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 > Your search for posts made by 'Huntindog' found 759 matches.

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RE: Cool weather..Can I use a dehumidifier instead of vent?

I use a Fridgidaire 50 pint model. My EU2000 runs it at idle. I have the extended run tank for it, so no nighttime refueling is needed. The dehumidifier set on continuous will actually make it so dry that it becomes uncomfortable. My nose and skin dries out. So I usually set it at 35%. It pulls an astounding amount of water out of the air. Water that would have otherwise ended up condensing inside my walls, and starting the slow inevitable march to delamination. It will not keep up when using all three burners when cooking breakfast, but showers etc are not a problem. My TT is 34' with two slides. It is the DW, myself and 4 brittanys inside. It is true that not all dehumidfiers work well in cold temps, but some do...And it is a moot point, as it will be running in heated inside air. The cost of running the generator is at least partially offset by using less propane with the TT closed up... Plus gas is easier t get than propane
Huntindog 01/28/15 04:28pm Travel Trailers
RE: LT or P Tires ?

This forum is a place where I go to make the RV experience better.... LT tires will be better for towing. P tires will give a better ride when not towing... I support the use of LT tires for towing... If one is interested in a cushy ride, I am sure that there are forums that will support that desire.:B
Huntindog 01/28/15 04:01pm Travel Trailers
RE: Cold weather camping and sweating in closet

Given the porosity of a typical trailer, I wonder if a humidifier would be able to red uce the moisture much? The other suggestions will help.Not on a stick and tin TT... But on a fiberglass,,,, yes and a lot. I have a meter that measure humidity, and can see the difference. That is a good thing as the stick and tin TTs don't have potential for delamination. Wiping down the windows is NOT a solution. The same condensation is happening inside the walls... Given enough time, delamination WILL result.
Huntindog 01/27/15 01:06pm Travel Trailers
RE: Cold weather camping and sweating in closet

This is a danger sign. Condensation will cause delamination. As has been mentioned: Venting or a dehumidifier can help a lot. Running the heat at a cooler setting will as well. I use a dehumidifier. It pulls an incredible amount of water out of the air. All that water would be on my walls and windows with out it... BTW, sweating shows up first on the windows, when you see that, take some action NOW!!. Cracking the closet doors is a good thing, no matter which method you use to control the condensation. But be sure to DO SOMETHING. My Forest River manual has warnings about this subject, I am sure others do as well.
Huntindog 01/26/15 11:00pm Travel Trailers
RE: Quality Shore power cord

Probably more than most people are interested in, but some general information on cord: S types without the "J" are 600v Extra Hard Usage Service Grade. SJ types are 300v Junior Hard Service Grade. Code does not specify which cord type (S or SJ) is required for an RV, only length (minimum of 25'). Although SJ cords are lighter & less expensive, they are more easily damaged. Type S cords have thicker jackets, more fillers, and are much tougher (most could be used as a tow chain). Either can be made with a thermoplastic or synthetic rubber jacket. Thermoplastic insulations are less expensive, but get very stiff when cold, while synthetic rubber are flexible warm or cold, but cost quite a bit more than thermoplastic. To add even more confusion, there are Thermoset cord types that can have good cold flexibility. Cord designations use additional letters to define some of their specifications. For example, an "O" stands for oil resistant and can be added to either weight cord. An additional "O" stands for oil resistant fillers, a "W" for weather resistant. If there is a "T" in the cord description, it will be thermoplastic, however some thermoplastic cords leave out the "T". Because the letter designations can be confusing, it is better to look at specific manufacturers. Carol Wire produces both an S & SJ Super Vu-Tron rubber cord, however #10 is the largest size available on a standard order. This is an extremely flexible cord even below freezing. Coleman Wire manufactures Seoprene 105 SEOOW & SJEOOW cord that is rated as extremely flexible at cold temperatures. Here is a link to general cord information & their product. Lastly, some of the cord you can purchase at your local big box hardware store will be thermoplastic. You need to carefully check the product information if you want cold weather cord. Another solution is to go to a real electrical supplier to get the better quality cords, however they will not be inexpensive. Thank you. That is VERY informative... With this info, I can look at the markings on a cord, have a better idea of what it is.
Huntindog 01/26/15 12:22pm Tech Issues
RE: LT or P Tires ?

Gas is cheap, so now is the time to try LTs... Once you do, you probably will stay with them no matter how much gas costs
Huntindog 01/25/15 06:20pm Travel Trailers
RE: Quality Shore power cord

Let me try again. Also, I would like it to be as all weather as possible, which looks like a cord with molded ends from the factory would be the ticket. I have looked at quite a few online... The lack of specifics in the descriptions is driving me nuts. Cords from 50.00 to 150.00 have pretty much the same info on them. There are some yellow ones out there for over 100.00... But since they are yellow, I doubt that they are rubber??? Let me try this again, answering your question. It becomes obvious you are looking for us to provide a Link you can click on and order one without leaving your home. That is certainly fine with me. As going to a General Air Welding shop, with your current cord in hand, or a picture of the connector on the end, then describing your needed use to the sales staff (as some generators use a different twist off connectors to ensure they do not become disconnected from the vibration of the generator or use) just put into your Google search Extreme weather Use Power Cord and you instantly get 26,300,000 results. As long as you use a 12ga or 10ga cord, irrelevant on the color of the cord, you will meet your needs for powering up with a generator. I ran a generator everyday for over 2 years as I began Full timing and am very familiar with your situation, as I am almost to 6 years Full timing and boondocking over 1,980 of these nights. But now use 1,860 watts, of solar, to meet my fulltiming, boondocking demands. Here is a good example that will meet your needs. It is also available in shorter lengths. I would not get a cord smaller in gauge than 12g. You can also cut off these cord ends and attach your own, to match your generator, or pay someone to do it for you. b Extreme Weather power cord 12/3 ClickyNO. What is obvious is that you like to tell others what to do. Re read your first response, and realize how far off base you were. What puzzles me though, why do you need a shore power cord? Your signature states you BOONDOCK 100% of the time. If that is the case, you have no need for a shore power cord. Boondockers don't need to plug in, as they are off the grid as there are no power poles or electrical access available. Or maybe change your signature to reflect the change you are making. What I am interested in is a quality cord that will last, and preferably factory built. I am perfectly OK with what I have now, other than it isn't aging gracefully. I am hoping that someone else who has had this problem in the past will have a recommendation on what to get, based on their EXPERIENCE in purchasing and using a quality replacement.Absolutely, you are correct. I like sharing information, just like the in the fashion MEXICOWANDERER does and often. I am sure that this is what this forum is all about! Helping others and sharing. If you don't care for the information, ignore it or choose not to post your question. One has the right to post here and not be dissuaded by others. As for the first post, I did not have all the information and to be honest never thought anyone would be boondocking with only a generator, 100% of the time. My mistake and a learning experience in others uses and how they boondock. Once that information was provided by another frequent contributor, MrWizard, as you stated; Teller of what to do, I became a much more informed contributor. Thus my further comments were more on point, as you might see. As an investigator, we are given the information and only use the information given (your OP and Signature) When there are others and witnesses to provide more detail (MrWizard, MEXICOWANDERER,pianotuna and others) than the original complainant (Huntindog), then one should use that to continue to get to the result. Like you, I suffered the issues dealing with cold weather and have shared my experiences extensively about 4 season boondocking. I have had to make adjustments, over the following years and felt that my personal experiences, of almost 6 years, of Fulltiming would benefit you. As you stated you wanted experiences of others. When first met with your problem personally, I first looked at the expensive cords that are available at Home Depot with the marine connector, too. But I decided to just make my own, for what turned out to be 45% of $$ what the Factory Made Home Depot cord would cost. The majority of people, posting here ih the RV.net forum Tech Issues, are looking for how one can do it themselves (D.I.Y.) so as you showed you were looking for something manufactured, in a later comment, so I again adjusted my responses. In fact, included a link and how to search for this yourself. One interested in finding where to purchased a manufactured cord generally will go to their specific RV.net Forum, like Class C, 5th Wheel or General RVing. Not a forum where others, like me, will be telling you what you could do. My apologies for this confusion. I do hope you find a solution, because I too hate dragging some hoses and cords into my RV to warm them up, so as I can coil them up and store them. But in your situation it appears you are dealing with a permanently connected shore power cord. Good luck and all the best! bNO. My detachable Marinco power cord is getting harder to coil in cold weather. Is there a better quality one available? That is all the info that was necessary to address my problem.
Huntindog 01/25/15 04:28pm Tech Issues
RE: Quality Shore power cord

delete
Huntindog 01/25/15 03:26pm Tech Issues
RE: Quality Shore power cord

Let me try again. Also, I would like it to be as all weather as possible, which looks like a cord with molded ends from the factory would be the ticket. I have looked at quite a few online... The lack of specifics in the descriptions is driving me nuts. Cords from 50.00 to 150.00 have pretty much the same info on them. There are some yellow ones out there for over 100.00... But since they are yellow, I doubt that they are rubber??? Let me try this again, answering your question. It becomes obvious you are looking for us to provide a Link you can click on and order one without leaving your home. That is certainly fine with me. As going to a General Air Welding shop, with your current cord in hand, or a picture of the connector on the end, then describing your needed use to the sales staff (as some generators use a different twist off connectors to ensure they do not become disconnected from the vibration of the generator or use) just put into your Google search Extreme weather Use Power Cord and you instantly get 26,300,000 results. As long as you use a 12ga or 10ga cord, irrelevant on the color of the cord, you will meet your needs for powering up with a generator. I ran a generator everyday for over 2 years as I began Full timing and am very familiar with your situation, as I am almost to 6 years Full timing and boondocking over 1,980 of these nights. But now use 1,860 watts, of solar, to meet my fulltiming, boondocking demands. Here is a good example that will meet your needs. It is also available in shorter lengths. I would not get a cord smaller in gauge than 12g. You can also cut off these cord ends and attach your own, to match your generator, or pay someone to do it for you. b Extreme Weather power cord 12/3 ClickyNO. What is obvious is that you like to tell others what to do. Re read your first response, and realize how far off base you were. What puzzles me though, why do you need a shore power cord? Your signature states you BOONDOCK 100% of the time. If that is the case, you have no need for a shore power cord. Boondockers don't need to plug in, as they are off the grid as there are no power poles or electrical access available. Or maybe change your signature to reflect the change you are making. What I am interested in is a quality cord that will last, and preferably factory built. I am perfectly OK with what I have now, other than it isn't aging gracefully. I am hoping that someone else who has had this problem in the past will have a recommendation on what to get, based on their EXPERIENCE in purchasing and using a quality replacement.
Huntindog 01/25/15 03:23pm Tech Issues
RE: Quality Shore power cord

Let me try again. My main gripe with my original cord is the wrestling match I gotta have with it when breaking camp at 20 degrees. Other than that, I am pretty happy with it (though I may opt for a slightly longer new one). So 18 gauge cords are out as are shorter ones. With 4000 watts of generator power available, I don't want the cord to be a limiting factor. Also, I would like it to be as all weather as possible, which looks like a cord with molded ends from the factory would be the ticket. I have looked at quite a few online... The lack of specifics in the descriptions is driving me nuts. Cords from 50.00 to 150.00 have pretty much the same info on them. There are some yellow ones out there for over 100.00... But since they are yellow, I doubt that they are rubber??? I don't mind spending some money on a better cord, but am leary of doing so just to end up with the same situation a few years from now.
Huntindog 01/25/15 12:45pm Tech Issues
RE: Stainless propane hoses

never had to replace any propane hoses, can't think of why anyone would be considering changing these hoses. can't wonder why someone like huntindog would have to change his hoses frequently???? interesting.Dunno. I do use my TT a LOT, and go thru a lot of propane. And the high tempertures in Phoenix AZ during the summer is probably a factor as well. All I am certain of is that the only TT that never had propane line problems was my first one that had metal lines.
Huntindog 01/23/15 12:38pm Tech Issues
RE: Stainless propane hoses

Chris is correct. Propane hose is rated to handle full tank pressure, in the event of a complete failure of the propane regulator. Yes, if no failure, you are talking about under one PSI. But, that is NOT what safety dictates. The hose has to withstand full tank pressure, as it is not regulated down from the tank to the regulator.
Huntindog 01/23/15 12:35pm Tech Issues
RE: Quality Shore power cord

Don look at his signature he has a TT not a motorhome, probably uses a portable genny what he needs is a smaller shore cord, some 10ga (30amp) SJ all weather cord it does not have a Poly-vynal jacket that gets stiff in cold weather cord gauge depends on the size of this gennyWe have a winner!!!:B I have two EU 2000s. We often boondock for extended periods. Just returned from a 20 day trip. Temps got as low as 12 degrees. The generator runs a lot then. I have insulated and heat taped all of the underbelly plumbing, and it needs AC to keep the water flowing Not sure what cord my old one is, but it used to be flexible all the time. Age has taken it's toll.
Huntindog 01/23/15 12:30pm Tech Issues
Quality Shore power cord

My detachable Marinco power cord is getting harder to coil in cold weather. Is there a better quality one available?
Huntindog 01/22/15 05:56pm Tech Issues
RE: Stainless propane hoses

I am very disappointed in how long the rubber hoses last... I have had to replace them a lot. If their is a better quality hose available.. I am interested. I had just heard about the stainless ones a couple of weeks ago. Not sure how long they have been on the market, but would like to hear some feedback from THOSE that have USED them.
Huntindog 01/22/15 05:42pm Tech Issues
RE: Equal-i-zer hitch choices

The right size is the right size. With the logic some are using, I bet they buy oversized shoes, as they would get more for their money. There is a reason that they make different sized bars. I can't speak for other WD hitches, but in the case of the Equal-I-Zer, it doesn't matter if you use higher-rated setup with a lighter trailer. Generally, the lighter setup does cost less, and perhaps that is the "reason" for the different size bars; however, if OP finds a heavier-rated one at a discounted rate, there's no harm there. Several threads on here and other forums where people have inquired with the manufacturer and they say it's fine to do so. Personal experience, my 1400/14000 setup tows my 5000lbs trailer just fine for the past 2 years. I see it as having room to grow should I choose a bigger TT next time around. And yes, I buy oversized shoes for the kids so I don't have to buy them again in 6 months because they grow so fast. :)My parents did the same for me... I hated it. By the time the shoes fit, they were worn out. So they never really fit me. And just like the shoe example, an oversized bar will never really be right, and CAN in some cases cause harm to the TT frame. One of my TTs said so right in the manual. It gave ratings for bars based on the thickness of the frames. With many of todays lightweight frames on TTs, I would be cautious about recommending over sized bars... Just because it has worked for you on your TT, doesn't mean it will for others and their TTs. Certain things need to be sized right. I like my shoes to fit, and my WD bars to fit as well
Huntindog 01/22/15 12:35pm Towing
RE: Tires for my travel trailer

Apparently there isn't any benefit running E rated tires at 65#. I don't see any reason to. They achieve their max weight rating at 80#, and that's what I air them to.There is some benefit. The E tire will have more plies and that makes it more resistant to punctures. I once had a sharp rock on a gravel road do in a LRC tire. I was going very slow approaching our campsite, with the windows down and heard the pop. The rock wasn't very big at all, just a loose sharp rock in the perfect position to do in the tire.
Huntindog 01/22/15 12:27pm Travel Trailers
RE: Equal-i-zer hitch choices

The right size is the right size. With the logic some are using, I bet they buy oversized shoes, as they would get more for their money. There is a reason that they make different sized bars.
Huntindog 01/21/15 05:58pm Towing
RE: Do you leave your diesel running ...?

The 18 wheelers can point to the wear on their starter motor and batteries vs the teaspoon of diesel fuel needed to idle for 20 minutes. We've all seen semi's with an idling engine, at the fuel pump, stopped at a delivery, overnighting... Funny thing is that I haven't been able to point to any specific reason why they do it anymore. Anytime we get a freight delivery from a major commercial carrier, they shut the engine off when the get out of the truck. Even its only for a few minutes, they still do it. Look at the smaller companies that do commercial hauling, and their drivers leave it running. Look at the owner-operator and he turns it off. I once had an owner-operator tell me that if someone's leaving it running, its because they don't own it and don't pay the fuel. So who really knows.n old friend of mine drives 18 wheelers for a living. He used to shut them off. Then one time when it was VERY inconvienient, it wouldn't start. He never shut one off again, till it was time to go home. For me, the answer is yes, I leave it running. For me, the answer is not, I don't leave it running. Really, though, it just depends on what I'm doing. If I'm hopping out for a quick top-off, then I let her run. On a cold morning when the truck hasn't reached operating temp yet, or on a hot day when I want to keep the cab cool, I let her run. At a fast-food drive through or bank line, I turn it off (for the other people). But my truck fuels better with less air-lock when its not running, so I almost always shut down for a complete fill up. I let me gas vehicles run all the time when I'm fueling. Always have. But I never shut down my diesel if my EGT's are still high.
Huntindog 01/21/15 05:47pm Tow Vehicles
RE: BATTERY LIFESPAN survey...

Surveys such as this are really kind of useless. Battery life is totally dependant on usage. Just because I get say, 6 years out out of a certain battery doesn't mean that you will. No two peoples usage will be the same. I can say that under my USAGE, I have never gotten much more than a year out of a 12 volt. And I have had twe 6 volts going strong at 6 years when I sold the TT. We boondock a LOT. Probably spend at least 60 days a year in the TT.
Huntindog 12/30/14 01:43am Tech Issues
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