RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'Likes to tow' found 61 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 4  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Camping near Rocky Mountain National Park

Thinking about a trip to Rocky Mountain National Park in late May or early June of next year. What are some good campgrounds for a base camp for a few days. We like to drop off the 5th wheel and then take daily trips of 100 miles or less to see all the sights. I don't like to travel steep mountain grades with the 5th wheel. We will be coming in from Interstate 76 and prefer the Estes Park area. IMHO this is an OXYMORON - ROCKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK - Sorry but IMHO if you want to see the sights you have to Drive in the MOUNTAINS. Not sure I can be of any help. St Vrain SP out side Longmont might work. Right off I-25, not in the Mountains - 42 miles from Estes Park. We were over Monarch Pass this past June with no issues. However staying in really nice places without too many steep grades to travel just seems easier. Once I get set up and disconnected I could care less what the grade is. Best of Luck
Likes to tow 09/26/17 05:56am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
Camping near Rocky Mountain National Park

Thinking about a trip to Rocky Mountain National Park in late May or early June of next year. What are some good campgrounds for a base camp for a few days. We like to drop off the 5th wheel and then take daily trips of 100 miles or less to see all the sights. I don't like to travel steep mountain grades with the 5th wheel. We will be coming in from Interstate 76 and prefer the Estes Park area.
Likes to tow 09/25/17 03:17pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Jayco feedback

Lets face it, RV's are not built to rigid standards. They are designed by professional decorators and look beautiful but require lots of attention and maintenance by their owners. Many times after returning from a trip I see something I need to tighten, seal or repair. The appliances and fixtures are cheap light weight devices. The only RV's that are still made to rigid standards are made by Airstream and to purchase this brand you better be willing to fork out lots of money. Most manufacturers will push them out the door and let the purchaser and dealer work out the problems under the warranty. I believe there is little quality control to find leaks in plumbing and electrical issues. RV ownership requires constant attention to preventative maintenance.
Likes to tow 09/19/17 05:48am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Overall lenght question

Fifth wheels pull better....but differently. They will cut sharper than a bumper pull because the attachment is more forward. Thus you can curb them or run in the ditch somewhat easier. Also they react slower to steering wheel movement when backing up. Just keep this in mind and you can adjust to a fiver very easily.
Likes to tow 09/17/17 05:20am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Hwy 550 from Montrose, CO to Durango, CO

We drove this road in June but left our 5th wheel at a base camp near Ridgeway. I was shocked at the lack of guardrails. The white line on the edge of the road is only 3 inches from a straight down fall of hundreds of feet!! We met logging trucks coming at us from the other direction. Locals think nothing of this road. School buses even travel it! Lot of RV's of every type were traveling it too. This being said, it is one of the most beautiful roads we have ever traveled!! I was drawn to it like a moth to a fire. We drove it three times during our stay in the area. Just be careful and like someone else said take your jeep over it first before taking the big rig. The most scary part is just outside Ouray for about a few hundred yards. People have died on this road. A monument to a preacher and his daughters who went over the edge on their way to church in Silverton is a reminder of the danger. Also a monument to snow plow drivers who have paid the ultimate price to keeping the road open in winter. I would drive it again in a heart beat!!!
Likes to tow 09/03/17 06:02am Roads and Routes
RE: montana smoke

Smoke can ruin a trip into the West. This is why we stopped going in late summer. We now try to travel in June.
Likes to tow 08/11/17 07:24pm Roads and Routes
RE: Rubber roof is BILLOWING!

Just completed a 5000 mile trip west. Saw several 5th wheels coming at me in the opposite direction with the front rubber billowing up. These owners had no idea this was happening! There must be a leak somewhere along the front cap for air to be entering.
Likes to tow 07/30/17 04:42am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Fifth Wheel Lube Plate ????

I had one on my previous 5th wheel and it caused me to have problems while trying to hitch up.. The straight edge on the front of the trailer (just in front of the king pin) should contact the truck hitch and pivot it level for proper alignment. It "cams" the pivoting hitch to proper alignment. With the round teflon pad on there, it would sometimes not allow the Reese to pivot level and thus cause problems. I would sometimes get a "high hitch situation" where the king pin would end up on top of the jaws. I took it off and NEVER had any further issues. Don't use one on my new 5th wheel either.
Likes to tow 07/20/17 07:23am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Grand Design Reflection

Just completed a 5000 mile trip to Utah & Colorado. Our Reflection 27RL had no issues. Nothing come undone, nothing broke and after a very careful detailing and examination it looks like the day we bought it last November. This was the third trip. The first two were under 500 miles. They are well built!! We had a few issues after the first trip and received excellent response from Grand Design and our dealer. Things like we had can be expected on anything new and even our salesman told us to hit the road and then bring it back to allow them to correct any problems. I would buy another one in a heartbeat.
Likes to tow 07/04/17 08:38am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Dexter EZ Lube ISSUE RESLOVED bad gun

To all of you still using the EZ Lube feature on your axle be aware of the issues with this system!! If you have been pumping away with your grease gun and nothing comes out there is the possibility that the rear seal has blown out and your are lubing your brake shoes and magnet assemblies. I highly recommend you pull your brake drums and inspect for grease on the brakes~!!! There are significant amounts of opinions on using the easy lube system but most experienced Rv'ers will only hand pack the bearings. Easy Lube is wonderful for boat trailers that get submerged in water but useless on any trailer with brake actuators operating on the highway. Do a search on this and other forums about this issue and you will find an overwhelming number of people have had major issues with grease on their brakes. Look at the Grand Design owners forum and see the issue with Lippert and the massive replacement of complete brake assemblies due to grease getting past the seal. Uh, you may have read some posts on the GD forum but clearly not all of them because you're missing THE most important fact. The problems with leaking axle seals from the OEM have ZERO...I state again...ZERO relation to the EZlube system. The EZlube zerks are not touched at the factory! Do a test the day you opt to repack your bearings manually. Before you pull the hubs, try to force grease into the hub via EZlube zerk as fast and hard as you can. Try to blow that seal. You wont. It takes significant pressure to blow out an axle seal with a grease gun. And if it leaks any grease, well then it would leak (or is leaking) under normal use and its good you are replacing it! I did not mean to place blame on the Grand Design problem with EZ Lube system. It was only to show what can happen when you get grease on your brakes, however that may happen. Grand Design/Lippert problem was caused by bad thin grease with low dropping point, bad seals or the process of assembly.......who knows for sure, they have claimed many theories. I had the EZ lube system on my 2nd 5th wheel(Crossroads Cruiser) which I had purchased from an individual after he owned it two years. His statement to me was "I greased the bearings several times using a grease gun, never pulled the drums." My inspection, after realizing I had very little braking ability, was the brake clusters (shoes and magnets) were completely saturated with grease!!!
Likes to tow 06/04/17 04:50pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Dexter EZ Lube ISSUE RESLOVED bad gun

To all of you still using the EZ Lube feature on your axle be aware of the issues with this system!! If you have been pumping away with your grease gun and nothing comes out there is the possibility that the rear seal has blown out and your are lubing your brake shoes and magnet assemblies. I highly recommend you pull your brake drums and inspect for grease on the brakes~!!! There are significant amounts of opinions on using the easy lube system but most experienced Rv'ers will only hand pack the bearings. Easy Lube is wonderful for boat trailers that get submerged in water but useless on any trailer with brake actuators operating on the highway. Do a search on this and other forums about this issue and you will find an overwhelming number of people have had major issues with grease on their brakes. Look at the Grand Design owners forum and see the issue with Lippert and the massive replacement of complete brake assemblies due to grease getting past the seal.
Likes to tow 06/02/17 04:09am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Hitching Up to 5th Wheel

I have a Reese 16K which I have used now for 14 years. The instructions that came with the hitch instructs you to have the safety latch open but the handle in the closed position. As the king pin enters it pushes the jaws open, the handle will move outward and then as the jaws close the handle snaps back into place. I close the latch, put a pad lock through it and do a pull test. See instructions at this site http://www.reeseprod.com/content/downloads/installation/N30047.pdf When I bought my first 5th wheel the dealer instructed me to do it this way and I have never had an issue. I always do a pull test after raising the landing gear two inches.
Likes to tow 06/01/17 05:35am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Should we buy used 5th wheel

When you buy new, the moment you pull off the lot with all the paperwork laying beside you the value of the unit has gone down from $10,000 or more!! On our first two 5th wheels, the dealer gave us a 30 day warranty which we never used on either unit. The new 5th wheel has been back to the dealer twice and I have fixed things myself more than once. If you know how to look do not be afraid of a unit a couple of years old!! Delamination is one thing you need to understand. Watch some YouTube videos to learn about anything!!
Likes to tow 05/24/17 06:10am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Should we buy used 5th wheel

A 2-4 year old unit usually has all the bugs worked out and will cost considerably less. This is what I did on my first two 5th wheels. Last October we bought our first new one and since then I have had it back to the dealer multiple times to correct problems........leaking fresh water tank being the most critical. I have fixed many issues myself while on the road or at home. Yes a two to four year old unit is much better to buy if you can find what you want.....or something very close. They depreciate like crazy and someone else had all the agony of getting things done under warranty. One word of advice, be sure you inspect for leaks and always keep a close eye for caulking that needs to be replaced. This little issue with ownership will follow you regardless if you buy new or used !!!
Likes to tow 05/23/17 06:42am Fifth-Wheels
RE: How long for delamanation to happen?

You need to get a quality repair which would mean the wall has to be replaced. Accept no excuses. Delamination will kill the resale value of your trailer!!! Since this happened so quickly I would think it was defective from the manufacturing process. Let us know how this comes out.
Likes to tow 05/22/17 04:50am Fifth-Wheels
RE: traveling miles? how far in 1 day

We plan for about 300 but will sometimes do more. I like very very early starts so I can be off the road and in a campsite by 3 or 4 in the afternoon. Long evenings of dinner, rest and a walk thru the campground charges us up for another day.
Likes to tow 05/15/17 05:12am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Pipestem State Park West Virginia

You will not hear anything bad about Pipestem! It's a great RV park with great facilities. The short drive off the Interstate is not difficult. I would recommend you take a short drive to Sandstone Falls while in the area and also stop by for an ice creme at the Dairy Queen in Hinton. There you can find inside dinning with a beautiful view of the New River and sometimes see Bald Eagles along the river in the trees. This is a beautiful area!!
Likes to tow 04/19/17 04:59am Roads and Routes
RE: Why did you choose a 5th wheel

We have had 3 5th wheels and on this last purchase we came close to getting a Class C. Then I realized that I must pull a TOAD so we could have the ability to run around and sight see, shop and so forth. Then I realized that I would still be pulling a trailer behind the motor home. If trying to get away from pulling a trailer this would not work!! My research led me to find out my insurance would double on a motorhome. It would be worthless to me when not traveling. A pickup gives you a great vehicle for doing practically anything. It would be hard to go to Lowes and get my mulch and supplies and then load it in the motorhome. Long periods of not running a motorhome may be harmful to the engine and transmission so I would have this to contend with. Many Class C's have this awful problem with leaking around the cab over bunk. Look at any Class C under the mattress and you will see water stains! A fifth wheel has more livable space and storage. The truck I pull it with is used very frequently to pull my boat, haul anything the wife buys, gives us a usable 2nd vehicle in the driveway. If someday we decide to quit traveling and get a permanent campsite somewhere, the fifth wheel is perfect to put down permanently. I was already set up to pull a fifth wheel and had the right truck with a hitch. I was very experienced at pulling and backing trailers so there was no intimidation factor. I did not need a heavy truck with the Cummins diesel if I was not pulling a heavy trailer. Thus I would be selling it and the hitch and taking a big hit on depreciation, then looking for another truck. Then I would have three vehicles in the driveway, a car, pickup and motorhome. Motorhomes are very expensive and once they get to be a few years old nobody wants to buy it from you. I have a neighbor who has a 1991 34' Class A he can't give away. It only has 39,000 miles on the odometer!! Ended up being a no brainer for us. Other than the joy of driving down the interstate in a big motor home I could see no other advantage. Once I got off the highway and parked in a campground then what? I would have to rent a car or pull something to drive.......still pulling something.
Likes to tow 04/10/17 06:23am Fifth-Wheels
What seal tape to use

What is best to seal the Coroplast on the bottom of the trailer after it has been cut. Should I use Gorilla Tape or Eternabond tape???
Likes to tow 03/26/17 07:12pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why do Class C's always leak in the front upper bunk area?

Hi Likes-To-Tow, I post this once in a while and it seems to address your initial question. It is long-winded....my apologies for that. Ron ---------------------------------------------- New, used, or well used, when shopping for a conventional class B+ or C, the most important consideration is how it is constructed. This post outlines construction methods which are most affordable and methods that cost more, but are built to hold up much better to the elements and also the punishment of the road. Some motor home manufactures offer different levels of quality through their various model lines. Instead of providing a list of brands to consider, it is best to identify what "Better" is. When shopping for a motor home, don't get distracted with what I call "Eye Candy" or "Square Footage". You want to pay close attention to how the house is constructed. Water infiltration is the number one killer of motor homes, rotting them away long before anything is worn out. Once water gets inside, it is like termites. By the time you realize there is a problem, a lot of damage has already occurred. Also consider that mold & mildew can grow inside the walls which then you have a health hazard. My advise focuses on identifying a reliably well sealed motor home. #1 BEST (Very Expensive, Can Be 1.5 times the cost of Second Best) NO structural seam work. The brand Coach House is a fine example. It is seamless, made from a mold. The only places where water can leak is cutouts for windows, entry door, roof-top vents & a/c unit, storage compartments & maintenance access, all of which are in areas of very low stress. Because they have a seamless shell, these motor homes have a limited selection of sizes. #2 SECOND BEST Common, Affordable, & comes in Many Sizes so this is my main focus I own an example of this type. My Rig Here manufactured by Phoenix USA. Made in sections, but assembled in a way that greatly reduces the threat of water damage. Here are the good things you want to look for. a) Structural Seams Away From Corners When a motor home is driven, the house bounces, resonates, shakes, and leans countless times, representing a series of extended continuous earthquakes. Corner seams see greater stresses than seams located elsewhere. Corner seams are more easily split, especially when the caulk gets brittle with age & exposure to the sun. One extremely bad bump in the road can instantly breach a corner seam. Seams hold up much better when they are brought in from the corners in lesser stressed areas. b) A Seamless Over-The-Van Front Cap A huge bed above the van’s roof is the most vulnerable area of a motor home. No matter how well they are made, that long frontal over-hang resonates when the RV is driven. It is common for seams to split there, most troublesome with age & exposure to the elements. HERE is a more recent example, one of many I have read. The small front aerodynamic cap of a B+ design HERE eliminates the overhang which eliminates most of the resonation, along with most seam work. There are a few conventional “C” Designs (big over-van bed) where that area is seamless. If you absolutely must have that huge bed, then look for a seamless bucket-like design. Born Free offers a seamless bucket design as seen in This Model. The Itasca Navion Here is another fine example. Some manufactures as of late offer a partial bucket design with fewer seams located in less-stressed areas. Some manufacture models like the Minnie Winnie and the Nexus Phantom utilize a compromising partial bucket design, making it a better choice compared to a fully seamed cab-over bed. If you plan to accommodate more than 2 people, having that large extra cab-over bed will be extremely useful. c) A Crowned Roof Rain and snow melt runs off a crowned roof. A flat roof will sag over time, then water puddles around heavy roof-top items like the a/c unit. Water eventually finds it's way inside after gaskets & caulk have degraded from age, sun, and change in seasons. d) Rolled-Over-The-Edge seamless Fiberglass Roof Sheathing A single sheet of fiberglass as shown HERE that rolls over the right & left sides of the roof, down to the wall. The overlapping of fiberglass to the wall provides a good water seal and the fiberglass sheathing holds up better than roofs made of sheet rubber or thin plastic called TPO, which require more attention to keep your RV well protected. e) A Five Sided Rear Wall Cap A five sided back wall moves the seams around to the sides to areas of much less stress as seen HERE. The rear wall resembles a shallow rectangular cooking pan standing on it's side. Like the example, some rear wall sections are constructed with an integrated spare tire compartment and rear storage compartment. Not only are they convenience features, but that rear wall/cap offers a solid double-wall for exceptional strength which is more resistant to flexing the adjoining seam work. Don't be fooled. There are a select few manufactures who add rear wall sectional styling pieces over an entry level rear corner seam design which gives the appearance of a 5-sided pan design. You can easily tell by noting the sections & seams between them and the flat back wall that remains exposed. Bigger Will Be Weaker The size & floor plan you select MUST FIRST meet your needs before this consideration. The bigger the house, the weaker the structure will be. Consider two cardboard boxes made from the exact same corrugated material. The smaller box would naturally be stronger. It will be more resistant to bending, twisting, and other types of flexing. So if you are on the fence between models, the smaller one will be your stronger choice. Potentially Troublesome Construction Entry level motor homes are made with seams in corners and finished off with trim, including the massive cab-over bed. Their roof is flat and finished with rubber or TPO. They are most affordable, and come in all sizes. HERE is one such example. If considering this construction type, keep in-mind they require more regular care with bi-annual inspections. Plan to use a caulking gun now and then. When buying a used one, consider that you really don't know how well the previous owner maintained it. Buying new or used, that construction method will be counting on you to be a good non-neglectful owner. There are also the rare exception of the Lazy Daze which has seam work in the corners, but the substructure and sealing method is of the highest quality that it holds up like a seamless body. It's excellent sectional construction methods are not commonly found in other brands. I am no expert on this, but I'd give it a #1.5 Almost Like Best About The Chassis The most popular is the Ford E-Series with the V10 engine. The Sprinter diesel is a popular alternative to the E350 in the smaller sizes. Also within this past year is the recent introduction of the Ford Transit. The GM chassis is not popular, but is a very good choice for the right application. Any of these chassis made since 1998 are real good, new or used. If you plan to tow a car or heavy trailer, be aware that the Sprinter & Transit will be least powered. People who tow with them naturally take it slower. If considering a current-day “small” class B+ or C motor home, here is a comparison between the two current main contenders, the Sprinter with the V6 diesel engine and the Ford E350 with the V10 gasoline engine. Advantages Of The Mercedes Sprinter With Diesel Engine - Offers a 35%-50% improvement in fuel economy over the Ford-V10, when both are loaded and driven identically. - More ergonomic driver compartment with more leg room. - Comfort continues with a car-like feel & quiet ride. - A grander view out the windshield - Made by Mercedes which people are attracted to. Advantages Of The Ford E350 with V10 Engine - Given identical motor homes both brand and model, the Ford is around $13,000 MSRP cheaper - The Ford V10 engine has 50% more horse power and torque - The Ford E350 chassis handles 1430 pounds more weight. - The E350 is able to tow a heavier load. - The E350 rear axle is significantly wider which translates to better stability. - In most places traveled, gasoline costs less than diesel fuel - The Sprinter diesel has limited mechanical service shops around North America - The Sprinter diesel is typically outfitted with a propane generator. Propane is a critical fuel for RV operations, and generally needs to be rationed when dry camping. - This Next Point Is Debatable But Still Worth Noting....The V6 Sprinter diesel engine is not allowed to idle for extended periods. This limitation is detrimental when you need a/c but there are generator restrictions or you are dangerously low on propane, or you have a mechanical failure with the generator or roof a/c. The Ford V10 can safely idle for hours on end, heating, cooling, and battery charging, all valuable if you have a baby, pets, or health/respiratory issues. You decide what your priorities are, and pick the appropriate chassis. There are some really sweet motor homes being built exclusively on the Sprinter chassis, such as the Winnebago Via, View and View Profile. Others like Phoenix USA build their model 2350 and 2400 on both the Sprinter and Ford E350. They will even build it on the heaviest duty E450 upon request for a nominal fee. People who request an E450 for a small motor home, tow heavier things like for example, a multi-horse trailer. You can even special order a E350 & E450 4x4. There is so much cool stuff offered in recent years on the Sprinter and most recently on the new Ford Transit. The Ford Transit Chassis This chassis has the potential to dominate the class B+ & C motor home market in the smaller sizes. According to Ford's website, the Transit DRW chassis is offered in the 156", and 178" wheel base, and is rated as high as 10,360 GVWR. Ford offers a motor home package specific for the RV industry. It's diesel engine compares to the Sprinter in power and fuel economy, but is more affordable and is easily serviced at Ford service centers, just like the E350/E450. The cab has a much lower stance than the Sprinter making it much more friendly to get into and out from for people in their later years. It's more like a mini-van rather than a standard van. The Transit's lower cab also offers roomier over-head bunks that are easier to access. The Dodge Promaster 3500 Cut-Away Chassis This front wheel drive chassis is another recent entry in the RV industry. I am concerned over it's lack of load capability as reflected with single free-wheeling rear wheels. I have been reading posts written by new Promaster RV owners stating they are over-weight with just two people, some personal effects and food. They say they can't carry water and never a 3rd person. I would not be comfortable with such a limited load range in a B+ or C. This chassis does seem ideal for the straight "B" motor home market. The Chevy 3500/4500 Chassis Unfortunately this chassis is not more popular, primarily because GM sort-of gave up on competing with the Ford E350/E450. It offers more interior comfort than the Ford, but not as much as the Sprinter. It's power & weight ratings are a little less than their Ford counter-parts making them a great chassis for all but the heaviest of class Cs. They are also a little better on fuel consumption. One thing to keep in-mind, if you are counting inches in storing your rig, the Chevy is a little longer than the Ford by a number of inches which was critical for us with our garage as seen HERE with our Ford 2007 E350 rig. That could be the reason why the Chevy has a little more interior driver/passenger leg room. Engine Power Ratings of Ford, MB-Sprinter, Chevy, and Dodge Ford E350/E450 - 6.8L-V10, 305hp, 420ft Ford Transit Diesel - 3.2L-I5, 185hp, 350ft Mercedes Sprinter Diesel - 3.0L-V6, 188hp, 325ft Chevy 3500/4500 - 6.0L-V8, 323hp, 373ft Dodge Promaster - 3.6L-V6 (GVW only 9,300 pounds) This was well written and very accurate. The observations were factural and noteworthy. I hope anyone considering a Class C will think about this before buying. Before we purchased our current 5th wheel I was seriously considering a class B or B+. I was....not my wife. It's hard to get a woman to give up floor space, counter space and closet space. They could care less about quality construction. I will force her to review this great write up and think about it when the time comes to stop towing and get into a motor home. Thanks for your time and knowledge.
Likes to tow 03/26/17 06:26pm Class C Motorhomes
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 4  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2017 CWI, Inc. © 2017 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS