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 > Your search for posts made by 'rfryer' found 265 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Propane gas refrig

When lines are opened up they get air in them and it may take repeated tries to get the burner to light. Can you tell if the burner is lighting? If the stove is difficult to light that’s a pretty good indication of air in the lines. I sometimes have trouble lighting my frig and I light the stove burners for a few minutes. Seems to help even though the frig should be another line. If the burner's lighting I leave it to someone more knowledgeable to give you some input.
rfryer 04/14/14 02:15pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: My Security Precaution and Peace of Mind

In your defense, ocbms, just because you’re paranoid doesn’t mean everybody isn’t out to get you. Being alert to your surroundings and the types of people around you is nothing but good common sense. Then you can decide if the risk of staying outweighs the reward. But photographing cars and people on the off chance they may be a threat is a bit over the top. And someone photographing and watching me is going to make me suspicious of their motives and warrant follow-up.
rfryer 04/12/14 11:03am RV Lifestyle
RE: What do you carry for protection?

I have quite a few options but I usually carry a 45 handgun. While a shot gun is the ultimate deterrent, at the range someone would be a threat it would make an awful mess. After a lifetime of camping and working in some relatively rough and wild areas I found you rarely ever are confronted with one perp, typically it’s three. So I consider bats, tazers and such as useless. And a long gun is awkward in tight quarters or sitting around the campfire. I’ve never had to draw one in 50 years of camping. But on at least three occasions my well developed sense of a threat was deafening and I was glad I had it. On the other hand, at home in the city I’ve had four occasions I recall where someone was trying to break in and once I came home early from work and had a burglar at gunpoint in the bedroom. So I think msmith1199,s post is right on the money. My youngest son is in his early thirties and likes to shoot occasionally but isn’t into guns like I am. So I was a little surprised years ago when he asked me for a handgun to keep at the house. And not long ago he reminded me of an incident when he was young where someone was working on a kitchen window to break in. He was scared to death and it made a big impression on him that I was calmly sitting in the darkened kitchen with my handgun on the table waiting. And he realized he shouldn’t be scared, the guy outside should be. So my thought is if someone has the means and temperament to protect themselves they have that right. And if they are willing to trust in faith it won’t happen to them they also have that right. So don't keep us guessing. Did you should him when he got the window open? No, he wasn’t able to get the window open. I have no desire to shoot anyone at all, but he’s the aggressor and it’s his choice how the situation ends. Of the break-ins I mentioned only once did one actually get in the house, very late at night. I was waiting for him behind the door at the top of the basement stairs and heard him coming up. Then DW #1 came out and put her hand on my shoulder. Big mistake, I decked her and he heard it and got back out the basement window before I could get down there. And I neglected to mention the incident where I left the house one night and two drunks tried to beat down the kitchen door. The DW, understandably, isn’t as aggressive as I am but our two kids were in bed and she wasn’t going to let them come in. So she called 911 and stood in the kitchen with my shotgun pointed at the door. Fortunately for them they were apparently so drunk or stupid they didn’t realize it was a solid core door and opened out, not in. But then those sorts of people aren’t too high on the intellectual scale anyway. They finally exhausted themselves and left before the police officer got there. He told her I couldn’t do it, but as a woman protecting her kids she could have shot them through the door. I told her I didn’t think that was a good idea, Give them an opportunity to weight the risk and reward first and then shoot if they came within about 10’ of her.
rfryer 04/10/14 02:40pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: When to grease those wheel bearings???

I think my manual says every 10,000 miles but I don’t go that long, I do it every other year and check and adjust the brakes, too. Though I’ve found they’re always good and could go longer. But I live in a dry area. In your weather you could get moisture in them so I would probably check them yearly to see if they needed greased or they could go a couple of years.
rfryer 04/10/14 01:42pm Hybrid Travel Trailers
RE: "Old fashioned State Parks?

I found dewey02’s post very informative. My perspective differs from the OP’s, though, in that I don’t think that concessionaires belong on public land and I consider “improvements” as destructive rather than a plus. Some improved campgrounds close to the highway are OK, but trying to “improve” most of them would defeat the whole purpose of camping. I might as well stay in a Wal-Mart parking lot.
rfryer 04/10/14 01:33pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Family - - - too little, too late

Everybody goes through that when they deal with multiple people and multiple schedules whether it’s hunting trips, camping trips or just get togethers. If I invite someone and they reply and say they have a conflict and can we change the date I can often do that and will. But they know me well enough to know if they don’t reply I consider they declined and they’re on their own. Last minute doesn’t bother me a lot but it’s up to them to jump through whatever hoops they have to to pull it off. But then I don’t go anywhere where I have to book a site.
rfryer 04/10/14 12:51pm Family Camping
RE: What do you carry for protection?

I have quite a few options but I usually carry a 45 handgun. While a shot gun is the ultimate deterrent, at the range someone would be a threat it would make an awful mess. After a lifetime of camping and working in some relatively rough and wild areas I found you rarely ever are confronted with one perp, typically it’s three. So I consider bats, tazers and such as useless. And a long gun is awkward in tight quarters or sitting around the campfire. I’ve never had to draw one in 50 years of camping. But on at least three occasions my well developed sense of a threat was deafening and I was glad I had it. On the other hand, at home in the city I’ve had four occasions I recall where someone was trying to break in and once I came home early from work and had a burglar at gunpoint in the bedroom. So I think msmith1199,s post is right on the money. My youngest son is in his early thirties and likes to shoot occasionally but isn’t into guns like I am. So I was a little surprised years ago when he asked me for a handgun to keep at the house. And not long ago he reminded me of an incident when he was young where someone was working on a kitchen window to break in. He was scared to death and it made a big impression on him that I was calmly sitting in the darkened kitchen with my handgun on the table waiting. And he realized he shouldn’t be scared, the guy outside should be. So my thought is if someone has the means and temperament to protect themselves they have that right. And if they are willing to trust in faith it won’t happen to them they also have that right.
rfryer 04/10/14 12:23pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Planning trips

I like to plan trips and do it pretty thoroughly. But when I travel I like to wander at whim and rarely ever follow the plan. I may wind up in the same general area, but then again I may go an entirely different direction. I guess I’m a little weird. I think the area one’s traveling in and the size of the rig are big factors. Most of my travel is in the west with a lot of public land. And I pull a 16’ TT so there are few places I can’t get into. It’s rare that I can’t get a site without reservations even in the national parks in prime time. If I had a big rig or was in an area with little public land I’m sure my mode of travel would be quite different. Then too, I’m a dry camper and boondocker and don’t use commercial or FHU sites. And I’ve only used a state park once in my life, a bit too overdeveloped for my taste. Typically, I just take off in the general direction that I planned. If I see something that attracts my interest I’ll go in that direction. I never know where I’ll wind up or where I’ll camp that night. Late in the afternoon when I have an idea when I need to stop I check the maps and literature I carry for a camping area. My first choice is always national forest cg’s or other public land. On rare occasions there may not be any in the area. Then the DW calls ahead to commercial cg’s to see if they have an opening and though that’s a rare event we’ve never failed to get a site. If one likes the security of having a reserved site, they wouldn’t like that mode of travel. But the total freedom to wander at will far outweighs any downside to me. Maybe I was a hobo in another life.:)
rfryer 04/10/14 10:59am Travel Trailers
RE: Trip advice - New to RV'ing and from London UK!

Tonyandkaren’s suggestion isn’t a bad loop. But it’s near a 1,000 mile trip. So if you want to drive 3 days and sight-see 4 days you’ll be driving about 6 or 7 hours on the driving days. And at best you’ll only have a day at each place, not much time for extracurricular activities. You could trim a couple of hundred miles off by going from Zion to Grand Canyon to Sedona and on to Vegas. But I can’t suggest anything shorter and still be able to see any nice country. With a week you’ll just have to settle for a taste of what you see and plan another trip to those places you really like. As far as roads go you could take I-15 and then route 9 into Zion. And then 89 and 64 to the Canyon. If you go to Sedona you can go back to 89 or take 64 to Williams, then I-40 back to Flagstaff. To Sedona you have two choices, I-17 to route 179, then on to Sedona. Or 89A from Flagstaff to Sedona. The latter is a very pretty drive. But it’s a two lane mountain road with steep grades and tight curves. It’s your call whether you would be comfortable with that. If you have a big RV I-17 is probably the better choice. Good luck and I hope you have an enjoyable trip.
rfryer 04/08/14 11:50am Beginning RVing
RE: Extended Warranty

For the most part extended warranties aren’t a good move. A few people with bad luck come out ahead while most would be better off setting the money aside for possible repairs and they won’t spend it all. You have other options, too. You can buy later, or from a third party, and sometimes from the manufacturer. Although I’m not sure how common the latter is in the RV industry. It’s more of a peace of mind thing than a good financial move, but if you’re inclined to go for it it’s critical you read the fine print like a lawyer. Between the deductibles, caps, and exclusions, like “A’ isn’t covered if it fails because of a failure of “B” you may have less coverage than appears on the surface. Lastly, there’s serious money in selling the warranties and you can negotiate the price like anything else.
rfryer 04/07/14 03:43pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Trip advice - New to RV'ing and from London UK!

Couldn’t be said any better than kaydeejay said it. With a week you’ll barely be able to scratch the surface and you’ll be pushing hard to do that. For example, if you were at the Grand Canyon and wanted to visit the Tombstone area it would be about a 430 mile drive. With that time you’ll have to take the interstates to cover any ground, the worst way to see AZ. But it is what it is. That means I-40 across northern AZ and I-17 north and south. Unless you’re in southern CA, then it would be I-8 or I-10. I think it would be best to select the places you really want to see, give yourself some non-driving time to see them, and then ask on the forum about the routes to take.
rfryer 04/07/14 03:18pm Beginning RVing
RE: What will I run out of first?

I wouldn’t run out of any of it in 3 days and I have a small TT with less capacity than yours. I dry camp and typically I run out of battery power first, then fresh water, then gray tank, black tank and propane. If you have electric HU’s, then you don’t have an issue with the battery, if you take long showers you do with the fresh and gray water and so on. It all depends on how frugal you are with your resources.
rfryer 04/07/14 10:07am Beginning RVing
RE: Maintenance schedule app/spreadsheet

I’ve never run across one I liked so I just made up a spreadsheet on Excel. Took just a few minutes and captures all the recommended scheduled maintenance, how often it’s due, when it was done, when it’s due again, and the specs for the maintenance. I have spreadsheets out the kazoo that record mileage, gas, my trips, and so on but I haven’t bothered to tie them together. A project I’d like to do sometime if I ever get time to do so. I’ve told the DW a number of times I don’t know how I ever had time to work a full time job.
rfryer 04/05/14 02:30pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Preparing to hit the road

The house isn’t hard. We turn the water heater to “vacation”, turn the ac up pretty high in summer and off when it’s cool. I put a temporary halt on cable/net/phone; it saves me about $150.00/mo. My mail slot is in the garage and I have a big container, so mail isn’t an issue. At my prior house I had a mailbox so I had to depend on my son or neighbors to collect the mail. The DW’s sister took the indoor plants and my irrigation took care of the outside. I checked the house and eliminated anything I thought could be a fire hazard. The sheriff checked my house about once a week and the neighbors watched it all the time. About once a month my son would come by and check the interior and cut the grass if needed. Bills were the biggest headache. I keep my finances on Quicken and after a couple of train wrecks I just went through it and found all the bills I pay in the time frame I’m gone. I don’t like automatic payment, so I use my laptop to access the sites and pay them online while I’m gone.
rfryer 04/05/14 02:18pm RV Lifestyle
RE: Scottish family rving for first time

How far you can get depends on how much you stop to see the areas because that obviously reduces your driving time. I’m guessing that the loop you’re looking at is approaching 3000 miles and if you spend half of your days traveling and half sightseeing you’re probably covering about 200 miles a day average. Some days you can do better, one long, hard day’s drive could get you to Twin Falls from Las Vegas, it’s about 500 miles. If I were making that trip I’d use “MS Streets and Trips” or one of the online sites to plan where I wanted to go and how long I wanted to stay. Typically, it would run over the time I had so I’d have to adjust where I went or how long I stayed until I found something workable. If you’re going to Twin Falls you’d be remiss not to go to Yellowstone and the Tetons. You wouldn’t be able to spend much time there, but you could get a taste of it. July is prime time, though, and depending how big your RV is you’ll likely need to make an advance reservation to camp there. There are some commercial cg’s outside the park but I’ve never used them and don’t know if you’d need reservations. If you like caves and come through northern AZ check out the Lava River Cave. It’s on hwy 180, the road from Flagstaff to Grand Canyon. It’s about ¾ mile long and colder than a well diggers behind even in summer. Not for the claustrophobic, though. Have a great trip, I’ve traveled all over the west with my two granddaughters and they are really fond memories.
rfryer 04/05/14 12:45pm Beginning RVing
RE: Is .22mag snake shot enough for moccasins?

A shotgun would seem overkill to me. Any center fire pistol shot round should work. When I was younger I did a lot of survey work in the boonies and stumbled over a lot of rattlers pushing through the brush. If they were close enough to be a threat I shot them with a 22 revolver with LR's. Of course you need a head shot.Shot's the best option if there's any development around, but I have reservations about 22 shot.
rfryer 04/04/14 04:22pm General RVing Issues
RE: How many different TT models are there?

I have a 1989 16’ Yukon TT and in that entire time I’ve only seen one other unit like it. And that was on I-17 well NO Phoenix. A fellow was towing one with a short wheel base Bronco II and it jackknifed on him stopping. They were standing along the freeway gray as ghosts and I stopped to see if they needed help. The only help he wanted was a bigger TV.
rfryer 04/04/14 04:03pm Travel Trailers
RE: What Do You Put On Windshield Chips, Etc.?

Yesterday I went to Safelite to ask about a rock chip repair. I have a large deductible on glass, so this would be out of pocket. I was told it would cost $99, no negotiating. They said almost everything they do goes through insurance companies, so they don't discount the price. Period. I'll probably try the auto parts store stuff. You might want to call your agent. Some insurance companies don't make it known that this is a benefit. Many insurance policies pay to have chips and small cracks repaired because they rather not pay for a new wind shield. X2. Are you sure your deductible applies to glass? I, of course, have deductibles, too. But they don't apply to glass and haven't with any policy I've had as far back as I can remember.It's cheaper for the insurance company to repair a chip than replace a windshield.
rfryer 04/04/14 11:43am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Do I need a full parking pad?

I’d check your zoning regs first, they may have requirements you’re not aware of. I parked mine for years in my side yard along the carport. It killed the grass and I wound up with a lot of dirt and I was considering graveling it when along came the city inspector. He informed me I had to have 4” of gravel, in essence a gravel driveway, to park a vehicle there. Otherwise it was equivalent to parking a vehicle in the front yard, a no no.
rfryer 04/03/14 09:46pm General RVing Issues
RE: Just bought our first RV

Welcome to the forum and congratulations on the new PU. I think you’ll have some great camping experiences ahead of you. I tent camped for about 18 years traveling all over the country in a tent. The downside of that was the constant packing and unpacking of gear when I was traveling so I finally got a Coleman PU. A great PU, all metal, small and light, and we took it all over the NW and east to the Smokies. I pulled it with a ’73 Bronco, a ’72 Torino and an ’86 Bronco and they were all an easy tow and the impact on gas mileage was negligible. I gave it to my oldest son years ago and got a small TT and the DW still comments she wishes we still had it for some trips; it gave more of a “camping” feel. As a tent camper it should be familiar territory to you, just treat it the same as a tent. If it gets wet open it up and let it dry out, don’t just park it. Yours is a little bigger and heavier than mine but I seriously doubt you’ll need any sway control; I never had a hint of it with any TV. Just take it out and try it in bite size increments and see how it handles. I found that I could expect to lose a tire on a long trip, and sometimes a wheel bearing. I got quiet adept at changing out wheel bearings along the road and I carried an extra spare tire and bearings. But it had small tires that got a workout on the highway; I just don’t recall now what the size was. Keep in mind that if you want to use the furnace it will eat your battery in a night, so you’ll need hookups, a generator, or another means of heating it. I used none of the above, I found that I could get up in the morning and light the stove for coffee and lay back down and in a few minutes the PU was warmed up. You don’t want to do that and doze off again, though. As said, practice backing up in a parking lot somewhere until you get a good handle on it. I have a different perspective about the difficulty of backing up. A big rig isn’t sensitive to minor tweaks of the wheel so it’s considered easier. Read less maneuverable. I camp in remote national forest locations where it’s tight quarters and maneuverability is king. So sensitivity to input is important and big rigs are harder to me. I’d pick a spot close to home for the first trip. Take a tape recorder or a pencil and tablet and record your thoughts about the trip. Things you took you don’t need, those you needed and didn’t take, and so on. Have fun.
rfryer 04/02/14 02:14pm Folding Trailers
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