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 > Your search for posts made by 'Huntindog' found 524 matches.

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RE: Greasing bearings question

As I mentioned my opinion of dealer service is not very high. Twice, from two different dealers, I asked for a brake inspection and bearing packing and both time all I got was a cursory look at the pad wear and the bearing lubed through the Zerk. I was not cheap either. What was disappointing was the reason the brake pads showed little wear was they were half frozen up with grit and grime. Also rather than pack the bearings by hand they just remounted the drum and greased it through the Zerk. Finally I had a brake magnet fail and decided it was time for "man up" and do it myself. It was messy but at least I knew it was done the way I like it.This is why I have been doing as much of my own work as possible for many years. It seems that every time I pay someone to do something, I am disappointed in the results. And it costs a lot for that as well. At least when I do something, it gets done right, or I screw it up and then fix it right, for a lot less money. This applies to more than just RVs.
Huntindog 06/28/17 08:31am Travel Trailers
RE: Greasing bearings question

I recently had a bearing failure after a quick inspection 2 months earlier. I removed 2 of the 4 drums and found plenty of grease on the bearings but I didn't clean and fully examine the bearings. They had the original black grease in Lippert axles 5 years old. I replaced the bearings and brakes on the failed unit at a campsite and then inspected the other 3 more thoroughly when I got home. As it turns out 3 of the 4 were bad (galled rollers on the outer bearings). All new now with red grease #2. Just greasing from the zerk fitting will not reveal the true condition of the bearings. Also, you should not mix different types of grease. Do you know what is currently being used before adding your grease? Lippert apparently used a black grease and the new Dexter drum/bearing assembly came with red grease. That's my recent history; hope it helps someone to avoid a catastrophic failure. I don't know if it is relevant or not but my 3 prior trailers all had Dexter axles and zero failures. I've always done my own bearing maintenance over the past 21 years. My Lippert axles came with red grease.... It of course will turn black with use.
Huntindog 06/27/17 06:55pm Travel Trailers
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

Another EZ lube fail Sadly, a search will turn up MANY such cases.
Huntindog 06/27/17 10:58am Tech Issues
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

My only question is this, have you honestly actually personally used the EZlube system?I own one. I will not use it.
Huntindog 06/26/17 06:29pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

If you have the EZ Lube hubs, the zerk is there to purge the bearings and hub of old grease and replace it with new grease. BUT. You must do it correctly. And that means using a hand pump and pumping the grease very slowly while continuously turning the wheel. The grease is ported behind the inner bearing, then flows thru that bearing as it is turning, thru the hub, thru the outer bearing, and out the front of the hub around the zerk. That pushes all the old grease out. When you see new grease coming out the front you know all the old grease has been replaced. If you pump too hard or don't turn the wheel the pressure may push grease past the seal. A pump or two does nothing toward getting new grease to the outer bearing. It takes a lot of grease to do it correctly. Google ezlube for videos and how-to information if that is what you have. Not quite correct. Here is the facts on how this works. The zerk feeds a hole that will attempt to grease the inner bearing. How well this will work depends on the condition of the seal/hub interface, and the skill of the person doing it. He needs to slowly turn the wheel while steadyling pumping the grease... It is working blind as you cannot see what is really going on in there. Is the fresh grease getting evenly distributed in the bearing? Or are spots being missed/skipped? Is the seal really in good shape? or is grease seeping past it onto the brakes? One simply cannot be sure. All seals age and leak at some point. Sometimes a brand new seal is nicked during installation... Without superman vision, one cannot know. But the potential problems don't stop there. In order to grease the outer bearing, the grease must travel thru the inner bearing, and the hub cavity to the inside of the outer bearing. This takes a considerable amount of grease... Several tubes each time for a dual axle TT... That's right EACH TIME... The video on Dexters site is misleading. The dirty grease that they show exiting the hub is only from the outer bearing. The dirty grease from the larger inner bearing is still in there some where.... Some of it may have even made it to the inside of the outer bearing!! Without xray vision, one cannot know exactly where it is... So one must keep pumping and pumping and pumping,, until a second section of dirty grease emerges. Even then one cannot know if all the dirty grease is purged. It is a long trip for the grease, and it probably will not travel evenly around the hub.. With all of the pumping that must be done, a compromised seal will likely fail greasing the brakes... But hey, I hear that well greased brakes never wear out.:B So you see it is not as simple as the marketing makes it out to be. Now knowing all of the facts, if one still wants to use this "feature" I wish them well. Interesting description of the process. You say without xray vision you cannot see what is going on. And yet you are describing an exact grease flow thru the bearings and hub that can't be seen. Is that info from some legitimate research study on the system? Or is this your interpretation of the process? Would like to see a link to a research study if available. Not at all. Watch the Dexter video. It shows precisely what I am describing. But notice that it says you are done when the dirty grease turns clean... But you likely are not done then. The dirty grease they show is from the outer bearing. The dirty grease from the inner bearing is still in there. The unkown is just where it is. Without Xray vision, no one can say. It could be in the cavity somewhere, or it may have reached the outer bearing... In which case the outer bearing would have old dirty grease in it.. Not to mention there is no way to see if the inner seal held perfectly, or if grease seeped past it where it will end up on the brakes.... Lots of reports of this happening. Bottom line is it makes for a great marketing pitch, but actual performance is not a certainty. Use it at your own risk. And I will disagree one last time. The new grease is ported behind the inner bearing. The only way it gets to the cavity of the hub is thru that inner bearing. That means the first thing it does is push the old grease out of that bearing replacing it with new grease. And all the new grease following that continues to flow thru that bearing as it pushes all the old grease in the hub cavity out thru the outer bearing and the front of the hub. After all the old grease is pushed out the front of the hub, new grease starts to come out, as can be determined by a definite change in color. And that new grease is now passing thru the outer bearing, meaning the outer bearing ( like the inner bearing) is now filled with new grease. Been there, done that. Your turn. You get last word.You are not understanding correctly. In a perfect scenario, you start out with a brand new hub/bearings that completely filled with grease. As the miles add up. the grease in the bearings becomes worn, dirty. A slight amount from wear, but mostly from the inner and outer seals allowing some contaminents to enter. The grease between the bearings stays pretty much clean. (I know this from years of repacking brearings. I always coat the spindle with grease just as a rust preventative, and it is always clean when I do it again) Along you come with a grease gun. The grease you pump in DOES indeed push out the dirty grease from the inner bearing (assuming all goes well with your technique, and the inner seal holds up). This new grease pushes the old inner bearing grease towards the outer bearing and it's dirty grease. That grease exits followed by some clean grease that was in the middle of the hub... You call it done, as the Dexter video does.... But the dirty grease from the inner bearing is STILL in there somewhere. It could be in the middle, or it could have made it into the outer bearing, and just hasn't exited yet. There is no way to know for sure just where it is, and if it really all moved along the hub at the same rate.. In a perfect scenario, you would look for TWO areas of dirty grease to exit.... But this is not a perfect situation. You will be hard pressed to maintain even pumping for as long as it will take, and there may be air gaps in the hub cavity as well. So the inner bearing grease stands a really good chance of not completely exiting, even if you do it perfectly. Also, it is highly unlikely that it came from the factory with the hubs completely filled with grease. Lots of reports on this. And most report needing 3.5-4 tubes to completely fill the hubs on a dual axle TT. That means you would need to use that much grease EVERYTIME for a complete grease change.... Then there is the ever present danger of a seal failure allowing the grease to coat the brakes. You can NEVER be sure that it did not occur. You find out when the brakes stop working.-
Huntindog 06/26/17 01:50pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

If you have the EZ Lube hubs, the zerk is there to purge the bearings and hub of old grease and replace it with new grease. BUT. You must do it correctly. And that means using a hand pump and pumping the grease very slowly while continuously turning the wheel. The grease is ported behind the inner bearing, then flows thru that bearing as it is turning, thru the hub, thru the outer bearing, and out the front of the hub around the zerk. That pushes all the old grease out. When you see new grease coming out the front you know all the old grease has been replaced. If you pump too hard or don't turn the wheel the pressure may push grease past the seal. A pump or two does nothing toward getting new grease to the outer bearing. It takes a lot of grease to do it correctly. Google ezlube for videos and how-to information if that is what you have. Not quite correct. Here is the facts on how this works. The zerk feeds a hole that will attempt to grease the inner bearing. How well this will work depends on the condition of the seal/hub interface, and the skill of the person doing it. He needs to slowly turn the wheel while steadyling pumping the grease... It is working blind as you cannot see what is really going on in there. Is the fresh grease getting evenly distributed in the bearing? Or are spots being missed/skipped? Is the seal really in good shape? or is grease seeping past it onto the brakes? One simply cannot be sure. All seals age and leak at some point. Sometimes a brand new seal is nicked during installation... Without superman vision, one cannot know. But the potential problems don't stop there. In order to grease the outer bearing, the grease must travel thru the inner bearing, and the hub cavity to the inside of the outer bearing. This takes a considerable amount of grease... Several tubes each time for a dual axle TT... That's right EACH TIME... The video on Dexters site is misleading. The dirty grease that they show exiting the hub is only from the outer bearing. The dirty grease from the larger inner bearing is still in there some where.... Some of it may have even made it to the inside of the outer bearing!! Without xray vision, one cannot know exactly where it is... So one must keep pumping and pumping and pumping,, until a second section of dirty grease emerges. Even then one cannot know if all the dirty grease is purged. It is a long trip for the grease, and it probably will not travel evenly around the hub.. With all of the pumping that must be done, a compromised seal will likely fail greasing the brakes... But hey, I hear that well greased brakes never wear out.:B So you see it is not as simple as the marketing makes it out to be. Now knowing all of the facts, if one still wants to use this "feature" I wish them well. Interesting description of the process. You say without xray vision you cannot see what is going on. And yet you are describing an exact grease flow thru the bearings and hub that can't be seen. Is that info from some legitimate research study on the system? Or is this your interpretation of the process? Would like to see a link to a research study if available. Not at all. Watch the Dexter video. It shows precisely what I am describing. But notice that it says you are done when the dirty grease turns clean... But you likely are not done then. The dirty grease they show is from the outer bearing. The dirty grease from the inner bearing is still in there. The unkown is just where it is. Without Xray vision, no one can say. It could be in the cavity somewhere, or it may have reached the outer bearing... In which case the outer bearing would have old dirty grease in it.. Not to mention there is no way to see if the inner seal held perfectly, or if grease seeped past it where it will end up on the brakes.... Lots of reports of this happening. Bottom line is it makes for a great marketing pitch, but actual performance is not a certainty. Use it at your own risk.
Huntindog 06/25/17 09:00pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

Quite a few of us think that the Dexter recommendation of 12K is a generic one. If you read the manual, it does NOT differentiate for different types of service.. IOW, Boat trailer axles get the same recommendation as TT axles... Even though the conditions that they operate under are way different.
Huntindog 06/25/17 06:27pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

Everyone thanks so much for the input. The nice part about this forum is you can ask and find people with way more knowledge then you have on a subject. This was an eye opener for this old boy. I do have the Dexter EZ lube setup and I guess I didn't have a clue to the required maintenance for them. I did as suggested a search on you tube and found a video from Dexter and it stated jack it up and rotate the tire slowly while pumping grease slowly until you see the new grease come out the front. That would have been the last thing I would have done fearing blowing grease out the seals. I guess that will be my new spring project each year from now on. Who says you can't teach and old dog new tricks. I am humbled one more time. I learned something, thanks again. BobUmm.. Did you miss the post I did right before your last one? The Dexter video only shows part of the story.
Huntindog 06/25/17 05:00pm Tech Issues
RE: How much grease for wheel bearings?

If you have the EZ Lube hubs, the zerk is there to purge the bearings and hub of old grease and replace it with new grease. BUT. You must do it correctly. And that means using a hand pump and pumping the grease very slowly while continuously turning the wheel. The grease is ported behind the inner bearing, then flows thru that bearing as it is turning, thru the hub, thru the outer bearing, and out the front of the hub around the zerk. That pushes all the old grease out. When you see new grease coming out the front you know all the old grease has been replaced. If you pump too hard or don't turn the wheel the pressure may push grease past the seal. A pump or two does nothing toward getting new grease to the outer bearing. It takes a lot of grease to do it correctly. Google ezlube for videos and how-to information if that is what you have. Not quite correct. Here is the facts on how this works. The zerk feeds a hole that will attempt to grease the inner bearing. How well this will work depends on the condition of the seal/hub interface, and the skill of the person doing it. He needs to slowly turn the wheel while steadyling pumping the grease... It is working blind as you cannot see what is really going on in there. Is the fresh grease getting evenly distributed in the bearing? Or are spots being missed/skipped? Is the seal really in good shape? or is grease seeping past it onto the brakes? One simply cannot be sure. All seals age and leak at some point. Sometimes a brand new seal is nicked during installation... Without superman vision, one cannot know. But the potential problems don't stop there. In order to grease the outer bearing, the grease must travel thru the inner bearing, and the hub cavity to the inside of the outer bearing. This takes a considerable amount of grease... Several tubes each time for a dual axle TT... That's right EACH TIME... The video on Dexters site is misleading. The dirty grease that they show exiting the hub is only from the outer bearing. The dirty grease from the larger inner bearing is still in there some where.... Some of it may have even made it to the inside of the outer bearing!! Without xray vision, one cannot know exactly where it is... So one must keep pumping and pumping and pumping,, until a second section of dirty grease emerges. Even then one cannot know if all the dirty grease is purged. It is a long trip for the grease, and it probably will not travel evenly around the hub.. With all of the pumping that must be done, a compromised seal will likely fail greasing the brakes... But hey, I hear that well greased brakes never wear out.:B So you see it is not as simple as the marketing makes it out to be. Now knowing all of the facts, if one still wants to use this "feature" I wish them well.
Huntindog 06/25/17 04:38pm Tech Issues
RE: 2019 Silverado Diesel

http://www.off-road.com/blog/2017/06/23/2019-chevy-silverado-diesel-confirmed-in-spy-shots/ Sorry if this has been posted already. It always cracks me up that manufacturers parade these trucks around with cloth/canvas covers on everything to "hide" the new model. Really? Rolling through the gas station like that is sure to avoid attention :SThey gotta get some real world testing done somehow. Would you really wanna buy ones that were only tested on closed circuit. private courses? That would make us all beta testers with HUGE investments in new totally unproven models. Besides, it gives us something to talk about.
Huntindog 06/24/17 02:46am Tow Vehicles
RE: Real Weights

Canadians use both , and can convert. Not me, I never refer to anything in kg, nor would I ever refer to fuel mileage rated in Imperial gallons or even litres per 100 km, the stupidest form of metric measure. rv.net is a US based forum with the vast majority of members being Americans, it only makes sense to use US measure, whether volume, weight, whatever. :R That said, what's the point of your original post? - I've yet to see any trailer where it's actual stickered dry weight won't be noticeably higher than it's listed brochure weight - big surprise. What is surprising is how just 2 adults could find it necessary to load so much additional weight into the trailer, making the end result far heavier than it really needs to be. :EDifferent people have different needs.
Huntindog 06/23/17 05:54pm Travel Trailers
RE: Real Weights

When guys and gals are looking at purchasing a TT,they look at the brochure . But to get an idea of reality, our brochure weight dry was 4100#, the factory out the door sticker was 4600# dry ,when I ran it over the scale,fully loaded for an across Canada trip,the two axles were 2830 kg.(2.2lb=1kg). This is all a so what to me, I switched out the axles to 5200# and the tires to either 2700# or 2900# truck, 16" 10plys .And I pull with a diesel 1ton. But someone with a 1/2 ton, might not have a so what attitude driving down the road. This is 6226 lb loaded. Which means you are carrying a LOT of stuff---1626 lb. Unless that is batteries and water... I can't imagine where in a TT you would put that much weight. I can probably double that easy. And since most NEVER scale their TTs, they really have non idea how much weight they have actually added.
Huntindog 06/23/17 03:05pm Travel Trailers
RE: Tire upgrade air preasure?

I recently replaced the d rated Goodyear marathons with the new e rated Goodyear e rated endurance tires. The tire pressure on the the original d rated marathons were 65 lbs as listed on the factory sticker but the newer e rated tires max preasure is now 80 lbs. I'm courius what others have done when upgrading to a larger capacity tire. Right now I just met in the middle with about 72-73 lbs (the wheels are rated for 80 lbs) but not sure what would be best.There are basically two advantages to moving from a D to an E tire/ 1. Heavier duty construction. 2. More capacity. The caveat is that you only get the increased capacity if you air the Es to 80. Increased capacity IS generally desireable. In the case of a road hazard with tires just barely enough for the load, the remaining tire will be overloaded and should be replaced as well. With more capacity, this becomes less of an issue. So run them at 80.
Huntindog 06/21/17 05:47pm Travel Trailers
RE: Changing an Axle

Thanks for the info. The TT came with Lippert 3,500 lb axles but when I look at etrailer.com it looks like they only sell Dexter and they aren't "plug and play" so I wouldn't be able to just unbolt one and put the new one on. I did look at the website for Johnson Surplus and see they do carry the Lippert. Someone mentioned them, does anyone had experience with them? Honestly it almost seems too cheap compared to the Dexter or am I comparing apples to oranges? On both the Dexter and Lippert that I've found, they all look like they mount above the leaf springs but on my current setup they are below the leaf spring. Other than lowering the trailer a few inches, any other advantages or disadvantages to going with a setup that has the axle above the leaf spring? Thinking that as long as I am doing the work it might be work replacing everything. Also, if I replace both axles, how do I know I have them aligned currently? Doing a little reading it looks like they are supposed to be within something like 1/16th of an inch for the alignment. How can I do that at home? I appreciate all the advice. I really want to do this myself because of the cost but need to be comfortable with it. Thanks.Alignment is usually set when the spring hangers are welded to the TT frame. So long as the spring perches are welded on the axle tubes correctly as well. then it is set, and no ordinary alignment is needed. Or possible for that matter. (some people believe in bending a undamaged axle to make up for errors in welding or there is at least one product that will allow for some aspects to be changed) If you have the axles made to your specs, they can weld the perches on for you in their jig. IOW, it should be perfect. That leaves the spring hangers.You can do the measuring method, or go by by how it performed before the axles were bent... If the tire wear was OK then, that means it should be OK now. Doing it this way means that if a future axle replacement is needed it can simply be bolted in. Vs. swapping in a axle custom bent to match the old one.. Axles can need replacing due to bearing problems, road hazards etc.
Huntindog 06/20/17 05:55pm Travel Trailers
RE: 15k BTU AC on Parallel Hondas?

Huntingdog Do you mean eCon mode No generator is running at idle while powering the A/CWhatever. I think it is called idle control.. At any rate it is definatly NOT full throttle. And they will throttle up and down as additional loads such as the microwave come on and off.
Huntindog 06/18/17 02:40am Tech Issues
RE: 15k BTU AC on Parallel Hondas?

My Honda's have run my 15K Dometic @ 9000'. If I turned the Tstat all the way down so it would never cycle the compressor, I could run them at idle after the intial startup.
Huntindog 06/17/17 07:58pm Tech Issues
RE: looking at a Puma or Rockwood. Opinions please!

I have a Sabre, which is made by Palomino as well. It is considered the higher end of the two, but I would buy either one again
Huntindog 06/17/17 07:48pm Travel Trailers
RE: Forest River takes their ball and go's home.

There may be some confusion to this story. I read in the Wall Street journal that Berkshire (owner of F.R.) is in hot water in Texas. It seems there is a law there baring auto dealerships and manufacturers from sharing ownership. Since Berkshire also owns some car dealerships, they are (according to the DMV) in violation. Many states have similar laws, but they are more specific. For example: Chevrolet cannot both manufacture and operate dealerships in the same state... Obviously, DMV in Texas is taking advantage of a poorly written law to go after them. It is being contested in court. Hopefully either the court rules in Berkshires favor, or the legislature fixes the law, as there are many other similar situations that this law could then be applied to, if DMV prevails. If DMV prevails, I could see something like F.R. pulling out of Texas happening.
Huntindog 06/16/17 10:43pm Travel Trailers
RE: When to replace 6v batteries

I'm of the what seems to be the minority camp here. I do not baby sit my batteries other than keeping the acid levels up. I just let the converter handle it. Been doing that with two TTs and three different converter brands... WFCO was replaced due to never going into float.. 13.6 at 115 degrees in Phoenix is not a good match. I use the 6 volts because they last lot longer for me than the 12s ever did. I never had a 12 make it's second birthday. 5 years is pretty normal for the sixes. Maybe I could squeeze some more out of them with better life support, but with Costco selling them so cheap... I have better things to do.
Huntindog 06/16/17 09:09pm Tech Issues
RE: Changing an Axle

I did the upgrade,from 3500#s to 5200#s. It wasn't so simple. A quote from Captain Obvious," If it bent, it wasn't heavy enough. " The 3500#s were over axle, the 5200# were under. 5200#s took 6 bolt 16" wheels and the shock mounts angled the other way. Well I went from 5200# to 7000#. It was a direct easy bolt in swap. The point is that the OP has a bent axle. So simply changing nothing other than just replacing it with the same one is a waste of money. Some axle upgrades will be harder than others. Just the nature of things mechanical... But if what you have is failing now... A change needs to be made.
Huntindog 06/16/17 08:50pm Travel Trailers
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