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 > Your search for posts made by 'msmith1199' found 592 matches.

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RE: Cost of driving now vs then

We just bought a new car. It's actually the first brand new car we have ever purchased. Anyway it has me thinking about how much cars cost now vs decades ago. I remember in 1973 my father purchased a new basic Dodge Dart for $2700. Back then minimum wage was $1.75 so it would have taken 1543 hours to pay for that car. Now a Dodge Dart can be purchased for $16320....1338 hours of labor at our current minimum wage of $12.20 per hour. Flaw: Though there are some cities and possibly states which have a higher Minimum wage.. The Federal minimum is 2.75,, YES 2.75 The official federal minimum is 7.25 but if you are a waitress or waiter or work in another job class where you get tips it's 2.75. So please re-calc based on 7.25, not 12.20 as the minimum wage. Bernie was not successful in raising the minimum wage or elminating the wate-staff execption to it. I know one watress. I saw her pay stub 28 dollars for the week. The OP is in Canada. Last time I checked, they didn't follow our laws up there.
msmith1199 01/12/17 12:28pm Around the Campfire
RE: Cost of driving now vs then

I can tell you this, I bought my current truck new 10 years ago. A 2007 F150. Despite earning almost 4x now than I did 10 years ago when I bought it, I can't afford to replace that truck with an identical new model as it costs exponentially more than it did then. The rate of increase in the cost of that truck has exceeded the rate of my income growth. Pickup prices do seem to have gone insane if you want new with all (or even some) of the bells and Whistles. A basic work truck is still semi-affordable, but a Ford F-150 4x4 on the low end comes in around $40k. People are paying over $60k for a 3/4 ton truck nicely outfitted. I just can't bring myself to pay that kind of money for any vehicle, other than my motorhome.
msmith1199 01/12/17 12:27pm Around the Campfire
RE: Exercising your RV while at campsite

My motorhome is a 2004 with a Cat diesel and currently has about 50,000 miles on it. I have had it since new. In 13 years I have never had to repair a single thing related to the drive train. Nothing has ever broke. I do live in California so I can easily take my motorhome for a drive anytime I want so if you live in a place you have to winterize it then you have to deal with that. Whether I'm doing it right or wrong all I can tell you is 13 years with zero mechanical repair bills tells me I must be doing something right. I guess we all have our success stories based on diverse experiences - Bought our new 2003 5th wheel with Onan 5500 generator and we transferred it into 2 other 5th wheels over 13 years until we sold it last May in our last 5er. Sat 9 months every single winter for 13 years - never touched it. Temperatures down to -20. Changed oil 3 times in 13 years. Every spring it started and never missed a beat. It's still running today with the new owner. If it were up to Onan, I would be out there with a portable heater under it trying to start it every month to spin the armature. You're comparing a generator to a motorhome????
msmith1199 01/07/17 09:08am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Arizona State Taxes if Annually Rent RV Space??

My father in law retired from the military while stationed in california and immediately moved to colorado. California came after him for taxes for years. He finally prevailed but he was harassed and threatened for those years. No good reason, that was just California. That was called "The source tax." California, as well as other states with a state income tax, decided that any pension you received that was based on work you did while in California that you owed California State income tax on it, regardless of where you lived after retirement. That was outlaws by Federal law years ago. Only the state you claim residency in or earn income in, can collect income taxes on you, assuming you follow the time limit rules. You can't claim to be a Nevada resident and spend 2 days in Nevada and 363 days in California. Or at least you can't get caught doing that.
msmith1199 01/06/17 03:04pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Arizona State Taxes if Annually Rent RV Space??

My last 8 years work were in California, left as soon as I retired. Liked to visit each summer, but quit because CA kept insisting that I was a resident and wanted state income taxes. Is Arizona like that? this doesn't make a lot of sense to me. you moved out of CA, established residency elsewhere, and when you visited CA and did not earn any money in CA they wanted income taxes from you. how did they even know you were in CA visiting or is there something you aren't telling us? bumpy The revenuers know everything!!
msmith1199 01/06/17 01:20pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Exercising your RV while at campsite

Hello. Numerous people on this site say that a RV (class A Diesel) should not sit for a long period of time. How long is long? What if you are at a park and not planning to go out of the park in the immediate future. Is running the RV in the park enough exercise and if yes for how long? If no how long does one need to drive it out of the park to give it the required exercise? Thank you in advance. I'm no expert like all the others on here, but I'll tell you I once bought a Chev pickup many years ago. I think it was about 8 years old at the time I bought it and it had less than 20,000 miles on it. The guy I bought it from told me he only used it in the summer to pull his trailer and 7 to 8 months out of the year it would sit in his driveway complete unused. He would take the battery out and not put it back in until camping season. I thought I was getting a good deal on such a low mileage vehicle. And it ran great for about two months, then the problems started. I can't even remember most of them but I remember the big items. Like a new transmission, a valve job, new rear brake drums, and a list of other things. And every single problem was related to letting it sit too long without running it according to the mechanics. Now it was a gas engine versus a diesel and it wasn't a motorhome, but it taught me a lesson. I rarely go longer than a month without taking the motorhome out for a drive. I don't drive 100 miles or for several hours, but I do take it out to the freeway and down to the next ramp and then back around. Probably a 10 mile circle and I let the engine run for at least 30 minutes. The reason I drive it is more than just to put a load on the engine. It's to make sure everything else spins and distributes the lube too. The drive axels, tranny, wheel bearings, etc. My motorhome is a 2004 with a Cat diesel and currently has about 50,000 miles on it. I have had it since new. In 13 years I have never had to repair a single thing related to the drive train. Nothing has ever broke. I do live in California so I can easily take my motorhome for a drive anytime I want so if you live in a place you have to winterize it then you have to deal with that. Whether I'm doing it right or wrong all I can tell you is 13 years with zero mechanical repair bills tells me I must be doing something right.
msmith1199 01/06/17 01:18pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Exercising your RV while at campsite

There's some advice that's all over the board!! While this ^^^^ is not helpful ^^^^^, the reality is that you should NOT "exercise" (start) your engine while parked. You need to drive the RV 25+ miles if you plan to start it. If that's not in the plan then there is no reason to start the engine. It's likely also not necessary to run the genset while parked but if you do then you should load it up to about a 50 percent load and let it run for an hour or so. Unload it, let it cool down for a few minutes and then shut the generator down with no load. Mine is not helpful but getting advice that is everything from let it sit for 5 years and don't worry about it, to start it every 30 days and drive it 100 miles, is helpful?
msmith1199 01/06/17 11:42am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Exercising your RV while at campsite

There's some advice that's all over the board!!
msmith1199 01/05/17 05:08pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Supplemental Brakes Confession Time

Don't look for TRAILERS. Look for, or do what I did, ask the State Police, what the requirement is for a "VEHICLE IN TOW". Then try to remember when you saw any tow truck operator put a supplemental braking system in a car that they were towing. TRAILER requirements are what the people put in the ads to fool people in to buying their braking system. It works, so they keep doing it. msimth1199 is ex-police and he is telling you the truth. As I mentioned, I contacted most States that I would travel in and never found a single one that required brakes in my toad. I posted the names of the people that I contacted. Here is a typical reply from Florida. NOTE that no weight limit is ever mentioned. Compare this with what BrakeBuddy tries to tell you: A vehicle towed behind a motor home would be exempt from the braking requirements in Florida statute 316.261 as a drive away, tow away operation. Please contact me if you have any other questions. Lt. Jeff Frost Florida Highway Patrol Public Affairs Officer Commercial Vehicle Enforcement 2900 Apalachee Parkway, MS 45 850-617-2279 Tallahassee, Florida 32399 www.flhsmv.gov/fhp Jefffrost@flhsmv.gov Which is why I went to my state police and inquired. Was told that "the book" says if the vehicle was never DESIGNED to be towed ( and cars ARENT) then no Aux braked are needed. A TRAILER which IS designed to be towed...DOES require braked. And again, as far as I know there is no state that has a law that says aux brakes are never needed. All the states have a braking performance requirement and if your motorhome and toad can't meet that requirement then yes aux brakes are mandated as it's the only way you'll be able to comply with the law. If your motorhome is a 21 foot Class C and your toad is a Ford F-250 4x4 crew cab long bed truck, then I assure you every state in the land will have a law requiring you to have aux brakes on your toad because you'll never be able to stop that combination with just the brakes on the motorhome.
msmith1199 01/04/17 10:38pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Supplemental Brakes Confession Time

Not sure I have a dog in this fight since I have had a supplemental tow system installed and in use for the past 13 years. I towed for 3 years without one and was grateful when I finally got around to installing it. Crossing the b order into British Columbia they require a brake system for any towed vehicle in excess of 1500 kg (3300 lbs). Not everyone is headed into BC, but. . . Correct. My understanding is that applies to all of Canada.
msmith1199 12/31/16 02:45pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Supplemental Brakes Confession Time

Don't look for TRAILERS. Look for, or do what I did, ask the State Police, what the requirement is for a "VEHICLE IN TOW". Then try to remember when you saw any tow truck operator put a supplemental braking system in a car that they were towing. TRAILER requirements are what the people put in the ads to fool people in to buying their braking system. It works, so they keep doing it. msimth1199 is ex-police and he is telling you the truth. As I mentioned, I contacted most States that I would travel in and never found a single one that required brakes in my toad. I posted the names of the people that I contacted. Here is a typical reply from Florida. NOTE that no weight limit is ever mentioned. Compare this with what BrakeBuddy tries to tell you: A vehicle towed behind a motor home would be exempt from the braking requirements in Florida statute 316.261 as a drive away, tow away operation. Please contact me if you have any other questions. Lt. Jeff Frost Florida Highway Patrol Public Affairs Officer Commercial Vehicle Enforcement 2900 Apalachee Parkway, MS 45 850-617-2279 Tallahassee, Florida 32399 www.flhsmv.gov/fhp Jefffrost@flhsmv.gov RG, I'm not looking for 'trailers'. It is what came up when I punched in 'towing'. It is hard to navigate TDOT. I want to see it in writing what TN says about towing a car behind a motorhome and the requirements. I'll find it. I haven't given up. MM. The vast majority of States do not have any laws that specifically address towing a motor vehicle behind another motor vehicle. There are a couple that do. Over the years on here I have gone to the actual vehicle codes of most States and checked whenever somebody has posted that it is required by law. I did not keep track, but I did find a couple that it was. North Carolina is one of those. Somebody posted the statute on here and you can see that it covers the towing of a "vehicle" by another vehicle. But it also only mandates it if the vehicle being towed is over 4,000 pounds. So many toads do come in under that, like a Jeep Wrangler. Most state laws about trailer brakes specifically say "Trailer." And someplace all those vehicle codes will define a trailer. And none of those definitions will fit the definition of a motor vehicle. So none of those laws that require "trailer" brakes apply to a towed motor vehicle. They would have to specifically include motor vehicle or vehicle to apply, just like the law in North Carolina does. I think Virginia's law also included motor vehicles and there may have been on other I found. What all the rest of the states have is a braking performance requirement. Those laws will state that a vehicle, or combination of vehicles, must be able to stop within a certain distance from a certain speed. I have a heavy DP and my current toad is a 2017 Jeep Wrangler. I'm not using aux brakes and probably won't. I feel perfectly safe driving it and although I have not gone out and slammed on the brakes in a measured course, I'm confident I can meet the braking requirements in the charts. So before all the hate starts I have to add the disclaimer here, I'm just telling you what the law is. Brakebuddy and all those others know good and well they are lying on their websites but they do it anyway. I would recommend that if you have a heavy toad or a light motorhome or a combination of the two, that you get aux brakes on your toad. But if you have a heavy DP and a light toad, do what you feel comfortable with.
msmith1199 12/31/16 12:35pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Supplemental Brakes Confession Time

Don't buy the the opinions that it is required by law. Buying small tractor in Nebraska, I was offered new 7000 lb equipment trailer with no brakes. I was driving 4000 lb SUV and would be perfectly legal. Toads are not trailers and are legal to tow with no brakes in all states last time I was checking, but there might be updates in last years. Still if you can find brake system that is really reliable and doesn't cost more than the toad, you can't go wrong with it. BTW since the incident above, whenever I drive in Nebraska I make sure I don't do sudden braking. Like most states, Nebraska has a braking performance requirement. I'm going out on a limb here, but I'll bet if you load that trailer to 7,000 pounds and put it behind your 4,000 pound SUV that you cannot meet the performance requirements required by Nebraska law.
msmith1199 12/30/16 04:20pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Supplemental Brakes Confession Time

Green Salsa, in NY and NC under 1,000 lbs. is the limit for no brake system. There is no state where it is legal to tow without a braking system if the tow is 1,000 lbs. or more. http://www.brakebuddy.com/towing-laws Brake Buddy is lying to you and they are doing it on purpose. In California, the State with the most laws in the land, it is NOT required to have brakes on a toad if you can meet the requirements in a braking performance chart. Never once have I seen CHP pull any motorhome over and require the driver get up to the appropriate speed and slam on the brakes.
msmith1199 12/30/16 04:14pm Dinghy Towing
RE: DH is concerned because our Coachmen Mirada has no bumpers

The best bumper is just don't hit anything. Seriously, if you need a bumper I think you'll have bigger issues then not having one.:R Not a very logical reply. Didn't it ever occur to you to think about negligent drivers and other vehicles hitting you. Low impact hits in parking lots come to mind, among others. Skip the snarky reply and think about it! :S Wow...bad day? :B That remark wasn't "snarky", it was logical - and a bit tongue in cheek too. :w If you're running around parking lots hitting things you shouldn't be driving. If someone else hits you the damage is on them, and you have bigger concerns than no bumpers. So one parking lot accident and your license is revoked for life?
msmith1199 12/30/16 04:09pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: DH is concerned because our Coachmen Mirada has no bumpers

It has bumpers - you just can't see them. The purpose of "bumpers" is to absorb low-MPH impacts and deflect the energy of a collision. Somewhere in the '80s, the auto industry decided the big, obvious chrome bumpers were unsightly and covered them with plastic. Underneath that fiberglass you will find bumpers that are designed to function just like their more obvious predecessors. They must have forgot to put those hidden bumpers on my motorhome because I have that thin fiberglass end cap, and then giant steel frame members. So "bumpers" to be seen.
msmith1199 12/29/16 11:43am Class A Motorhomes
RE: original price to what sells for used 10 years later?

Back in the day, Class A motorhomes were mainly designed for couples. Most floor plans had a bedroom with a king or queen size bed. Most had couches and dinettes that made into beds, but the design for was for couples. Class C's often came with bunks and the over cab beds and were more designed for families. More modern Class A makers do seem to be making "family" models with bunk beds and other features. My favorite is a design that has fold down bunk beds in a side room, and when you fold the beds up the entire room becomes a closet. Best of both worlds.
msmith1199 12/23/16 02:52pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: How hard to install an inverter to run my TV's?

I put a nice B&D 800 Watt inverter under the hood mounted on the firewall. Then put a separate outlet dedicated to the inverter in the cab area. Worked fine. Gave me 7 amps for stuff. Easy to find a place to mount, wire, and check on. Also added a off on switch with light next to the driver to operate a solenoid near the inverter. I'd bet there'd be a mounting situation near the back bunks. Maybe in a basement compartment. But...500 hours per year is only 10,000 hours over 20 years. There's nothing wrong with that. A well maintained genset should get at least 10K hours before overhaul. Usually 20K. 500 hours at .5 gallons an hour is 250 gallons of fuel a year and pretty much all he is powering is the TV's. 250 gallons is over $500 a year to watch TV? Seems to me like the inverter is a no brainer.
msmith1199 12/19/16 02:59pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Seattle to Orlando,and to the KEYS questions

Lots of people love to drive versus flying. I'm ex-Air Force aircrew and a current pilot, but given the choice I'd much rather drive across the Country than fly.
msmith1199 12/19/16 02:56pm Roads and Routes
RE: Seattle to Orlando,and to the KEYS questions

Just head South on 5 and then over. It's 500 miles further, but would have the best weather. But there are still some mountains through there. Carry chains or I personally like cables better than chains. Make sure you know how to put them on before leaving and make sure they fit. On your dates I assume you mean you are leaving to drive back on the 14th? Not that you have to be back in Seattle by the 14th? Do you have two drivers or just one? I can do 1000 miles a day with two drivers, but just me driving my limit is about 750 in one day. But I've never tried that many miles that many days in a row. Sounds like you know how far you have to go so if you would rather drive than fly that's a decision for you to make.
msmith1199 12/19/16 02:02pm Roads and Routes
RE: original price to what sells for used 10 years later?

I went to nada.com and arbitrarily picked a 2006 38' Bounder. Has a "suggested list price" new of $178k and a current "average retail" price of $70k. Obviously the "suggested list price" is considerably higher than the actual new sale price, but the 10 yr old current value is probably around half the original new sale price.I highly doubt you could actually get $70,000 for a 10 year old bounder, even if it was never used. Depreciation on a Motorhome is probably very similar to depreciation of an auto. 10 years old, you can maybe get 20 to 25 percent of the original purchase price on the sale of a normal auto (10 year old GMC Arcadia was around $36,000 new, no way it sells for more than $9,0000 if it has 100K miles, which is low usage of 10,000 miles per year). My guess is that Bounder probably sold new for around $130K and $25K to $30K would come pretty close to buying to today in a realistic sale . (normal miles no owner financing, not traded in retail to retail. Hasn't been completely gutted and redone with new electronics, flooring, fabrics etc.) 2006 Bounder DP It's one think to ask that much, it's another thing to get it. This does look like a very clean low mileage motorhome so he may get close.
msmith1199 12/18/16 09:45pm Class A Motorhomes
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