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 > Your search for posts made by 'Huntindog' found 651 matches.

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RE: the dreaded tire topic...

I have read this whole thread, and I have tried searching others. Maybe I'm not using the right key words... I learned the hard way why you're NOT supposed to use steel-belted radial tires under travel trailers and use bias-ply tires instead. Why is this not mentioned?? I had a blowout the second day of travel from the previous owner's home to the medieval faire where I was at this season (sherwoodforestfaire.com). The whole tread came off, end-to-end, and I found it 10 feet from the right wheel fender of the trailer. It turns out that there were three different tires on there, with DOT dates ranging from 5 to 11 to 14 years old! Later, the very smart farm mechanic I work with looked up there, and showed me that this had happened before because there was a piece of something that had been screwed onto the bottom of the floor (you could see it on your back under the trailer and find the tell-tale outline of something used to cover the hole) to cover that hole, which meant that this wasn't the first time it happened! We went inside and found the floor shot through, through the PLYWOOD and FOAM! There it was, the biggest piece having the steel-belts sticking out of it. Now, I have ALL three tires replaced with NEW bias-ply tires (DOT dates are in 2013), Carlisle Sport Trail LH, ST205/75D14, from Discount Tires per the farm mechanic's recommendation. I see each tire is rated for a max of 1750. (the trailer weighs around 2500 dry and probably weighs around 3000 with my stuff plus water) Does this mean that the two tires together support a weight of 3500 lbs together, or is it 1750 lbs for both tires combined? Anyone have experience with these tires?Steel belts can mess up a car pretty bad too. Steel belted radials offer many benefits. So much so that they have pretty much taken over the market. The key is to use quality tires, check the Air pressure often, and replace then when they age out. Unfortunantly, a quality ST tire is a rare thing.
Huntindog 04/18/14 07:49pm Travel Trailers
RE: Weight distribution/sway control with 1300 lb tongue weight

Sounds like you mostly loaded. The little bit you have left probably won't add more than 100 pounds. So a 1400 will work nicely. More capacity is not better in this area. The WD bars are working springs, the MUST bend when going thru dips , driveways etc. The right size is one that comes closest to what the TW is. Not one that is way over it.
Huntindog 04/17/14 05:39pm Travel Trailers
RE: How heavy of a trailer can I get?

Look at where the water tank is, if it's fwd of the axles tongue weight will decrease on the trip home.Not in all cases. It depends on where the waste water tanks are. Along with a lot of other things.
Huntindog 04/16/14 03:07am Travel Trailers
RE: How heavy of a trailer can I get?

I take it that this is your first TT? Well , good job asking questions here. You will need to sort thru the various opinions to see what makes sense to you. As far as TW goes, I recommend planning on 15%. The reason is that TW can change quite a bit in the course of a trip, and you NEVER want to be below 10%. Water gets used and ends up in either the black or grey tanks, food and drink gets consumed and ends up there as well. Propane gets used and lightens up the TW. Even clothing leaves the closets and ends up in the laundry chute. Other items may just for one reason or another not finish the trip in the same place that they started it. It is impossible for anyone to say just what all these variables will do to the TW. Each TT is different, and everyones camping style is as well. In fact as you grow into TT use, you may change your camping habits from what you are envisioning to something much different.. I know I have. Oh interesting! I never thought about all of that. I was thinking to just pack it when we leave like we did coming home but that makes total sense. So what would happen then if we packed it at 15% but then coming back it was 16? Would it be ok to do 14or so to give wiggle room for the way back? I appreciate your insight!What I meant was plan on 15%. There are times that I am sure I exceed this, but I have a truck that can handle it. 15% will likely be one of the limiting factors of your TV. It is possible depending your TTs layout and your usage that TW could increase during a trip, but it is more likely to decrease. I say this because of the propane tanks. They are typically on the tounge, and the propane doesn't move to another place on the TT, it is consumed and simply disappears. Really it is hard to say with any degree of accuracy, just where you will end up. But if you plan on 15% and it ends up never getting that high, then it's no problem. But if you plan on a lower TW, and it doesn't work out that way, it is a problem.
Huntindog 04/14/14 08:20pm Travel Trailers
RE: How heavy of a trailer can I get?

I take it that this is your first TT? Well , good job asking questions here. You will need to sort thru the various opinions to see what makes sense to you. As far as TW goes, I recommend planning on 15%. The reason is that TW can change quite a bit in the course of a trip, and you NEVER want to be below 10%. Water gets used and ends up in either the black or grey tanks, food and drink gets consumed and ends up there as well. Propane gets used and lightens up the TW. Even clothing leaves the closets and ends up in the laundry chute. Other items may just for one reason or another not finish the trip in the same place that they started it. It is impossible for anyone to say just what all these variables will do to the TW. Each TT is different, and everyones camping style is as well. In fact as you grow into TT use, you may change your camping habits from what you are envisioning to something much different.. I know I have.
Huntindog 04/14/14 06:35pm Travel Trailers
RE: 4 point level up system

I really like my Lippert jacks. They are a really ingenious design. I know quite a bit about how they work, due to a unfortunate oops. I gor interrupted when breaking camp before dawn, and forgot to raise the jacks. I was horrified at the twisted metal that resulted. After pricing new ones, I decided to try and fix them. It went really well, and nobody can tell it ever happened. In the process I learned just how they work. It keeps equal pressure on each pair of jacks making it impossible to rack the frame. Hard to describe how it does it, but it is clever.
Huntindog 04/14/14 06:11pm Travel Trailers
RE: What do you use to lube your stabilizer jacks?

Stabilizers don't need a high priced, high tech lube. In fact you can have too slippery a lube on them. Quite often someone posts on here about their stabilizers backing off by themselves.. Usually too much lube. I have been using WD 40 for years. It is cheap, plentiful and effective for this job.
Huntindog 04/13/14 08:50pm Travel Trailers
RE: Should I leave my Travel trailer plugged in or not?

Just keep the battery water topped off. Some converters are easier on batteries than others when kept plugged in. Check the float voltage. If it's in the 13-13.2 range, then it's a good one. Others have a work around for converters that keep the volts too high. The set it up on a timer.
Huntindog 04/13/14 08:36pm Travel Trailers
RE: My belly is sagging...

I do not have your brand camper, but have dealt with the issue of sagging Coroplast (plastic corrugated sheet) belly cover. Here is a pic of ours a year after we bought the camper. It had a slight sag in it then and the camper was 4 years old on this pic. http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b378/JBarca/T310SR%20Sunline%20As%20Built/Enclosed%20Tank%20Area/Bottomplasticcover.jpg On ours Sunline welded on a 1/16" x 2" flat strip that hung inside I shape main frame rails. They used 1/4" self tapping screws to hold the cover on. See here http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b378/JBarca/T310SR%20Sunline%20As%20Built/Enclosed%20Tank%20Area/freshtankdrain.jpg I did a qty of work in the enclosed tank compartment and after taking it on and off a few times, the sag became worse. http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b378/JBarca/T310SR%20Sunline%20As%20Built/Enclosed%20Tank%20Area/BottomplasticcoveroffTT.jpg The structure of this Coroplast is not very strong, however it is light , makes a cover and will not rot. But it does sag over time. I had to do something with the sag so I make up a few holders to span the width of the frame rails and added fender washer over the screws. Went into Lowes/Home Depot to look at options and that did not cost a small fortune. Found 1/2" x 1 1/2" wide pressure treated wood strips and 3/4" EMT conduit. I used a few stainless steel hose clamps to hold the flat strip to the conduit then bolted the whole thing to the main frame rails. Note: Drill the holes towards the center of the web, not on the outside. I wanted something more elegant and was going to change it out at a later date, however that time has not yet come and probably won't. They work well. I have them spaced about every 30" http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b378/JBarca/T310SR%20Camper%20Upgrades/Axle%20Rebuild/frontaxle.jpg Just passing this along as an option in case someone needs it. Hope this helps JohnI did something similar when I installed pipe insulation and heat tape to all of my plumbing. I removed the coroplast completely, and used 1x4 pieces of pine cut to a length that would fit above the bottom of the frame rails crosswise. You gotta put them in at a angle, then straighten them out so they rest on the inside of the bottom beam. On some, there was a hole already from the previous coroplast install so I put a screw thru it into the pine to secure it, but it really isn't needed. I cut the coroplast into smaller easier to remove sections of 4-6 ft. And over lapped it front to rear so the wind can't catch it. Everywhere there is a overlap, there is a pine board to screw into, and some in the middle of the bigger sections. Now there is no sag, and access for repairs etc. is easy
Huntindog 04/13/14 05:13pm Travel Trailers
RE: More newbie questions - black tank flush system

your flusher system is somehow connected to the sink inside the RV? a very strange hookup. and the antiflow valve will leak when shut off as a little water will drain back from the "clean" side. and if you want to blast at the pile of stuff, do not build up a bunch of water in there when you try that. all that extra water will do is absorb some of the hydraulic shock that the sprayer is trying to give the stuff. since you bought the RV last fall and only now are using the sprayer for the first time, it may be impossible to get that pyramid out without heroic measures. as a last resort you could use a pressure washer either down thru the toilet if possible or remove the black tank sprayer and poke it in that hole. and the salesmans statement I guess I will get the toilet wand and the Johnny Chock (Thanks to the poster who put that up! I would not have thought of it.) and be prepared to use that since this installed flusher is not good for this situation, in spite the sales guys promises that "You'll never need anything else!" would probably be true if you would routinely use that sprayer, not once a year after it becomes too late. bumpyThis is a normal setup nowadays. The water hose screws into a fitting on the outside of the TT. It usually goes up to a location under the sink, or behind the shower etc. It connects to a air gap antisiphon valve. The output from this valve now heads down to the tank sprayer. It shouldn't leak much when shut off, as gravity will make the clean side drain down thru the hose connection outside the TT. Maybe a drop or two. This is to prevent the possibility of black water entering the freshwater supply.. Everyone should be using some sort of device to prevent this. It is probably code in most locations, and even if it's not, your neighbors will appreciate it's use.
Huntindog 04/13/14 04:07pm Travel Trailers
RE: tire ware

If only one tire is showing bad wear, then a bent axle from curbing or a pothole etc. likely is the culprit. Since both tires on this axle is showing bad wear, then it is like losing it's camber due to overloading. I would visit the scales as a first step to see. If it is only slightly over loaded, then the fix may be as simple as lightening the load, and hopefully the camber springs back. Or the camber loss could be permanent. Then you would need to get it recambered, or better yet replaced with a heavier axle to keep it from happening again.
Huntindog 04/13/14 03:51pm Travel Trailers
RE: Replace the locks?

I took mine to a locksmith and he rekeyed them for less then half of what new locks cost. I only paid $6.00 a lock, all keyed alike.
Huntindog 04/13/14 01:28pm Tech Issues
RE: where do you stay

Electrical problems can be really hard to track down. The hardest one I've had was where a staple thru the siding pierced a 12 volt line. It would tend to burn out one sidemarker light, But was inconsistent in it's failing... Spent many hours to find and fix it. You really need to find a 12 volt guru. Many of the CW type techs are simply parts changers.
Huntindog 04/13/14 04:25am Travel Trailers
RE: Gray/black dump system - am I nuts?

I would make them fix it. The equalizing suggestion wouldn't work for me. The black water level is often my limiting factor for how long I can stay out. I need it fill up as slow as possible.
Huntindog 04/13/14 03:12am Travel Trailers
RE: Replace the locks?

If you are concerned about someone getting into your storage compartments, don't even bother with replacing the locks with the same kind, even with different keys. A screwdriver is all that is needed to pop the doors, with no visible damage even except a bent tab on the lock. Been there.NOTHING will stop a determined thief. Windows can be broken and doors pried. But changing the compartment locks is a low priced way to deter most. I think it is cost effective. For the determined thief.... Well that's why I also have insurance. So far I haven't needed it.
Huntindog 04/12/14 07:11pm Tech Issues
RE: outside flood light

I don't have any suggestions for lighting other than..... Do it!! My current TT came with many outside lights. I never knew what I was missing. Pulling into a dog trial late, and staking out the dogs, leveling, and and setting up the generator is so much easier now. Not to mention when something needs doing at 2AM like a dog needing to potty etc.
Huntindog 04/12/14 07:02pm Travel Trailers
RE: trailer axles

Hi, I have a 2011 keystone summerland. I have noticed that when I go around curves like a coldest that the front and rear axles are not aligned. They have a different camber. But after driving in a straight line they shore back up. There is no irregular wear on the tires. Is this what they mean by floating axles? Thanks bill Yes it's normal. Also when backing in, and turning sharply you will see the tandem out of line. It is best to always back far enough to be able to pull up, and straighten them out. But that is why trailer tires are built differently tan TV tires. They are designed to slide sideways in a turn, and not pull off the rimDo you have a link to anywhere that has happened? The testing requirements for bead seating for STs vs. LTs are identical. (If only rest of the requirements were!) This is a often repeated myth with nothing to back it up... I believe that it likely has it's origins from the tire makers propaganda. Much like the rest of the touted advantages. To the OP. It is normal. There is a lot of slop, and loose clearances, along with the springs ability to bend some, so it shouldn't cause the problems that Redracer describes. But not all TTs are created equal. My last TT did have some problems. Luckily I can weld, so it was a easy fix for me to make it better and stronger than new. My present TT has much better reinforcing in key areas, and has been trouble free... And it is a much maligned Lippert frame to boot. There is nothing you can do, but inspect it. If it looks like it needs improvement, then a preemptive fix may well be the best option.
Huntindog 04/12/14 01:34pm Travel Trailers
RE: Shower pressure

In my case there is a shot of HOT water after the shutoff in the RV has been disengaged. I usually put up my palm to take the hit.Yes as I said, that can happen if for some reason the resistance is greater in the cold water supply lines. The ball cock valve mod will fix either situation. Never has any grouse with what you said .... just making the point that the opposite occurs in my case and how I deal with it. Not sure what the red text is all about ... :hSorry. It appeared to me that you missed what I said earlier about this fix working in either situation. And that non boondockers likely don't "need" this fix.
Huntindog 04/10/14 03:06am Travel Trailers
RE: Shower pressure

In my case there is a shot of HOT water after the shutoff in the RV has been disengaged. I usually put up my palm to take the hit.Yes as I said, that can happen if for some reason the resistance is greater in the cold water supply lines. The ball cock valve mod will fix either situation. Non boondockers don't have the water conservation concerns that boondockers do, so aiming it away, or into ones palm etc. is a good solution. For boondockers, water is our most precious resource. How well we mange it will determine how long we can camp.
Huntindog 04/09/14 02:22am Travel Trailers
RE: Shower pressure

I am on my third TT and have fixed this problem 3 times. The first TT was easy. I was able to unscrew the end that the water sprays out of and block off all of the inside water holes. I used a piece of duct tape cut into a circle, just leaving the outside circle of holes open for water. It worked perfect. The second TT needed the same thing, plus it had a restrictor washer that I needed to remove. My latest TT needed both of the previous mods, and the actual fixture had a restrictor hole that I had to drill out. So the fix can be simple to more involved depending on just what is causing the problem. While you are at it, now is a good time to address The cold shot of water after using the shutoff feature. If you don't boondock, then this probably isn't important to you. If you do, read on. Most TT showers will give a shot of cold water after using the shut off at the showerhead. You get it all set for the temp you want, and turn it off to soap up, and are tortured by COLD water when rinsing. The reason is the dribble of warm water that continues when the shutoff is engaged. In most TTs there is more resistance in the hot water supply line due to the water heater being involved. This means that the dribble of warm water will be replaced with water from the cold water line. In a few TTs the problem is the opposite, due to variations in the plumbing. No matter, this mod will fix either situation. Go to a hardware store and get a plastic ball cock valve. IIRC, it is the 1/2"threaded size. Get the fittings to install it between the hose and shower head. Use this as your shutoff, and the flow will be 100% stopped. When turned back on, the water will be very close to the temp it was when turned off. There will only be the natural cooling of the warm water sitting stationary in the lines. Total cost is about $5.00 and 10 minutes.
Huntindog 04/08/14 08:16pm Travel Trailers
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