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 > Your search for posts made by 'Huntindog' found 571 matches.

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RE: Myth that socket extensions change torque wrench readings

Your 3 foot crows foot will add as much as 1.2 feet to the length of the wrench at a 90 degree angle or to be more precise it will add Sqrt(18)-3 feet That is for a wrench with a 3 foot handle,, the relationship is for those math inmpaired is Sqrt = Square Root Sqrt((Handle^handle)+(extension*extension)) if it's 90 degrees Example if the extension is 3 feet, the handle 4, the overall effective length is five. Put me in the math impaired camp...:B That's Ok though as I knew that other thinking had to be wrong. Often times if one "grows" a line of thought,,, it becomes obvious what the right answer is. With regard to this side topic: The length doesn't change at all if you apply the force perpendicular to the wrench handle. By definition, torque is the force applied at a perpendicular distance and that is still the length of the wrench if the crowfoot is 90 degrees to the wrench. The calculation above only comes in to play if you push perpendicular to the imaginary line between the wrench handle and the bolt. In that case the torque applied to the bolt will increase. The reason is the same force applied perpendicular to the wrench will cause the wrench to reach its value as the non-crowfoot case. By pushing at an angle to the handle some additional force is being applied straight down the handle endways. This additional force acts to rotate the crowfoot without being measured by the wrench.The end result is the bolt has more torque applied to it than is measured my the wrench. It matters little what angle the crows foott is at.
Huntindog 08/04/15 04:07am Tech Issues
RE: Tires - When to change

Discount tire states that ST tires have lost IIRC 33% of their strength at 3 years. And that they should be replaced at 3 years no matter how good they look. LT tires will last longer. I have read up to 10 years. I replace mine at 5 years just to be safe.
Huntindog 08/03/15 08:40pm Travel Trailers
RE: Too much tongue weight

There are times that I want to be able to break camp quickly and to be level I need the nose of the TT down, but don't want to unhook. There are several tricks that can make my Truck look like that... But I can assure you, I have enough truck. Weight in the bed for one. loosining the WD bars, and my favorite, digging some holes for the back tires. sometimes I even dig a hole for the tounge jack foot I have used all of these tricks, even all at once depending on the situation. So this pic really means nothing
Huntindog 08/03/15 06:46pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Myth that socket extensions change torque wrench readings

Your 3 foot crows foot will add as much as 1.2 feet to the length of the wrench at a 90 degree angle or to be more precise it will add Sqrt(18)-3 feet That is for a wrench with a 3 foot handle,, the relationship is for those math inmpaired is Sqrt = Square Root Sqrt((Handle^handle)+(extension*extension)) if it's 90 degrees Example if the extension is 3 feet, the handle 4, the overall effective length is five. Put me in the math impaired camp...:B That's Ok though as I knew that other thinking had to be wrong. Often times if one "grows" a line of thought,,, it becomes obvious what the right answer is.
Huntindog 08/02/15 06:26pm Tech Issues
RE: Myth that socket extensions change torque wrench readings

If you hook that Crow Foot to come off the side, at a right angle you are not adding any length to the torque wrench. Generally agree. Not exactly 90 degrees though. L1 must equal L2. Think about a really long crows foot. Say a 3 footer. Are you saying that so long as it is at a 90 degree angle to the torque wrench that it will have no effect? I disagree with that thought. And if I am right to disagree, then a short crows foot will have the same (of course much less) effect.
Huntindog 08/02/15 04:28pm Tech Issues
RE: Air Conditioner Current Draw

The "head pressure" is dependent on ambient air temps along with "run cycle" so depending on what outside temp was and how long you monitored it (ie. number of cycles), you may not have reached its highest "demand". The "starting capacitor" is used to limited the high current draw during startup.X2. It's a double edged sword. The hotter it gets, the higher the head pressure, so more amps needed... At the same time, the generator power goes down as it gets hotter. This why I don't think much of driveway tests. A success in the driveway doesn't always make for success when camped.
Huntindog 08/02/15 04:06pm Travel Trailers
RE: Myth that socket extensions change torque wrench readings

It only changes the torque if you add length, like a crows foot. If it's just a normal extension to get to a deeper bolt/nut then no toque difference. That's what I've always understood- extensions like this: http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31XAsWzKkVL._SY300_.jpg require calculation for proper torque. Correct and there is a formula for setting the right torque on an adjustable or the reading on a bar type wrench. The following formula has been used: M1 = M2 x L1 / L2 Where: M1 is the torque setting of the wrench. M2 is the actual torque applied to the nut L1 is the normal length of the wrench L2 is the extended length of the wrench Marvin If you hook that Crow Foot to come off the side, at a right angle you are not adding any length to the torque wrench.Say What???? Give this a try and report back with your findings.
Huntindog 08/01/15 08:09pm Tech Issues
RE: traveling with water tows better?

Actually over 200 gallons isn't uncommon. I prefer empty. 200 gallons??? In what a water truck?? LOL I can't think of a trail that would handle that much, can you? If your trailer had full tanks, you would be real close to 200gals. I don't know if it could handle the weight ;) Not 200 gallons of fresh water. Who would run around with the gray and black tank full to the brim, nutsNot really. I have four 42 gallon waste tanks. Since I always boondock, (the absolute best way to camp. Awesome spots and no neighbors) I routinely tow home with all of them full or close to it. I think the campgound fans are nuts. i just don't see the attraction of going from the city house to a smaller version of the same thing. If that was all I had available to me, I doubt I'd own a TT. But lots of people love it, so more power to them. They do get to tow home with empty tanks.:B
Huntindog 08/01/15 01:23pm Travel Trailers
RE: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) on the Open Roads Forum

It all depends on the design of the trailer and the capabilities of the TV and hitch. The general recommendation is that a TT should have fron 10% to 15% TW How this came about is pretty simple. Most TTs NEED at least 10% TW to tow well. And most TVs and hitches won't be able to handle more than 15% TW. The bottom 10% figure is pretty much set in stone. But the upper 15% figure can be gone over IF the TV and hitch are capable of it. In fact the more TW, the better they will tow. Many here are very concerned about TW as their TVs have a low limit in this area. Another thought to ponder, is that TTs are different from most other trailers in that the TW can vary a lot in the course of a trip. FW gets used and ends up in waste tanks. Food gets eaten and ends up there as well. Propane gets consummed and dissappears. Many other items can move around the TT as well. This why I always caution those with a TV that can barely handle the 10% TW. I have a stout truck and hitch, and like my TW heavy. MY TT has four 42 gallon waste tanks.... Talk about some potential for weight moving around!
Huntindog 07/31/15 05:18am Beginning RVing
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

So my question to you is, why do you care how others maintain their campers? The only reason I'd care would be if I was buying a trailer used. All other things equal, I'd go with the one maintained every year over one that gets this magical inspection every 7-10. I don't. The basic question is: Why is there disparity between trailers and TV's because Timken say's they are both a tapered roller bearing. I could be wrong, so don't slam me, just my observation based on the vehicles I've owned. You are; but I won't slam you as you have requested. Hate to break this to you, but what you're doing is not a proper bearing inspection. Do you even remove the inner bearing? How do you possible inspect the bearing without cleaning it off? Not proper inspection? But yet I have never had a bearing failure. :h LOL, fairies must be inspecting and packing them at night for me! Hate to break this to you but hubs are a sealed system. If the seals are in good condition and there is no contamination and the grease is in good condition and no spalling on the front side it works for me. Remember, I'm not the one with bearing failures. You're wrong regarding the lateral forces on bearings on a TANDEM trailer v a car or truck. See that little 1/8" or 3/16 x 1 1/4" shackle on your trailer? That little piece of sheet metal holds all of that twisting force you like to talk about. How many bearing have you seen fail from side load? (It's really called thrust load but I used common words for you.) There is a reason manufactures use big strong parts in front end steering and suspension parts but scarcely more than sheet metal parts to put with all of that thrust load of yours. X2 on the shackle. Also the spring hangars are just heavy pieces of tin as well. Fact is that these heavy side loads is an internet myth. It got it's start when the ST tire manufacturers made it up as a selling point for their junk tires. It has NEVER been independantly verified as fact. Just the opposite. Guess which tire, LT or ST is tested to a higher standard for bead seat retention force? The truth is, they are exactly the same. So much for the marketing of STs having stiffer sidewalls to deal with this made up increased force. If that were true, then the spring hangars and shackles would NEED to be heavier as well... It ain't rocket science.
Huntindog 07/30/15 03:17am Travel Trailers
RE: Live and learn

I knew better than to put too much pressure on my stablizer jacks and did it anyway. The street side rear caused the siding to flex to the point that the lower row of siding broke loose right at the connection point with the row above it. It actually broke the panel loose along a line just at the point where the upper edge goes under the panel above. It split the metal for about 18 inches from the rear corner toward the front. I hope to repair it without taking the whole bottom panel off. This is all due to frame flex I think.Taking the bottom panel off is pretty easy. It is the first one that comes off. A new panel will be the best fix. You will need a power staple gun to install it. I used a pneumatic one, but an electric one would probably work. I doubt that a hand powered manual one has enough umph to do it. No idea on the cost of the panels.
Huntindog 07/29/15 07:38pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Holy cow, went away camping and I missed all the fun. The interesting thing is that the fact in this 8 pages is 12k or 1 year is fact for 2 major manufacturers. The rest of this 8 pages is opinion. I think I will use the 12k or 1 year as a good reference point and then apply my personal experience and personal opinion to arrive at a repacking schedule that suits my personal RVing habits. But in reality it will likely be close to what the manufacturer recommends. What would be really interesting is if we applied the same opinions in the thread to trailer towing weights (ya I am going there... sorry guys). Just opinion here, not fact but... I wonder if people who repack religiously every year and never miss even by a week are the ones who will never pull a trailer more than 40-50% (dry) of the tow capacity and people who repack every 7-8 years tow at 200-300% capacity??? Is it safe to assume that what I have learned from this thread is that the manufacturers have to put some number to towing weight but that number is not right for everyone, so GVWR and towing capacity of the TV are really rough numbers as the manufacturer really has no idea how you are going to tow and then lawyer fudge factor has to be added in too... will you have 6 kids, 2 dogs and 1000 pounds of luggage going across death valley in the summer or a couple of tiny grandparents with 2 changes of clothes, stopping for groceries every day and only driving 2 hours across the prairies when it is in the 60's??? But regardless for bearing repacking or towing weight or most anything to do with towing, for those who are not very experienced should stick close to the manufacturers numbers and those who are more experienced have some wiggle room because they understand the risks and the factors that make up the numbers? Now I am really going to stir things up: Since TTs do not have odometers on them, and the only way to determine actual mileage would be to log it off of the TV..... I surmise that nobody really knows just how many miles they go on a bearing repack..... Oh there will be some that swear they know.... But in most cases it is only a rough guess... Some guesses will be a LOT rougher than others.... So now for those of you that want a firm milage number.... How will you deal with the fact that you really don't have one at all. Since thare are some that swear that the 12K limit is the golden rule, and they really don't know when they are getting close to it.... Better repack early so you don't go over.
Huntindog 07/29/15 07:28pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

If you had read anything I wrote, in any of my threads, you would know that I just bought the camper in March. I just recently repacked the bearings. You have no idea what grease I used yet you use a condescending tone suggesting I buy QUALITY grease... The real point is that you have decided to come on this forum and deride folks here because they are diligent with maintaining their RVs. What they do has no effect on you, YET you start finding fault. Perhaps it would be best to just live and let live here. We can all go back to our rvs... nuf saidI would like to point out that your questions have been answered... You just didn't like the answers.:B
Huntindog 07/28/15 04:54pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Actually. you asked me. See my response on the last page for your reply.It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply...
Huntindog 07/28/15 03:15am Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today. OK, So the manufacturer is wrong.... how often do YOU recommend?That is a tough call. I will say that everyone should learn how to do this themselves. I think more failures are caused by repackings done incorrectly than from lack of maintainence. (and that includes a lot of shops) If done right, there is no reason that they cannot last as long as on a car. But.... Everyones usage is different. Some are just harder on things than others. Personally, I do mine at 2-4 years give or take.
Huntindog 07/27/15 06:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today.
Huntindog 07/27/15 01:33pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

Do you have 6 lug drums? If so, then that is a great start as 16" rims are most common with 6 lugs. If not, then a swap to 6 lug drums is likely the best solution. With a diameter difference of only 1", that will only change this measurement by 1/2" over what you have now. So you are probably OK here, though you do need to check it to make sure. If you will not have the necessary clearance, then it can be obtained by a small lift. If the springs are over the axles, then a 1/2" lift block will work. The other clearance issue is the space between the tires. You need 1" when level. So you will need 2" now in order for the new tires to work. You likely do have this much space. If not, then there is no easy way to solve this issue Yes, currently have 15" x 6" Rim - 6 lug on 5-1/2. I'll need to re-check but feel like I have at least 4 inches from the top of the 15 in tire to the inside of the wheel well. . I know I have more than two inches between tires. Where did you get your clearance info? The clearance info is straight from the Dexter manual. Just checked. I have 2 1/2 inches clearance from the top of the 15 in tire to the inside of the wheel well and 5 1/2 inches clearance between tires. Doesn't appear like this is going to work without the lift kit you mentioned. I plan to call Jayco Monday to verify. I'll probably end up going the most conservative direction and mount five Maxxis M8008 225/75R15 10ply ST Trailer tires with the expectation I'll need to do it again in about 5 years. Thanks!2.5" is less than the minimum spec. Was that measure ment the same for all 4 tires? If so, then you already have a clearance issue. It is possible that you just haven't hit a bump hard enough for the tire to contact the wheelwell,,,,,,yet. More likely is the measurement wasn't done right. The axles are constantly moving and shifting in relation to one another. If the equalizer between the springs is not level, then one tire will have more clearance than the other. A simple way to account for this is to measure the clearance od both tires and divide by two. And... ST tires are considered used up at 3 years. From Discount Tire: Time •Time and the elements weaken a trailer tire. •In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone. •Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire. •It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.
Huntindog 07/26/15 01:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

Do you have 6 lug drums? If so, then that is a great start as 16" rims are most common with 6 lugs. If not, then a swap to 6 lug drums is likely the best solution. With a diameter difference of only 1", that will only change this measurement by 1/2" over what you have now. So you are probably OK here, though you do need to check it to make sure. If you will not have the necessary clearance, then it can be obtained by a small lift. If the springs are over the axles, then a 1/2" lift block will work. The other clearance issue is the space between the tires. You need 1" when level. So you will need 2" now in order for the new tires to work. You likely do have this much space. If not, then there is no easy way to solve this issue Yes, currently have 15" x 6" Rim - 6 lug on 5-1/2. I'll need to re-check but feel like I have at least 4 inches from the top of the 15 in tire to the inside of the wheel well. . I know I have more than two inches between tires. Where did you get your clearance info? The clearance info is straight from the Dexter manual.
Huntindog 07/26/15 02:33am Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

I posted in another thread my concerns with the ST225/75R15 Goodyear® Marathon Radial on our 2011 Jayco33rlds. I received a lot of good information on different ST tires and some suggestions on upgrading to an LT 16 inch tire. I am willing to spend the money on 16 inch wheels to upgrade to a LT225/75R16. I am looking at Firestone Transforce HT 225/75R16. The specs on the Firestone Transforce HT 225/75R16 indicates that the overall diameter is 29.3 inches. The overall diameter on the ST225/75R15 Goodyear® Marathon Radial is 28.30. Has anyone with a Jayco33rlds done this upgrade and if so what were the results? I truly appreciate the experienced minds that prowl these forums. Thanks for the help. I have no experience with your TT. But I have upgraded tires on all of my TTs. Some are eaiser than others to do. Do you have 6 lug drums? If so, then that is a great start as 16" rims are most common with 6 lugs. If not, then a swap to 6 lug drums is likely the best solution. The tire diameter is a concern in two areas. The clearance from the top of the tire to the wheelwell. It needs to be 3" or more. Measured when the TT spring equalizer is level. With a diameter difference of only 1", that will only change this measurement by 1/2" over what you have now. So you are probably OK here, though you do need to check it to make sure. If you will not have the necessary clearance, then it can be obtained by a small lift. If the springs are over the axles, then a 1/2" lift block will work. The other clearance issue is the space between the tires. You need 1" when level. So you will need 2" now in order for the new tires to work. You likely do have this much space. If not, then there is no easy way to solve this issue. 16" tires are a great upgrade, as it opens up a vast choice of quality tires to you. Due to the fact that many pickups take this size, it is one of the most common sizes available.
Huntindog 07/25/15 03:52pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT225/75R16 on a 2011 Jayco33rlds

I guess the question is how much safer is safer? My TT axels are rated to 3500 lbs. each or 1750 lbs. per tire, my OEM ST205/75R15 tires are rated 1820 lbs. load range C. A safety margin of 70 lbs. per tire. When it comes time to change I will probably go to a slightly larger ST225/75R15 load range C rated 2150 lbs. per tire, providing a safety factor of 400 lbs. per tire. If there is enough clearance for the wider tire I can use the same rims. I could go to a D rated tire and get a 790 lb. safety factor per tire but where do you draw the line? Heck there are some E rated tire that would darn near allow me to go to a single axle. I have put 10,000 plus miles on the OEM tire and I bought the rig used. The tires will time out before they wear out and the ST225s are about the same price as the ST205s. I only hope they will ride as smooth.One thing to consider is that the tire rating is for a new tire. As the tire ages, it will become less and less able to perform as designed. Of course that is true of most all of the running gear, but axles, bearings etc. degrade much slower over time than rubber.... So starting with a substantial margin in a tire is a good thing. How much is debatable.... I like to get as much as is reasonably possible YMMV.
Huntindog 07/25/15 03:36pm Travel Trailers
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