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 > Your search for posts made by 'soren' found 179 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Oil Change on the road

Chevy truck! Chevy Dealer! Thanks for your valuable contribution.
soren 07/24/17 03:04pm Beginning RVing
RE: Coach-Net has changed it's business practices for the worse

I just finished the online renew of my basis level ERS with CN. This covers everything I need for my motorhome, but it is not a "Premier" all vehicle family policy, nor does it offer silly stuff like "Concierge services" or "pet return assistance". The standard renewal rate for a motorhome is $79, and I used a $10 discount coupon they emailed me, for a total of $69. I agree with some posters here. Their website is a slick, poorly done train wreck. They provide no easy access to info. about renewal pricing, or the basic policy. If I were shopping for a new policy today, their $100 bump in the first year pricing would be a deal breaker. I hope this idea is a failure for them, and they return to doing business in a more honorable fashion. I was disappointed to see the slick sales pitch and overall sleaziness of the website, "Paint protection warranty"? Come on, that is 1980s car dealer saleslizard stuff, not something a reputable company gets involved with. Sad.
soren 07/24/17 12:58pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Oil Change on the road

Go to walmart buy disposal oil drain pan about $6, buy oil and filter, lift MH on jacks/levers, drain oil , take pan back to walmart. That's the ticket.....yeah boy They will accept your used oil and pan? The rig is an Ford F53 chassis and if you have ever changed oil on one, you know that the oil pan plug and filter drain directly over the front axle, making a mess if you don't build some sort of flow diverter to direct the draining oil. Just plain messy. A petcock for the pan is fine but it does not help with the filter mess. I was under the impression that most RV parks frowned on doing maintenance on their grounds. Also, I pull a Toad which puts added strain on the engine, which has about 50,000 mi on it. I was thinking changing at 5,000 mi. Thanks again all. I have done oil changes on my Ford F53 chassis at least 5-6 times on the road and have developed a process that doesn't spill a drop. First step is a trip to Walmart for a five qt. and one qt. container of Motorcraft semi-syn oil, a Motorcraft filter, and a $0.88 disposable tinfoil roasting pan. Onboard, I have a six quart drain pan, a standard funnel and a filter wrench. I use a utility knife to cut a 3/4" hole in one corner of the bottom of the tin pan and place it above the front axle and steering link. You will find that this allows the pan to sit at a nice angle, tilting forward and fully supported. I then pull the plug, and let the oil splash into the pan, which acts as a giant funnel that drains into my plastic drain pan. Next I pull the filter. After the filter and plug are replaced the tin pan gets folded up for the garbage, without a drop on the ground. Next it's fill time. My rig has a fill neck that is nearly tight to the bottom of the dash, preventing anybody from filling the oil in a civilized manner. I used to screw around with long neck funnels, hoses, etc.. but now I just dump the quart bottle in. (that can be done without spilling) Then I quickly refill the empty quart, five times, using a funnel, while emptying the five qt. jug. After the oil is successfully changed, it's a simple matter of reusing the five qt. jug to pour the dirty oil in. Since this oil is hot, the jug will distend a bit and fit all the old oil. After any cleanup, the jug heads to any auto parts store, or Walmart for recycling. I have done this in campgrounds (with permission,of course. On this forum, I have to say that, to get it in before the keyboard police lose their minds ;)) but I typically find an abandoned lot or gravel area where it's obvious that nobody would care what I'm doing. Whole job takes 20 minutes and costs less than thirty bucks. In the past I have successfully found places to do the job, but it is typically a hassle to find anybody that wants to work on big stuff, it's expensive, and there is the magical upcharge once you say the word "motorhome" for many shops. Doing the work on my rig is one of the easiest oil changes I do, but many shops quote ridiculous figures to do it.
soren 07/24/17 06:45am Beginning RVing
RE: Rebuilding a 5th wheel from the frame up.

You will only find Spruce at the home stores. Look for Fir, very stiff and stays straight much better. Thats what was used for aircraft. Art. I buy fir framing all the time at my local, east coast Lowes. As bob's your uncle correctly points out, a lot of posters don't understand that there are a lot of ways to quickly add up the pounds on a rebuild, and that thinking in terms of typical sticks and bricks construction would be a disaster. Especially when it comes to questions about using full 2x4s for sidewalls, or the lack of wall sheathing under the siding. To put it in perspective, I owned a custom home building company that occasionally worked with modular homes. Since prefinished sections of the home roll to the jobsite from the factory, the weight of that section of the home is documented. Even though it's taking things to a silly extreme, based on those weights, an 8'x32' home, built to common specs, could easily weigh 8000 to 10,000 pounds. Now this would need appliances, furniture, tanks, a full frame, and axles added. I doubt that a "sticks and tin" style trailer "box" weights much more of a third of weight of a theoretical sticks and bricks framed box.
soren 07/24/17 05:53am Do It Yourself Modifications and Upgrades (DIY)
RE: Coach-Net has changed it's business practices for the worse

Hard to find a thread with more confused people and misinformation. I have my Coach-Net renewal bill in my hand. Full roadside assistance, towing, and everything I expect from an Emergency roadside service policy is $79 a year. You can spend $149 for a lot of needless add-ons, and frills, but there is little reason for the average RVer to need it. So, lets review. The product is available online or via snail mail, and you do not have to obtain it from an RV dealer, or go to one to renew. A year of coverage renewal is $79, NOT $150, and I have an email from then with a 10% renewal discount, so this year, it's even cheaper. Not talking about ERS, talking about the insurance products. You completely fail to mention that important fact in your original post, then wait until the end of the second page of a thread to mention it. Really? Read my first sentence, tell me I'm wrong, and that you didn't create most of the confusion. I've been with CN for many years, had no idea that they sell "insurance products" and couldn't care. When you state that Coach-net MUST be purchased at your selling dealer, strangely enough, the vast majority of members believe you are making a really strange claim regarding ERS.
soren 07/21/17 10:50am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Coach-Net has changed it's business practices for the worse

Hard to find a thread with more confused people and misinformation. I have my Coach-Net renewal bill in my hand. Full roadside assistance, towing, and everything I expect from an Emergency roadside service policy is $79 a year. You can spend $149 for a lot of needless add-ons, and frills, but there is little reason for the average RVer to need it. So, lets review. The product is available online or via snail mail, and you do not have to obtain it from an RV dealer, or go to one to renew. A year of coverage renewal is $79, NOT $150, and I have an email from then with a 10% renewal discount, so this year, it's even cheaper.
soren 07/21/17 09:32am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Extended Service Quotes

Please do not allow yourself to get screwed out of $4500 for a warranty that you don't need, will have difficulty finding somebody to honor, and will regret. First, most competent shops are booked solid, for weeks and months ahead, so if you have a problem you better learn to live with it, or get used to your camper sitting in the dealers lot for weeks on end, until it gets repaired. Second, most parts of the country have one, or more, independent mobile RV mechanics that are competent, MUCH cheaper than dealers, and tend to get things fixed in days, not months. Finally, odd's are you will either never make a claim on that grossly overpriced warranty, or you will make one or two, and be bitterly disappointed with the overall experience of getting them to pay. $4500 in your savings account is FAR more useful to you that wasting it on a warranty that, statistically speaking, almost never provides you with $4500 of value for the $4500 you wasted on it.
soren 07/20/17 05:54pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: What models of trailers are well built?

I would say you got REAL lucky with the Wilderness. I had a 2003 built in the Maryland plant. By the time it was two years old, it was heading back to the factory for a total rebuild. The entire floor was rotten out. At that time my dealer had stopped accepting units built at another one of the Fleetwood plants, as the quality was so bad that he was spending dozens of hours finishing and repairing them before they were even marginally acceptable. You mentioned a 2009 fleetwood. By the time the recession hit, the company was in bad shape, with stock trading for pennies, and they went under. IMHO, they were far from great products in the 2000s, and by the time 2009 rolled around, the company was about a corpse, so I wouldn't be expecting that they were doing their best work by that point.
soren 07/20/17 02:30pm Travel Trailers
RE: Crazy driving

Poor people drive old rigs. As long as they are within the speed limit and otherwise driving legally, they have as much rights to the road as the guy running above the speed limit in a million-dollar land-yacht; actually, the poor guy following the law by definition is more in the right than the rich guy who's breaking the law by speeding. I couldn't care how rich anybody is, it has nothing to do with the conversation here. I drive an eleven year old gasser that I got one heck of a deal on, but it is also safe and well maintained. Am I poor or rich? Who cares. I'm talking about some of the slow crawling, rolling wrecks we see every year on that stretch of road. Missing cargo doors, beat up bodies, no bumpers, old pushers running with the engine cover propped half way open to help cool the motor, big hole where the generator was. I could give a rat's butt hair if the operators of these slow rolling traffic hazards are European royals, or dead broke. They are a physical hazard, and your turning this into some silly discussion of class, is just weird. BTW, the question was, where are all these slow RV drivers at, not about poor people driving the speed limit in rough rigs.
soren 07/17/17 04:36pm General RVing Issues
RE: What models of trailers are well built?

JMtandem, Wally took his Airstreams round the world so long ago, that Lincoln was scheduled to take Mary on a Byam tour, but something came up with an evening at some theater;) Seriously, I get the loyalty, but I've been through the whole Airstream event at the big Florida show, repeatedly, and I just don't see where the current stuff has much to do with back in the day? Lots of visably sketchy workmanship in the interiors, the same garbage appliances that a $15K trailer has, and from a company owned by Thor. Maybe all the magic is well hidden, but for me, I don't see the stellar quality and yacht grade attention to detail I would expect to see, for three times the price of a nicely equipped standard trailer, of the same size.
soren 07/17/17 04:12pm Travel Trailers
RE: What models of trailers are well built?

Let me ask ya'll this. Besides RVtrader, where else is a good place to look online? There are sites that can do wide searches on Craigslist for you. I have successfully used search tempest, but I'm sure there are others.
soren 07/17/17 03:59pm Travel Trailers
RE: Just an observation....

Does Ford mandate all synthetic? No they do not ! They "recommend" semi-syntheic but even that is NOT mandatory. I have been changing oil on cars for about 50 years now. It is easy. Motorcraft (Ford brand) semi-synthetic oil and filters can be purchased at most Walmart stores for less than $25. Yes, you need some wrenches, including an oil filter wrench, rags, a drain pan and some funnels to get the oil back into the jugs so you can take it to be recycled. Some large cardboard on the drive is an EXCELLENT idea. I used to do changes myself at home, then find a reasonable shop on the road, if our Class A Ford F53 needed it. I stopped wasting my time, however, when it became clear that it was taking longer, and very difficult to find anybody who agreed to do the work, and didn't want 2-3X what the job was worth. The last straw was calling around Anchorage, getting repeatedly turned down, then finding a place that was eager to do it for $149.00. Sure, I'll be there right after heck freezes over and monkeys fly. I grab the Motorcraft oil and filter for $25 at Walmart. I also pick up a $0.88 disposable tin foil roasting pan. The pan is a pretty slick trick. I use a utility knife to make a 1/2" hole in the bottom corner of the thing, then it sits, at an angle, on top of the axle and functions as a huge catch pan/funnel to drain the oil pan and let the filter splash into. It leaves the tin foil pan and falls into a typical plastic oil change pan. No mess at all, not even a drop on the ground. Like you, I refill the new jug with dirty oil and drop it off for recycling.
soren 07/16/17 01:47pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Buyers complaining about Ultra-Lite floor. What to do?

We went to a few shows this past winter, and noticed the same thing in several brand new units--the floor felt weirdly soft. Almost as if there was padding under the vinyl. Might be just that. If you take a look at the flooring department of a big box store, you will see that a lot of the newer, trendy, vinyl sheet goods are thick and spongy, essentially having a built in padding. I'm not a fan, especially once you see somebody move a kitchen fridge a few inches before they realize that they gouged the floor and are pulling it like taffy.
soren 07/16/17 07:23am Travel Trailers
RE: Buyers complaining about Ultra-Lite floor. What to do?

If they're all that way from day 1, just invite any lookers to visit a dealer and check out a new one, then come back for a good deal. Doesn't really work that way. The assemble is sandwich of beadboard foam and thin, really thin plywood, with an occasional square, hollow aluminum tube as a "floor joist". My old Trail-Lite had these at least 30" apart. Over time, under the load of foot traffic, the the foam starts to deflect between supports and lose rigidity. So, a brand new rig will feel fine.So the OP wasn't being truthful when he said "...that is the way it was from day one." That's what I based my comment on. I'm not suggesting that. I'm sure that some might perceive an ultra-light to have a soft floor, right from the factory. OTOH, after a few years of use, it's not a matter of being ultra-sensitive to the issue, in my experience it was a matter of actually knowing that you are standing on a piece of tubing, rather than the "in the dip". Fact is, many of these things are just junk. The old trail lite I had had laminated panels for the roof too. Problem was, they weren't even strong enough to support the AC unit. Eventually, the rig had to be parked with the nose up, while not in use, since the center of the roof sagged so much that the AC would be sitting in an 1-1/2 puddle of water. Laminated walls are fine, but a quality rig needs floor joists, an adequate plywood subfloor, real rafters, and adequate plywood roof sheathing, to go the distance.
soren 07/16/17 07:12am Travel Trailers
RE: Prescriptions on the road

We have had similar issues, including a CVS in Florida that put a lot of effort into attempting to deny a refill, even though my wife was a loyal customer of their's for decades, and a CVS in the northeast had a documented history of filling the script. Kind of ironic also, since the chain played a big roll in perpetuating the opoid crisis in FL. We also found that being a CVS customer was a big issue when traveling in some states, particularly in the the mountain states, as some of them have few, to no CVS stores. If you are doing a lot of traveling, all over the lower 48, I would definitely switch to Walmart, as they seem to be the only chain pharmacy that's absolutely everywhere.
soren 07/16/17 07:07am RVing with Disabilities and General Health Issues
RE: 2004 Tiffin Allegro Bay vs. 2008 Fleetwood Fiesta

A friend of mine is actually advising against the GM vortec engine - he says his last rig had that engine and anytime he had a problem it was super hard to find parts. Thoughts? Can't imagine exactly where your friend would be looking for parts, that there would be issues? Course there is a big difference between asking a kid at Autozone about something the doesn't instantly appear on his screen, and a lifer at NAPA who could hand you half the parts for that motor just from memory. Failing that, there is the Chevy dealer, where I would bet every part for that motor is available in a few days, or less. Were not talking about a Deere or Perkins diesel here, it's a popular truck engine built by one of the biggest engine manufacturers in the world.
soren 07/16/17 06:44am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Buyers complaining about Ultra-Lite floor. What to do?

At 3,740 pounds dry and 22 feet I consider my Winnie an ultra light. A spongy floor is not normal. Have your floor inspected by pro and certified....if it's not a leak issue. You are far from ultra light. We are talking about units that are 40% lighter than your's. You have tightly spaced floor joists sheathed with 5/8" tongue and groove plywood. No comparison to 3 or 5 MILLIMETER thick plywood glued to foam. So, in a used, true ultra-light trailer, spongy floors are common. I wouldn't spend a dime on another ultra-lite, but I wouldn't hesitate to by a rig like yours. Apples and oranges.
soren 07/16/17 06:33am Travel Trailers
RE: Buyers complaining about Ultra-Lite floor. What to do?

If they're all that way from day 1, just invite any lookers to visit a dealer and check out a new one, then come back for a good deal. Doesn't really work that way. The assemble is sandwich of beadboard foam and thin, really thin plywood, with an occasional square, hollow aluminum tube as a "floor joist". My old Trail-Lite had these at least 30" apart. Over time, under the load of foot traffic, the the foam starts to deflect between supports and lose rigidity. So, a brand new rig will feel fine. It gets so bad that mine had visible ridges on the floor where the tubing was. We have friends with a matching unit that they have kept for the last 17 years. It is literally well past the end of it's usable life and weights a lot more now, since the floor had to be covered with thick plywood to prevent further damage to the joke of a floor the factory installed.
soren 07/16/17 06:26am Travel Trailers
RE: First time buyer - how bad is water damage

We bought a used motorhome in Florida. We found a crusty old guy who owns a ridiculously busy shop, with a loyal following, and asked him to do a pre-purchase inspection. He asked if we were new to RVing, we replied no. He then said, "Well you know well enough to not waste your time or mine, bringing a rig with obvious water damage for me to approve, since I won't". Nobody should EVERY buy a water damaged rig, unless it's stupid cheap, and they are a great DIYer. Water damage is no different than an iceberg. The part you see is ten percent of the problem. The real damage is below the surface, and typically WAY worse that your would ever imagine. Regard the pics. posted by the OP, no way, no how, nope, never. EDIT: Just noticed that the OP was going to buy a ticket and fly to look at this thing. As I may of mentioned, no way, no how, nope, never.
soren 07/13/17 08:13am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best tire for driving Alaskan Highway

Soren, while I don't doubt your past experience, Cherry picking responses to provide an argument or entertainment is kinda, well, very rvnet ish. No one was talking about brodozers, but nice comparison. I also believe you can make it to AK and back without a side arm and some nice un-macho looking baloney skins on the truck, but, umm, I don't know, being prepared for some crappy roads or having a bit tougher tires for when you accidentally tag a sharp rock from one of the countless rock slides ON the highway doesn't seem like a big stretch in feasibility to me. I don't like changing tires anywhere but in my shop. Sounds logical, but in 20K+ miles of actually driving in the Yukon, and AK, I really have had zero tire problems. I always assumed the low grade ST rated, imported, junk trailer tires would get me, but it just didn't happen. Not like the roads were wonderful, I bent two axles on fairly light trailers (24' 4600lb UVW) and did other damage from extreme stone chipping, to broken welds, wiring torn off an axle, etc... Another thing to consider is that the road system generally gets better, straighter, and less like it was "back in the day" with every passing year. Our first trip was nearing two decades ago, and it was far worse than the latest adventure.
soren 07/11/17 05:52pm Truck Campers
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