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 > Your search for posts made by 'aftermath' found 51 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Towing "movement" - How much is normal?

Has anyone mentioned the trailer tires? Air them up to the max on the sidewalls as well. Running them under inflated for the load is a disaster just waiting.
aftermath 01/26/16 09:25am Travel Trailers
RE: New vs used TT

So, you are looking at two units, one new and the other one used. Since they both cost the same I would go with the one you like the best, end of story. Buying used is a good idea as long as the trailer has been taken care of. Any savings buying used can quickly disappear once you have to start fixing things. I bought my trailer used and saved a ton, but I didn't have many choices. I felt that the previous owner did not abuse the trailer but I found out later that he did neglect it. Some of my saved money went out the window but I am still ahead. Buying used can save you money up front but it is a bit of a gamble. If you save a lot of money then this is the way to go. If you are saving just a little, then look at the new one. Not much help huh?
aftermath 01/26/16 09:20am Travel Trailers
RE: TT for retirement use

I will second the Arctic Fox comment. I do not have one buy by cousin does and it is a very well built trailer and as solid as I have seen. It also is heavy which is probably why it feels that way. With your TV this won't be an issue. "Boondocking" means a lot of things to a lot of different people. If you are going to be living in it for 8 months at a time I would say get a big one, the bigger the better actually. If you plan to park in a place where you don't have hookups then I wouldn't get all worked up about clearance. My cousin's Arctic Fox has a lot of clearance, more than I like actually as I think there are 3 or 4 steps to get into the cabin. If you are going to drag this up mountain logging roads and out through the trees then clearance will be a big issue. I would never buy a trailer and then flip the axles unless that was all I could afford. Northwoods Manufacturing make a number of trailers that have cold weather advantages. Look for thermal windows and a covered insulated belly pan and ducted air. My cousin's Arctic Fox has a great AC system that keeps it cool and is very quiet.
aftermath 01/26/16 09:10am Travel Trailers
RE: as you have advised...

Not having the actual numbers in front of me I would say your take is correct. When planning for hitches and tires and TV capacities it is best to always figure the GVWR of the trailer, not the unloaded or partially loaded numbers. As I recall, this is what happened to me. The weight bearing tires were over when compared to the dry weight but not enough for the gross weight. All that said, some of the weight is placed on the ball of the TV so it isn't as clear as you might think. If you have the trailer, take it in and have it weighed. You will then know how much weight is sitting on the axles. When you get new tires make sure you have a buffer above the actual weight of your loaded trailer.
aftermath 01/26/16 08:58am Travel Trailers
RE: as you have advised...

I purchased a new Starcraft hybrid a few years back. It was a 21ft with a slideout. It came with load range C tires, Carlisle as I recall. I don't know the weight of your trailer but the problem with LRC tires is that they don't carry much weight. I had a blowout soon after I got the trailer. I watched the pressures and was not overloaded. It was cool outside and I had not hit anything in the road. The problem was that the tire was spec'd right at the dry weight of the trailer. I was overloaded as far as the tire was concerned. I was not overloaded as far as the trailer weights said. Point here is, I don't think the brand is as important as the load carrying capacity of the tire. I would trade them in and go up a category. Check the numbers on the tire against the max weight of your trailer and then give yourself some extra room. I have Maxxis on my current trailer and have been happy with them. Lots of miles in the last 4 years.
aftermath 01/25/16 07:54pm Travel Trailers
RE: Towing "movement" - How much is normal?

I agree with what CoolMom said. That and this..... On top of all the above, one more thing to consider, truck tires. Air them to max pressure when towing. If you have the stock P rated tires (= soft and squishy sidewalls) consider upgrading to LT tires. I towed a 21 ft hybrid with an Equalizer hitch and it was a very nice towing setup. I then bought an Airstream that was 5 feet longer and a full ton heavier. I also upgraded the hitch to a 10K/1K bar system. Got it set up nice and level but with the extra tongue wt I started to notice a little "squirm" at times. My Tundra came with P radials and even though I had them aired up, they were not as solid as I expected. Changed over to LRD truck tires and it really did make a difference. Lastly, watch your mirrors and it the trailer is moving left and right then you need to dial in the hitch.
aftermath 01/24/16 10:37pm Travel Trailers
RE: For those who have a small vehicle and love camping

Mark and Linda, There are many options out there for you. I suggest you concentrate on what you mean when you said, "we love to camp". Is your idea of camping crawling into the back of a closed up trailer and sleeping after you have removed all of the stuff you had in place? Are you staying put for any length of time? What does camping mean to you? Once you get this down, you will know what would work best for you. I am an old guy who started in a tent, then went to a tent trailer which was GREAT and we had it for 17 years. I pulled it with a 4 cylinder Mazda pickup and we went everywhere with it. A tent trailer of some sort would be my first choice but then, I am not you. Good luck with the search.
aftermath 01/24/16 09:13am Travel Trailers
RE: Silverado 1500... Enough?

I agree with what most have said except for the "go out and get a 3/4 ton" position. Your truck with pull the trailer just fine. The fact that it is a half ton will limit you to what you can take along. My numbers are quite similar to yours. I am going down the road at about 6400 and when the WD bars are in place my tongue weight is around 850. We travel relatively light when considering what I put in the truck so, even though we are close to the payload limit, we are comfortable. When you hear people tell you that you really need to get a bigger truck, or get a big truck with a diesel, they are coming at things from their prospective. Full timers have a need to bring more stuff than a weekender so it makes perfect sense for them to go big. Some have a few kids and a dog with all the extra stuff that that would entail. No so in our case. We have been out for a month at a time a few times. We put the gear and the food in the trailer and the bikes on the back. We sit in the seats and have a generator in the back along with a rug and some extra leveling blocks in the bed. Sometimes we also bring along some firewood, but not much. If you have towed your trailer with your previous truck, you will be fine with the new one. You know what you are getting into.
aftermath 01/24/16 08:59am Travel Trailers
RE: Dumping grey water

I believe that your take on this thread is an East vs. West kind of thing. Most (not all) campgrounds specifically prohibit dumping of gray water so common sense and respect would say not to do it. There are some places that don't speak to it and I have been in a few where the people in charge are glad to get some water to surrounding plants and bushes. "Dumping" as in simply emptying your tank right at the site is never a good idea. Running a hose out to the edge and into some bushes will do little harm and a lot more good in the end. If your gray water "smells" then you have a problem with your tank. We treat our black tanks but few treat the gray tank. If you are worried about the smell then take care of the tank. I use biodegradable safe chemicals in the gray tank. I walk through campgrounds all the time and see tent trailers with a bucket outside catching all the dish water. I also watch these campers take the bucket to the nearest bush and empty it. Tenters do the same and have been doing it for decades.
aftermath 01/17/16 09:33am Travel Trailers
RE: WD hitch question

Riley, don't get a hitch without built in sway control. If the dealer is willing to "throw in" such a hitch you might be able to negotiate a lower price on a better hitch. I too have an Equalizer and really like it. I have towed under all kinds of conditions and have never had an issue with sway. I think getting a good hitch is rather important. I would also suggest a Prodigy brake controller. Best wishes. You have lots of fun ahead. Congratulations on the trailer.
aftermath 01/16/16 09:04am Travel Trailers
RE: Newbie...So I Need Help with WDH

Borninblue, Just read this thread today and I have a headache. Too much verbiage for such a simple concept. I am towing a slightly lighter trailer with my Tundra and use the 10,000/1,000 Equalizer and it works great. Your 3/4 ton will not have any trouble with this setup. If your carrying capacity is around 2600 you will be fine. Think of it this way. When you are getting ready to go think of how much you will put in or on the truck. 1000 pounds of tongue weight brings you down to 1600 pounds. You, the wife and kids will most likely leave you with 1100 pounds. Wow, you still have a lot that you can load in the back. My Tundra leaves me only 1600. Once the trailer is on the ball and the wife and I are in our seats we have a scant couple of hundred left. We make it just fine and you will too.
aftermath 01/11/16 01:54pm Towing
RE: Sway with new truck

I am with Barney, if it towed fine before it isn't a tongue weight issue. A new truck, even if it is the same brand, will be different than your old truck. Make sure your hitch is adjusted properly. Simply moving the head up (or down) might be a good way to have the trailer ride level but that alone does not help your weight distribution issue. Read the directions on the hitch, or call the manufacturer, and follow them for setup. Go to the scales and weight the setup to make sure that you are returning enough weight to the front axle. Light front ends combined with P radial tires that are under inflated is a recipe for sway. Are you experiencing sway or just a squirmy feeling? My original P radials on my Tundra required that I air them up to the max and that really helped.
aftermath 01/11/16 01:39pm Towing
RE: Ultra light trailers

Whatever trailer you get, make sure that your vehicle can safely stop the trailer without overheating the brakes, especially in hilly country. A van will have no trouble pulling a trailer. But the braking is a different issue. A good quality trailer has good quality brakes that when set up properly will stop the trailer. Your TV does not have to stop everything. If you are depending on the TV's brakes doing all the work then you really need to have someone look at your trailer.
aftermath 01/11/16 01:19pm Travel Trailers
RE: how do I properly weigh my rig?

I like Ron's method. It takes three trips over the scales, one with just the truck, one with the trailer connected but without the WD hitch connected and a third with the WD working. When setting up a WD hitch it is nice to know how much weight is being transferred to the front axle of the TV. First weighing gives you the front axle of the truck. With trailer attached you will find out how much weight has been removed. Now connect the WD hitch and you will find out how much has been returned to the front axle. Adjust your hitch accordingly. Just my two cents.
aftermath 01/11/16 01:11pm Travel Trailers
RE: how do I properly weigh my rig?

The info in gmw photo's post is the best, cheapest, fastest way that provides most of the pertinent information. If you want individual wheel weights you'll have to find a scale that will allow it. Some states turn their weight read out screens so you can read them thru the window when the weight station is closed. Washington is one of them. All you have to do is find a closed weight station on a secondary road and you can weigh as much as you want for no charge. This is it. I have also heard that some weigh stations will do this for you when they are not busy. gmw provided a template that I followed and it was pretty easy to figure out all the weights you mentioned.
aftermath 01/10/16 04:57pm Travel Trailers
RE: Hitch recommendation

I don't own one but have read on this and the airstream forum and have talked to a couple of owners. They are heavy which is an issue for some of us older campers. They are not always easy to hitch and unhitch on uneven ground. Those who use them and have used them for a long time say that the hitching is something learned and you get better with practice. I really do believe this but going in it will be a challenge.
aftermath 01/09/16 04:35pm Travel Trailers
RE: NOOB question 2014 Tundra Towing 7500 pd Trailer

I tow with a Tundra but my 25' trailer goes down the road at about 6500 pounds. You are going to be pushing the numbers a bit. The issue with the Tundra, and most other half tons, is the payload. Your truck will have no problems pulling or stopping with correctly adjusted trailer brakes. Once you set the trailer on the tongue, get your wife and kids in the seats you might not be able to carry much of anything else by the numbers. The numbers are guidelines and you certainly don't want to ignore them completely but when you go over by a couple hundred pounds I doubt it will cause you to end up in the ditch. Get a GOOD WD hitch with built in sway control. Keep your speed down and load things into the trailer instead of into the bed when possible.
aftermath 01/09/16 11:25am Tow Vehicles
RE: Hitch recommendation

If you want a good hitch, there are plenty to choose from. It seems to me that Reese and Equalizer are at the top when it comes to companies that have been around a long time a have very dependable products. I use the Equalizer and have done so for about 15 years now. Way back, a long time ago, the Reese hitches needed to be disconnected when backing. That and the fact that I didn't like snapping the chains into place steered me toward the Equalizer. It is a very easy hitch to hook up and has worked very well for me. Today, the Reese hitches are much better and are easy to use as well. It would be a coin flip for me today. I am towing with a half ton and pull a trailer similar in weight to the one your brother is looking at. The Equalizer works for me. I did not mention the HA or PP hitches as I was trying to respect your opening statement about cost. These hitches are in a world apart from the rest, better in many regards but they do have down sides as well.
aftermath 01/09/16 11:10am Travel Trailers
RE: sway, or no??

Just read this post. I always enjoy hearing from all the experts on the sway control topic. You have a good hitch right now. Get it set up properly and weigh your setup to be sure. If you are really paranoid about things by all means step up and get a HA or a PP, they are they best according to many. Now, the part that really kills me is the idea that a big heavy truck like a 1 ton "can handle" the trailer without a problem. Granted a 350 might not need any WD but all trucks need Sway Control. Sway has nothing to do with the truck, it has everything to do with the trailer. Once a trailer starts to sway it can get ugly in a hurry. If you are towing with a light truck this sway will be transferred to the truck sooner than if you were in a tank but as far as the trailer is concerned, you are still swaying. So, if you want to PREVENT sway, get a WD hitch with built in sway control regardless of the size of your TV. And, as has been mentioned earlier, if you are happy towing without sway control because you have a big truck and don't need either WD or SC then good luck. I am very happy with my setup but still like the SC because of all the unforeseen possibilities out there. An sudden emergency move, a blow out, a big gust of wind and on and on. There are many very good hitches out there and you have a good one already. Happy towing.
aftermath 12/29/15 09:06am Towing
RE: Question about sewer hose supports

The supports are nice of occasional use, and we have found that a length of plastic gutter is even better. I had a 10' section, and cut it at 6', and carry both sections nested together. As we find many sewer connections are above ground level, these along with the supports work very well. By sliding the sections together, we can use whatever length we need from 4' to 10'. A package of long tie-wraps is a good addition. This is exactly what I do! Went to a second hand building supply and picked up the plastic gutter for a couple of bucks. I carry some extra 2 by 8 by 12" planks and use them. Works for me and I have almost never had to use more than the 10 ft.
aftermath 12/28/15 05:16pm Travel Trailers
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