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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Just an FYI re: air conditioner (A/C) not turning on

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cannesdo

Presently in Del Mar, CA

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Posted: 08/08/12 01:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mine went out yesterday, middle of the afternoon. Tried the breakers in the rig and checked the fuses. Everything else in the rig that I tried was working. Turned out it was the outside breaker that needed to be turned off and back on. Don't know why. Never had to flip the switch at the post unless everything in the rig was out (usually the blow dryer wlll trip it on 30 amp if I forget the A/C is also on).

So check that first. It might save you a visit from the RV doc. I just happened to have one coming anyway for something else.

2oldman

Coachella

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Posted: 08/08/12 01:29pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Assuming this is in a CG, they can suffer low voltage when everyone's air is on. Low voltage= more amps = blown breakers. And can possibly damage your a/c. Check your voltage at plugs for overheating.

cannesdo

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Posted: 08/08/12 01:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

Assuming this is in a CG, they can suffer low voltage when everyone's air is on. Low voltage= more amps = blown breakers. And can possibly damage your a/c. Check your voltage at plugs for overheating.


I suspected that when I found out it was the post butthe RV guy (and he's a good one) said nothing anyone else did could have caused this, not sure why. Seems logical to me that the breaker would go if it wasn't getting the power it needed.

Popsie

Livingston, TX, USA

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Posted: 08/08/12 01:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

Assuming this is in a CG, they can suffer low voltage when everyone's air is on. Low voltage= more amps = blown breakers. And can possibly damage your a/c. Check your voltage at plugs for overheating.
If the voltage drops, the current (amps) drops {except in a specially designed circuit that decreases the resistance in response to a voltage drop}. Watts are not a specification of anything except the product of the voltage, amps, and power factor. The watts stated for an AC are for nominal supply voltage. If the voltage drops the current flow drops and the watts consumed are lower.

2oldman

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Posted: 08/08/12 03:00pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Popsie wrote:

The watts stated for an AC are for nominal supply voltage. If the voltage drops the current flow drops and the watts consumed are lower.
This may be correct, but it contradicts every discussion I've ever read on the subject on this board.

I can watch my Prosine panel's amperage reading climb as CG voltage drops. Maybe that's just me.

Wayne Dohnal

Bend, OR.

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Posted: 08/08/12 03:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

The watts stated for an AC are for nominal supply voltage. If the voltage drops the current flow drops and the watts consumed are lower.


That's not what I observed when I measured a 13,500 btuh Brisk Air. The power in watts held surprisingly (to me) constant over a range of voltages:

122.1 volts - 10.50 amps - PF=.93 - VA = 1283 - watts = 1193
116.9 volts - 10.65 amps - PF=.96 - VA = 1245 - watts = 1195
111.6 volts - 10.90 amps - PF=.98 - VA = 1216 - watts = 1192
102.5 volts - 11.50 amps - PF=.98 - VA = 1179 - watts = 1155
98.20 volts - 12.20 amps - PF=.98 - VA = 1198 - watts = 1174


2009 Fleetwood Icon 24A
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garry1p

Oklahoma

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Posted: 08/10/12 07:53pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Popise you are describing what happens in a resistive load like the heater element in an oven or hot water heater.

The opposite happens in and inductive load such as a fan motor or compressor.

As the voltage goes down the current goes up trying to keep the motor turning at the same speed.


Garry1p


1990 Holiday Rambler Aluma Lite XL
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