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 > Your search for posts made by 'rocmoc' found 96 matches.

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RE: Puerto Penasco question

Easy road, don't speed, stay on main road. Pesos help but you can get by. $20 and smaller. Harder to get back into USA than it is to get into Mexico. Get Mexican Insurance. Enjoy! rocmoc n AZ
rocmoc 01/16/17 06:19pm RVing in Mexico and South America
RE: NEW to Mex - BUT not travel

You will have fun. A first easy taste to RVing in Mexico. rocmoc n AZ
rocmoc 01/16/17 08:01am RVing in Mexico and South America
RE: Cooler in Arizona this year?

Live just South of Tucson and weather has been colder and wetter. Currently in Lake Havasu, AZ and locals say and IMHO weather is cooler thu Q is cooler. Could not launch at the Balloon Fest this morning because of the poor weather. Plus can't remember the last time Quartzsite had flash floods like they have had this winter. rocmoc n AZ
rocmoc 01/13/17 10:29am Snowbirds
RE: Should we expect gas/diesel shortages from Nogales - PV?

From Nogales International, http://www.nogalesinternational.com/news/mexico-s-gasolinazo-sends-consumers-to-u-s-pumps/article_32258516-d3ab-11e6-a52a-6b213311d043.html While angry protests over a sudden spike in gas prices raged in Nogales, Sonora and across Mexico on Wednesday, Alma Rivera waited in a line of cars with Sonoran license plates backed up two or three to a pump at the Circle K on Mariposa Road. Rivera was waging war on ballooning gasoline prices another way – with her wallet. “The price has been going up all year. It was seven (pesos per liter), then eight, then 10 and now they put it at 16,” she said. “Until they fix this, I’m going to have to come across to buy gas.” While U.S. gas has long been popular with Mexican consumers, the steadily weakening Mexican peso had made cross-border fill-ups less financially appealing in recent months. But since pump prices surged in Nogales, Sonora on New Year’s Day, jumping past $3 per gallon, station owners and customers say the number of Mexican customers pumping gas in Nogales, Ariz. has been increasing. “Even though the exchange rate for the dollar is at 20 pesos, it’s in our best interest to pump gas here,” Rivera said. “I don’t usually cross the line that often because of the wait, but I’m going to have to now.” The gasoline industry in Mexico is dominated by the state-owned company Petróleos Mexicanos, or Pemex. In late December, the federal government announced it would start eliminating gasoline subsidies on Jan. 1 as part of a process of deregulating the petroleum industry. That deregulation is a result of an energy sector overhaul passed in 2013 designed to open the fuel market to private development. Commonly referred to as the “gasolinazo,” the adjustment raised prices at the nation’s Pemex stations by as much as 20 percent overnight on Dec. 31. Beginning in February, daily adjustments at the pump are planned to gradually establish prices that reflect market values. The costs vary across the country, averaging about 16 pesos per liter for basic unleaded gasoline (the equivalent of approximately $3 a gallon). And while the Mexican government had promised that stations in northern border communities would receive a stimulus to keep prices on par with U.S. competitors, that hasn’t been the case in Nogales, Sonora. The prices were set to start at 13.07 pesos per liter, but prices across the city are hitting the maximum 16.23 pesos per liter, or about $3.08 per gallon, for the lowest quality gas. Premium gas was selling for nearly $3.50 per gallon. By comparison, gas stations in Nogales, Ariz. were selling regular unleaded gas for about $2.05 to $2.30 per gallon on Wednesday afternoon. “It looks like I’ll be coming to this side to pump gas a lot more now,” said Nogales, Sonora resident Carlos Morales while filling his tank at a Nogales, Ariz. gas station on Wednesday. Morales has always filled up on the U.S. side of the border when it’s convenient because the gasoline is higher quality and better regulated, he said. Now the price hike has made it a necessity. He’s not alone. An increasing number of customers from Sonora, some with car windows emblazoned with “No gasolinazo” and “No Peña Nieto” – a reference to embattled Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto, who has borne much of the brunt of the price-hike backlash – are turning up at gas stations in Nogales already in 2017, said Bert Guerrero, manager at the Fastrip station on the corner of Mariposa Road and Grand Avenue. This time of year is always busy with holiday travelers from Mexico. But after noticing a dramatic uptick, Guerrero started hearing from customers about how U.S. gas is now about a dollar less per gallon than at stations south of the border. “There’s also a difference in how much they spend,” he said. “A lot of times people will spend $10 or $20 to top off, but we saw a huge increase with people spending $40 or even more.” The increased spending at the pump hasn’t benefited merchandise sales in his adjacent convenience store, Guerrero said, but that doesn’t mean it won’t if the trend continues. “It has to help,” said Art Grimm III, who owns Big Art’s filling station on Mariposa Road, just east of Interstate 19. “Any time you have more traffic in your facility it helps you. I don’t care if it’s three people more that you didn’t have, it helps.” Grimm has seen an increased flow of customers in the past few days and expects the trend to continue, he said. Boycotts and protests Of course, frequent trips to Nogales, Ariz. aren’t an option for everyone south of the border. Hours-long lines at the ports of entry, the lack of a U.S. visa or long drives are all deterrents. “I won’t be coming up more often because I live in Hermosillo,” said Luis Bernal, who was filling his tank in Nogales for a trip to Phoenix on Wednesday. For Bernal, the cost to fill up his truck with Pemex gas increased about $15 on Jan. 1, he said, which is why he joined a boycott of Mexican gas stations. “It’s a plan to pressure the government not to charge so much for gas. I had to put in a little to get here, but I waited to fill up until I got across the l