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 > Your search for posts made by 'rfryer' found 268 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Summertime Trips ----- Where?

These women are always trying to spoil your fun, aren’t they?:B I’m old, too, and I get the same thing when I want to make a hunting trip. I don’t like heat either in spite of the fact I live in Phoenix. I don’t even have ac on my TT because I don’t want to camp anywhere where it’s hot. If I go back east in the summer I may have to add it, though, but a better alternative would be to do that in the fall. So my summer trips are always to the mountains. 5000’ is about my minimum and I prefer over 7000’. That’s not hard to do in the mountains in AZ or NM, or further north. If I’m not going a long distance I’ll probably be in one or the other, or in SW CO and maybe Utah. I don’t do towns, but if I were to pick ones in the region I’d say Flagstaff and Showlow in AZ, Raton and Chama in NM, Durango/Silverton in CO, and Logan, UT.
rfryer 04/22/14 11:32am Roads and Routes
RE: Waxing Aluminum Sided TT??

My TT is 25 years old and I've always used car wax. Hasn't peeled yet.I found if I put three coats on scratches from brush along trail rubs right out. Same with my vehicles.
rfryer 04/20/14 11:27pm Travel Trailers
RE: Travelling the Southwest

Once you get into mid November you can get some pretty severe snowstorms in northern AZ and NM. You’ll minimize that if you stay below about 4000 in AZ. October’s great weather, high or low. The Phoenix area’s roughly 1100’ and you’ll be fine there in the winter. It can even get pretty cold if you’re away from the heat islands. I camp high and haven’t done much in southern NM, but I think the terrain there, in general, is a little higher so you may get more chance of snow. But someone from NM can give you better input. I’d do as someone suggested, do your high country traveling early and move south as it gets later in the year. And the weather isn’t predictable, so keep up with it. Have a nice trip.
rfryer 04/20/14 02:36pm Roads and Routes
RE: Brand New at this - Need Help w/ decision

I think size is mostly an issue of comfort and access and they tend to be mutually exclusive. So you need to know the types of places you want to camp. With a MH I’m guessing you don’t want to go off the beaten track to any serious extent, so questions of tight roads and national forest sites and similar shouldn’t be an issue. A small unit will go about anywhere and there are a lot of campsite options. As you increase the size you’ll find fewer sites you can fit in and some may be taken by smaller units. So advance reservations, I think, are very common. If you’re happy with commercial and well developed public campgrounds near the pavement you should be able to find a spot with little trouble. And the national parks will have some campgrounds big enough to handle a larger rig. Also, if the rig is very big, you will have to be careful and make sure you can maneuver parking lots and gas stations before you commit. If you like more remote and pristine camping, then you have to think small because maneuverability becomes king. It’s really no different than my 268# neighbor can’t get in the same places I can at 170#, at least not without a lot of trauma. And no one can decide for you, you have to weigh it yourself and find a compromise best suited for you. Good luck.
rfryer 04/19/14 04:02pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Need buying tip

I'd like to think I'm fairly capable of doing my own repairs. It's the electrical stuff that I wonder about. You know they always scare you with the line "a new fridge would cost you $$$". Realistically, does anyone really have any issues with their electrical systems? Electrical problems are fairly common, they’re also fairly simple and cheap to fix. As far as the frig goes, the one in my 1989 TT went out two years ago. So while any mechanical gadget can fail prematurely, it may also last for decades. It depends whether you want to pay for peace of mind or to play the odds, which are in your favor. Another thought. I recently ran across an extensive article on extended warranties. In short, it said you shouldn’t buy a warranty that costs more than half the most expensive repair you could incur or the item. FWIW.
rfryer 04/19/14 10:35am Beginning RVing
RE: Can a 5th wheel be too light for my truck?

I'm shopping for a 5th wheel and my wife and I want something on the small and light side so we can get into relatively remote places. Our truck is a 2001 Dodge diesel 3/4 ton 2wd longbed. Would a hitch weight below or around 1,000 pounds cause problems like a rough ride either in the truck or for the trailer? Any other reason to be concerned about this? My thought exactly when I got my F150. But I quickly realized it was too high to get back on the national forest trails I camped on. So I went with a small TT instead. Just a reminder in case you hadn’t considered that.
rfryer 04/18/14 02:59pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Complete Newbie Seeking Guidance

I think scbwr said it well. RV’s can be anything from a PU to a MH and they all have their pros and cons. And all are a bundle of compromises; you can’t have your cake and eat it too. I think you’re on the right track leaning toward tt’s per #1, but you need to do a lot of research and know how and where you want to camp, and look at a lot of units to decide what might work best for you. For example, if you want a lot of space and amenities and will camp in FHU cg’s think big. The impact is a big TV, advance reservations in cg’s, planning for gas station and parking lot access, and so on. And restrictions on how far you can get from the pavement. On the other hand, if you want to get well back into national forests you’ll have to think a lot smaller. So you trade space for access. I would write off any car entirely, and also mini-vans. A pickup or big SUV is likely the best option. But pay no attention to the mythical tow rating, it’s almost a sure bet you’ll run out of the vehicle payload before you get near it. And if you get close to the payload and want to do a lot of mountain driving it won’t be much of a fun tow. So as said, a lot of compromises and you need to educate yourself well before you commit to anything. For someone new to RV’s it’s smart to buy a used one first because after you use one for awhile it begins to gell what you really want in an RV. And if bought new it’s an expensive exercise to change. Owning and operating a TT is a piece of cake that you’ll pick up fast. When I bought my F150 my thought was to get a small FW. Then as I got educated I realized the pin weight of a FW could be an issue and the deal breaker, it was too high to get down the forest roads I camp on. My suggestion would be to look at a lot of RV’s, read the “stickies” on the forum and ask a lot of questions as you go along and you’ll make a good selection.
rfryer 04/18/14 02:49pm Travel Trailers
RE: Boondocking safety

My perception of boondocking is out in a remote and rough area well away from any form of civilization and neighbors, and in over 50 years of camping I’ve never lost a single thing.And it's not all that unusual for me to be gone before daylight and back after dark. You wouldn’t get a MH back in those areas so I think you’re probably talking about dry camping by yourself away from dedicated campgrounds. Regardless of one’s definitions, it’s a given that the closer to civilization you are and the easier the access the more risk you have of something walking away. And a MH would be a better target than a tent or small RV. But it would still be far safer than it would be in a parking lot in the city. Even in a campground I’ve only lost an ice chest once, and that was on a weekend when the cg was full of people from the city. It’s not something I’d be overly concerned about, just don’t leave anything of value sitting out in plain sight and if you carry barbeques or generators or other equipment lock them up.
rfryer 04/18/14 12:57pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Heading out west - snake precautions.

If you keep your dog on a leash so you can control him you shouldn’t have any problem. Especially in a parking lot which is flat and open. If it’s hot they’ll stay in the shade of rocks and brush. If cool you may find them on the pavement soaking up some heat. But they don’t normally “attack” people or dogs. And they don’t always rattle, either. Just be watchful, keep the dog away from rock piles and brush and you should be fine.
rfryer 04/18/14 10:46am RV Pet Stop
RE: travel trailer vs hybrid for long term living

I camped and traveled all over the west for over 20 years with a tent and PU so I understand your liking for canvas. But your post leaves me hanging a bit. Are you talking about working somewhere and living in the HTT? In which case you have to deal with the seasonal weather. Or are you just traveling and can move with the weather? And what’s long term living? Are you staying on public land or in commercial parks? There are a VERY FEW campgrounds in the national parks that don’t allow canvas because of potential bear problems. I’ve personally never seen that restriction on any other public land and that’s where I camp almost exclusively. I don’t use commercial cg’s and can’t speak to them, but I would guess those that consider themselves “upscale” might restrict canvas. Both an HTT and TT would work, but even given the questions, for long term traveling or sitting in one place I think you’ll appreciate hard side over the HTT. No wet canvas to deal with, easier to heat and cool, and maybe a little better security. Or at least the perception of it.
rfryer 04/18/14 10:33am Travel Trailers
RE: Need buying tip

Of course they want to upsell you, it’s often more lucrative than the original purchase. I’d skip their magic sealant and you can apply Scotsguard yourself. You can get a lot of debate about extended warranties. They’re very profitable for the seller, thus the reason they push them so hard. My attitude is if I buy something new and on the leading edge of technology, it will have defects and may fail so I’ll at least consider a warranty. Otherwise I don’t consider them. With vehicles I just self insure – put the money in an account and use it for the repairs as needed. The odds are heavily in your favor you’ll come out ahead. I might waver on a MH, but on a TT or small FW I’d pass. I think they’re mostly a peace of mind thing that people are willing to pay for. If you’re inclined to get one, get a copy and read the fine print like a lawyer. That’s where all the deductibles, caps and exclusions are that will reduce the coverage you think you’re getting on the surface. Keep in mind, too, you don’t have to buy at the time of FW purchase, you can buy later or from another source, and you can negotiate the price like anything else. Good luck and congratulations on the new FW.
rfryer 04/17/14 01:09pm Beginning RVing
RE: Northern Yellowstone

I thought the 18SB was a hybrid, not a FW. But no matter, it’s still small. Going from memory, which can be dangerous for me, if you use a generator they’re not allowed in Tower, Slough, Pebble Creek, Lewis Lake and Indian Creek campgrounds. Slough is a couple of miles from the pavement, has about 30 sites, and I seem to remember is mostly tents. But a good place to see wildlife. If you want 1st party info you can always check their website or even call the park. A great place to visit, have a nice trip.
rfryer 04/16/14 10:55am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Propane gas refrig

When lines are opened up they get air in them and it may take repeated tries to get the burner to light. Can you tell if the burner is lighting? If the stove is difficult to light that’s a pretty good indication of air in the lines. I sometimes have trouble lighting my frig and I light the stove burners for a few minutes. Seems to help even though the frig should be another line. If the burner's lighting I leave it to someone more knowledgeable to give you some input.
rfryer 04/14/14 02:15pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: My Security Precaution and Peace of Mind

In your defense, ocbms, just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean everybody isn’t out to get you. Being alert to your surroundings and the types of people around you is nothing but good common sense. Then you can decide if the risk of staying outweighs the reward. But photographing cars and people on the off chance they may be a threat is a bit over the top. And someone photographing and watching me is going to make me suspicious of their motives and warrant follow-up.
rfryer 04/12/14 11:03am RV Lifestyle
RE: What do you carry for protection?

I have quite a few options but I usually carry a 45 handgun. While a shot gun is the ultimate deterrent, at the range someone would be a threat it would make an awful mess. After a lifetime of camping and working in some relatively rough and wild areas I found you rarely ever are confronted with one perp, typically it’s three. So I consider bats, tazers and such as useless. And a long gun is awkward in tight quarters or sitting around the campfire. I’ve never had to draw one in 50 years of camping. But on at least three occasions my well developed sense of a threat was deafening and I was glad I had it. On the other hand, at home in the city I’ve had four occasions I recall where someone was trying to break in and once I came home early from work and had a burglar at gunpoint in the bedroom. So I think msmith1199,s post is right on the money. My youngest son is in his early thirties and likes to shoot occasionally but isn’t into guns like I am. So I was a little surprised years ago when he asked me for a handgun to keep at the house. And not long ago he reminded me of an incident when he was young where someone was working on a kitchen window to break in. He was scared to death and it made a big impression on him that I was calmly sitting in the darkened kitchen with my handgun on the table waiting. And he realized he shouldn’t be scared, the guy outside should be. So my thought is if someone has the means and temperament to protect themselves they have that right. And if they are willing to trust in faith it won’t happen to them they also have that right. So don't keep us guessing. Did you should him when he got the window open? No, he wasn’t able to get the window open. I have no desire to shoot anyone at all, but he’s the aggressor and it’s his choice how the situation ends. Of the break-ins I mentioned only once did one actually get in the house, very late at night. I was waiting for him behind the door at the top of the basement stairs and heard him coming up. Then DW #1 came out and put her hand on my shoulder. Big mistake, I decked her and he heard it and got back out the basement window before I could get down there. And I neglected to mention the incident where I left the house one night and two drunks tried to beat down the kitchen door. The DW, understandably, isn’t as aggressive as I am but our two kids were in bed and she wasn’t going to let them come in. So she called 911 and stood in the kitchen with my shotgun pointed at the door. Fortunately for them they were apparently so drunk or stupid they didn’t realize it was a solid core door and opened out, not in. But then those sorts of people aren’t too high on the intellectual scale anyway. They finally exhausted themselves and left before the police officer got there. He told her I couldn’t do it, but as a woman protecting her kids she could have shot them through the door. I told her I didn’t think that was a good idea, Give them an opportunity to weight the risk and reward first and then shoot if they came within about 10’ of her.
rfryer 04/10/14 02:40pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: When to grease those wheel bearings???

I think my manual says every 10,000 miles but I don’t go that long, I do it every other year and check and adjust the brakes, too. Though I’ve found they’re always good and could go longer. But I live in a dry area. In your weather you could get moisture in them so I would probably check them yearly to see if they needed greased or they could go a couple of years.
rfryer 04/10/14 01:42pm Hybrid Travel Trailers
RE: "Old fashioned State Parks?

I found dewey02’s post very informative. My perspective differs from the OP’s, though, in that I don’t think that concessionaires belong on public land and I consider “improvements” as destructive rather than a plus. Some improved campgrounds close to the highway are OK, but trying to “improve” most of them would defeat the whole purpose of camping. I might as well stay in a Wal-Mart parking lot.
rfryer 04/10/14 01:33pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Family - - - too little, too late

Everybody goes through that when they deal with multiple people and multiple schedules whether it’s hunting trips, camping trips or just get togethers. If I invite someone and they reply and say they have a conflict and can we change the date I can often do that and will. But they know me well enough to know if they don’t reply I consider they declined and they’re on their own. Last minute doesn’t bother me a lot but it’s up to them to jump through whatever hoops they have to to pull it off. But then I don’t go anywhere where I have to book a site.
rfryer 04/10/14 12:51pm Family Camping
RE: What do you carry for protection?

I have quite a few options but I usually carry a 45 handgun. While a shot gun is the ultimate deterrent, at the range someone would be a threat it would make an awful mess. After a lifetime of camping and working in some relatively rough and wild areas I found you rarely ever are confronted with one perp, typically it’s three. So I consider bats, tazers and such as useless. And a long gun is awkward in tight quarters or sitting around the campfire. I’ve never had to draw one in 50 years of camping. But on at least three occasions my well developed sense of a threat was deafening and I was glad I had it. On the other hand, at home in the city I’ve had four occasions I recall where someone was trying to break in and once I came home early from work and had a burglar at gunpoint in the bedroom. So I think msmith1199,s post is right on the money. My youngest son is in his early thirties and likes to shoot occasionally but isn’t into guns like I am. So I was a little surprised years ago when he asked me for a handgun to keep at the house. And not long ago he reminded me of an incident when he was young where someone was working on a kitchen window to break in. He was scared to death and it made a big impression on him that I was calmly sitting in the darkened kitchen with my handgun on the table waiting. And he realized he shouldn’t be scared, the guy outside should be. So my thought is if someone has the means and temperament to protect themselves they have that right. And if they are willing to trust in faith it won’t happen to them they also have that right.
rfryer 04/10/14 12:23pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Planning trips

I like to plan trips and do it pretty thoroughly. But when I travel I like to wander at whim and rarely ever follow the plan. I may wind up in the same general area, but then again I may go an entirely different direction. I guess I’m a little weird. I think the area one’s traveling in and the size of the rig are big factors. Most of my travel is in the west with a lot of public land. And I pull a 16’ TT so there are few places I can’t get into. It’s rare that I can’t get a site without reservations even in the national parks in prime time. If I had a big rig or was in an area with little public land I’m sure my mode of travel would be quite different. Then too, I’m a dry camper and boondocker and don’t use commercial or FHU sites. And I’ve only used a state park once in my life, a bit too overdeveloped for my taste. Typically, I just take off in the general direction that I planned. If I see something that attracts my interest I’ll go in that direction. I never know where I’ll wind up or where I’ll camp that night. Late in the afternoon when I have an idea when I need to stop I check the maps and literature I carry for a camping area. My first choice is always national forest cg’s or other public land. On rare occasions there may not be any in the area. Then the DW calls ahead to commercial cg’s to see if they have an opening and though that’s a rare event we’ve never failed to get a site. If one likes the security of having a reserved site, they wouldn’t like that mode of travel. But the total freedom to wander at will far outweighs any downside to me. Maybe I was a hobo in another life.:)
rfryer 04/10/14 10:59am Travel Trailers
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