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 > Your search for posts made by 'Terryallan' found 493 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Speedometer

Also, IF it becomes a very expensive fix. Get a GPS, stick it on the dash, and use it for a speedometer
Terryallan 01/16/18 04:17pm Forum Technical Support
RE: Newbie: Towing TT w/ 2008 Toyota Sequoia

As all know. I am a great fan of 1500, and F150 trucks, and they tow GREAT when you keep them inside their weight limits. YOU are over that limit. You are in 2500, or F250 range. For that TT, You IMOP will need a socalled 3/4 ton truck
Terryallan 01/16/18 04:15pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Rain, Leak, Dicor but... what happening in walls?

Next question. what are the walls made of? More problems if Luan. No wall problem if AZDEL.
Terryallan 01/16/18 06:29am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Comparing Ram 1500s

Honestly. Unless you have one of the really low payload Rams. you should be fine. Your TT prolly will never weigh 7400lb anyway, unless it starts out high to begin with. We towed our 7400lb GVWR TT with a 5.4, 3.55, F150. Did a great job. However. It weighs only in the 5800 to 6000lb range loaded ready to camp. Try to keep your weight to 6000 or so, and you will be good to go
Terryallan 01/15/18 04:21pm Tow Vehicles
RE: State Park Stay Limitations-how to deal?

Hello, we would like to retire with our rv full-time. We plan to stay in state/national parks and on federal lands such as BLM, state forests, etc. and do not plan on using any private campgrounds or rv parks. Our question to all of you is this: How do you deal with the stay limitations of most state and national parks? I can't imagine picking up and moving every 14 days. We would like to stay in a lot of places for more than that time. I know some people "pick up" and go down the street to another location and then come back, but I can't imagine doing that or how unsettling it must be to have to keep moving and hope there's a spot, then come back. That doesn't seem relaxing at all. Please let us know how you full timers handle this particular issue, we would appreciate any and all advice. Thanks! Best advise. Play by the rules. you want to stay in one place. Find a seasonal site in a seasonal RV park. At least you would be able to keep the RV clean
Terryallan 01/12/18 05:33pm Full-time RVing
RE: Advice for South East points of Interest

Hello everyone and thank you for reading and responding to my post. This coming spring, we will be traveling from Austin, TX to Burlington Vermont spending a few weeks passing through the areas of the Great Smoky Mtn NP, Shenandoah NP, Blue Ridge Parkway, etc. Our route will focus on Alabama, Tennessee, Georgia, Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. Thanks so much for your input, Stuart & Leslie Just so you will know. The majority of the Blue ridge Parkway is in NC. None in Tenn, or Georgia, with the slightly shorter Northern Leg in VA. Not saying the VA section isn't pretty. But you will miss the Viaduct, Cherokee, Little Switzerland, Boone, Blowing Rock, and well everything that the NC High Country has to offer.
Terryallan 01/09/18 12:30pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Fighting for campsites 6 months in advance!

You are kidding, you had trouble booking a site for the 4th of July? Kidding, Right!. July 4th week in this area is booked solid 12 months in advance, and at Myrtle Beach. All the CGs are booked solid from June thru Sept. I agree with others. More people camping, less sites to chose from.
Terryallan 01/08/18 12:57pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: JACKING UP YOUR T/T

THANKS everyone, I'll be getting a Trailer Aid soon. I didn't know anything like that was available. I need to get out a little more. Jay D. Before you do. Check out your TT suspension. Raising the good tire does not always work. Many TT have floating axles, My first one did. You could not raise one tire with the other, unless you raised it 2 feet or so. not practical. Especially if you have the spread axles. I used a jack on the spring mount at the wheel. Never use a jack out on the axle. You could bend it,
Terryallan 01/08/18 08:01am Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

Pay load is the weight a truck can carry AFTER you subtract it's weight from the GVWR. And there is nothing you can do aside from rebuilding the vehicle, To change that HAHAHAHAHA! Classic ignorance. Your definition is based on the showroom stickers - and you don't understand what went into the numbers. You don't seem to get that the numbers are based on components - and you can change components to imrpove numbers. As I said earlier, there is an entire industry dedicated to improving towing capability. They exist as proof that it is cheaper to upgrade components on a truck you own vs buying $omething different. Knew you didn't know, and now you proved it:B:R:S:E
Terryallan 01/08/18 07:54am Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

So I've been reading the comments but i have been hesitant to even engage this group any more. There has been alot of good information in this thread, and I found the missing piece where my truck is lacking, mainly payload capacity. I have had assumptions made on my intent, intelligence, capabilities, and ability to understand what was discussed here. I get notifications of every single post, and have been reading. I haven't had much to add yet, since I haven't been able to get out to the scales. I came here as I have a general understanding, but not a ton of experience with anything this heavy. No, I am not going to negligently endanger my family or anyone else. Safety is why I am here asking for this help. We don't own the trailer yet, but my wife really wants it. I am just trying to sort out what I need to do to make this happen. I am considering a purchase of a 3/4 ton available in my area. Do NOT assume that I am a fool that will ignore sound advice. I don't want to spend a ton of money upgrading this 1500 because in the event of an accident the sticker will determine whether the law and insurance company will find me as overloaded. I believe you are making a wise decision. Much smarter to match the TV, and TT. Once you get it all setup, and running. I hope y'all will be able to enjoy years of camping fun. It really is all about the fun.
Terryallan 01/08/18 07:44am Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

. But other folks may in fact find it far more affordable to simply spend $500 to $1000 improving and modifying what they already have. To those who think that intelligent mods to a given truck does not increase it's capabilities, well ok. Some folks just can't be convinced. Of course you can improve it. but $1000.00 ain't gonna raise the payload of the truck. Towing capacity can easily be raised with lower rear gears. But even that is over $1000, and your payload will still be the same. Heavier tires will make you feel better, and also be near 1K, but your payload won't change. Air bags or springs will make the suspension stiffer, but your payload will be the same. Gonna be much, much more to raise the payload. So much more that another truck would be less expensive. So called 1/2 ton trucks (is there really such a thing anymore?) make GREAT tow vehicles. IF you stay within their limits. I like 5ers. and I could do enough mods to make my 150 hold the pin weight. Would it change the GVWR to handle the extra payload.? No. At some point you are just throwing money at a problem with no real gain. You still don't know what "payload" is. I suspect you think there is some sort of manufacturer magic involved. Fortunately for the OP there is an entire industry devoted to beefing up vehicles for towing. Actually? I do. Again, the question is. Do you. Pay load is the weight a truck can carry AFTER you subtract it's weight from the GVWR. And there is nothing you can do aside from rebuilding the vehicle, To change that. And if you are going to spend thousands rebuilding, replacing and beefing up the vehicle. Cheaper to get the correct vehicle in the first place, or get a trailer inside the limits of the one you have. And do remember. Payload has nothing to do with towing. Payload is only about what the truck can safely haul, and stop. As for that magic the manufacturers do. They do seem to spend a lot money on engineers, and science to come up with the ratings. I see it every day. I much more trust them than some guy that advocates hauling above the trucks rating. And that's ok. Go ahead and tow, haul over the limit. It's your right to be wrong. Just don't endanger others with your uneducated opinion. we are done. See Ya! wouldn't want to be Ya!
Terryallan 01/07/18 01:21pm Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

. But other folks may in fact find it far more affordable to simply spend $500 to $1000 improving and modifying what they already have. To those who think that intelligent mods to a given truck does not increase it's capabilities, well ok. Some folks just can't be convinced. Of course you can improve it. but $1000.00 ain't gonna raise the payload of the truck. Towing capacity can easily be raised with lower rear gears. But even that is over $1000, and your payload will still be the same. Heavier tires will make you feel better, and also be near 1K, but your payload won't change. Air bags or springs will make the suspension stiffer, but your payload will be the same. Gonna be much, much more to raise the payload. So much more that another truck would be less expensive. So called 1/2 ton trucks (is there really such a thing anymore?) make GREAT tow vehicles. IF you stay within their limits. I like 5ers. and I could do enough mods to make my 150 hold the pin weight. Would it change the GVWR to handle the extra payload.? No. At some point you are just throwing money at a problem with no real gain.
Terryallan 01/07/18 12:08pm Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

Point is that the payload police on this forum are simply ignorant of what the average person can do to improve the load-handling capability of their current rig - and for much less than the forum-recommended 1 ton dually. A typical ridiculous statement :S - the OP has a 1/2 ton truck which really isn't suitable for the particular trailer he has so his best solution is to simply upgrade to a 3/4 ton OR downsize the trailer to one his current 1/2 ton can safely tow. A 1 ton dually isn't part of the conversation. :R Yea, no. You are a few fries short of a happy meal on this one. The OP has options beyond swapping vehicles or trailers. Yes the OP has many options. but safely towing that trailer with that truck ain't one of them. and for you to advocate him towing over loaded is just pure BAD advise at best, and dangerous at worst. For you cannot raise the GVWR of the truck with out completely rebuilding it. Your helper springs, or air bags didn't do anything to help control that 500lb you talk about. The rest of the truck including the brakes which you have now overloaded, is still rated to only handle the factory rated GVWR, and GCVWR. You also need to know. the trailer brakes don't have anything to do with stopping the truck. But take heart. Come on down, and we will teach you to pump gas.
Terryallan 01/07/18 06:49am Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

I question whether you understand what goes into payload capability. Do you think the frame is thicker? Do you think the sheet metal is stronger? Just what sort of magic do you think goes into the payload rating? They read it on the internet somewhere. Or someone told them. Therefore it's some sort of magical tell-all number. How do they explain that a typical 2500 has the same components under the rear as it's sister 3500, yet the 2500 is somehow magically limited to 10000 pounds GVWR. Could registration regulations have anything to do with it ? In my state, the highway patrol could care less what the payload or GVWR number is on that sticker. What they care about is whether the actual weight on the axle is within legal limits, and also, whether I am registered ( plates ) for the correct weight class. For instance on my little puny class one Frontier, I run a 12K plate, even though the truck, since it is class one, is "limited" to 6K. I have to run a heavier plate, because the truck regis also covers any trailer I tow. Dana/spicer builds the rear axle assembly for Nissan. The axle is rated by them higher than what Nissan states as rear axle limit. Imagine that. EDIT: how is it that GCWR is higher/lower depending on the differential gear ratio ? Hmmmm....enquiring minds want to know. I would only ask if you really know.? First the GCVWR is higher with a lower gear because. I'm thinkin it is because a lower gear can move more weight than a higher gear. Pretty sure of that. Being science and all. Plus it is highly likely that the lower gear higher rated gear has had one or two more processes done to it. Do remember. higher gears get better MPG, and lower gears pull more weight. Towing 101. As for increasing the GVWR of a vehicle. again there are many, many things to take into consideration. Simply adding heavier tires, and stiffer springs as suggested just won't do it. After all when you changed tires, Did you upgrade the rims? Did you upgrade the hubs? How about the brakes, up grade them as well? How about the gearsets, up grade them as well? Not all the same you know. And not all vehicles even with the same ratio get the same rear gears. After all two trucks sitting on the lot beside each other, even though they look just alike, have the same motor, Trany, and rear ratio can have different GVWRs by as much as 1000lbs. WHY? Because they do not have the same components all the way thru. and there is nothing you can do to raise the lower rated truck to the same GVWR of the higher rated truck. UNLESS, you want to totally rebuild the lower rated truck, right down to the Ring, and pinions in the rear end. Why would you want to do that? How are ring, and pinions different you ask? Ford GM, Fiat / Ram , and on, and on, use the same ratio in different rated vehicles, but the ring, and pinion can be vastly different. Different processes make them stronger, less brittle. Higher rated vehicles get shot peened gearsets, some get Shot peened, hard drilled, and tapped and Phosphated. Lower rated vehicles get non shot peened, and no Phos gearsets. So when you begin to try to change the GWVR of a vehicle. Be ready to go all the way, Or all you did in truth, was to lower the payload by adding weight. Hope this helps your understanding of how vehicles can be rated differently.
Terryallan 01/05/18 07:31pm Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

if you're consistently 500+ lbs over payload on a 1/2 ton truck you can certainly expect to start seeing drive train issues. What issues? Be specific please. (Crickets chirping ) Reality is that a person can increase the payload capability with tires, shocks, springs and/air bags. The real reality is that. NONE of that will increase the payload. In truth. there is nothing you can do to increase the factory payload of a vehicle.
Terryallan 01/04/18 07:48pm Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

To the OP, welcome to having the RV net weight police descend upon your parade like a ton of bricks ( pardon the pun ). Before you panic and run out and trade the 1500 on a new one ton dually, take your truck to the scales and get some real world weights. Compare them to the door sticker, paying particular attention to rear axle actual weight, vs capacity. If you already have this new trailer, or can get it to the scale, get the actual weights. Real numbers trump internet forum opinions spouted by guys that just want to spend your money on a new truck. When you get some real data, come back here and let's discuss this further. There is a possibility you could in fact hook this all up and be within the axle ( and tire ) ratings, and have a good combo. I spend seven months a year on the road in a lot of different campgrounds. Talk to a lot of people. Let's just say what I see out here in the real world is often quite different from what I see being yakked about on the forum. A lot of innernut keyboard experts out there.... Yeah. Some of us only been doing this for 40 years or so. We don't know nothin. But I can tell you this. The brakes on a vehicle, any vehicle are only rated to STOP the GVWR of itself. Overload the vehicle, and you over load the brakes. You compromise your stopping ability, and your safety. There is a lot more to towing safely than the weight capacity of the rear axle. Telling some one it is safe to well overload their TV is not a good idea. And the OP has almost ran out of payload when he hooks to that empty trailer. 1500 series trucks, make great TVs. but you got to stay inside their capacities. BTW. there is another guy that wants to tow a travel trailer with a minivan. You should tell him that is OK as well. Totally agree but there is always someone who takes self worth in insulting and disparaging forum members opinions. Unable to communicate without insults, vague or otherwise and boosting their self worth this way, they do so from the safety of of hiding behind a computer screen. One small detail that you stated though that is often written here, A trucks brakes are (Per Ford and Ram at least) designed to stop the full combination weight it is rated for. That is not to say one doesn't need brakes on a trailer. That only means that the truck brakes are designed to provide sufficient braking when called upon in the event the trailers brakes are not up to the task. Only Reason I mentioned about the brakes. Is because I was taught by a guy (Brakeman) that designs brakes for a major car company. He told me the brakes are only designed to safely stop the GVWR of the vehicle, and not the trailer. They will. but could take awhile. But he could have been wrong, or I may have misunderstood him. I been wrong twice that I know of:B
Terryallan 01/02/18 08:20pm Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

To the OP, welcome to having the RV net weight police descend upon your parade like a ton of bricks ( pardon the pun ). Before you panic and run out and trade the 1500 on a new one ton dually, take your truck to the scales and get some real world weights. Compare them to the door sticker, paying particular attention to rear axle actual weight, vs capacity. If you already have this new trailer, or can get it to the scale, get the actual weights. Real numbers trump internet forum opinions spouted by guys that just want to spend your money on a new truck. When you get some real data, come back here and let's discuss this further. There is a possibility you could in fact hook this all up and be within the axle ( and tire ) ratings, and have a good combo. I spend seven months a year on the road in a lot of different campgrounds. Talk to a lot of people. Let's just say what I see out here in the real world is often quite different from what I see being yakked about on the forum. A lot of innernut keyboard experts out there.... Yeah. Some of us only been doing this for 40 years or so. We don't know nothin. But I can tell you this. The brakes on a vehicle, any vehicle are only rated to STOP the GVWR of itself. Overload the vehicle, and you over load the brakes. You compromise your stopping ability, and your safety. There is a lot more to towing safely than the weight capacity of the rear axle. Telling some one it is safe to well overload their TV is not a good idea. And the OP has almost ran out of payload when he hooks to that empty trailer. 1500 series trucks, make great TVs. but you got to stay inside their capacities. BTW. there is another guy that wants to tow a travel trailer with a minivan. You should tell him that is OK as well.
Terryallan 01/02/18 07:20pm Travel Trailers
RE: Question on Towing and Weight Distribution for a Newbie

Very simply put. You need more truck. Or you need a much lighter TT. Your choice. But you ain't got enough truck for that trailer. and remember. the weight of the passengers, and cargo in the truck reduces the towing capacity. I also don't believe you are taking the pay load into account. 7000lb GVWR is going to leave you with a payload in the 1400lb range. A TT that starts with a 900lb tongue weight will have a 1200lb tongue weight very quickly. Guess what. your payload is gone. you don't have any left for the family, and hitch. In short. IF you take 2 vehicles, don't load anything into the truck, except YOU. and load very little into the TT. You might have a small chance of staying in your Truck's capacities. A very small chance You need more truck, and NO 3.42 is NOT a towing gear. Much too high. And while you are at it. You better check the hitch capacity. 1200lb, Even 1000lbs may be heavier that a 1500lb stock hitch can carry
Terryallan 01/02/18 03:58pm Travel Trailers
RE: Chrysler Town and Country Towing

Rather than listen to the uninformed, go to www.canamrv.ca in Canada and read Andy Thompson's info. He's been setting up mini vans for towing for many years IF you have PLENTY of money, and don't mind heavily modifying your van.
Terryallan 01/01/18 08:42pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Chrysler Town and Country Towing

I have a 2014 Chrysler Town and Country van. I am interested in any information from anyone towing anything besides a pop up. I've read a lot of negative information on towing a standard trailer, not so much for the weight limit but because of the height of a standard trailer. The V6 engine paired with the 6 speed transmission, seems to have more than adequate power. If there is anyone out there that is towing anything other than a pop up, with this combination I would love to hear from you on your success or not so successful. Thanks! Van power feel with out a barn wall behind it, Is a far different feel than it will be with a wall behind it. Then there is that problem of the van actually holding up the trailer tongue. There is better than good chance that the van is not able to use a WDH to help hold up the TT. In short. Trying to tow a TT with a front wheel drive minivan is not a real good idea.
Terryallan 01/01/18 12:33pm Tow Vehicles
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