have different results. As everyone knows, the only difference between the trucks is the badges. That leads me to believe that they did not ensure the tests were between equivilently outfitted trucks or the test has significant variability that isn't being accounted for.
valhalla360 01/15/15 01:06pm Beginning RVing
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