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 > Your search for posts made by 'soren' found 302 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Electrician says Motor Homes want 220v

So if you had exactly 10 amps flowing on one leg and exactly 10 on the other, there'd be no current flowing on the neutral. See diagram below. So does that mean you could do without the neutral in that case? Nope, don't even think about it. Actually, in THAT case, where the currents are balanced, you COULD remove the neutral and things would still work. :) Until the loads unbalanced, and then bad things would happen! :) ~Rick Yea, an open neutral can make for some truly entertaining troubleshooting. Nothing like turning a table lamp on, watch it glow like a fireball, and see the voltage on that leg spike by 40-50 volts. I had a customer who lost a neutral on the underground feed to his house. The voltage on each leg spiked to upwards of 150+ and all the electronics in the house were fried. The screwed up part is that the underground is owned by the utility, they know the entire neighborhood is full of defective underground splices. They knew that each one would eventually fail and potentially cause significant damage to the customer. They not only refused to address the issue, they lied, and claimed that it wasn't happening. Eventually a line crew showed up, repaired the problem, and told the customer that he was lied to, to avoid paying $7K bill for the damage the electric co. caused.
soren 04/24/18 01:56pm Tech Issues
RE: Transport refused trailer from factory?

Well, every time I end up in the Elkhart area, it seems you can't swing a dead cat without hitting somebody driving for an RV transporter. I've been at a gas station where there were so many class Cs with transporter plates, line up to fuel, that it looked like a parade. I doubt that a transport co. would need more than a few minutes to find another hauler if the story was true, and the issue minor. Either the trailer you are waiting for had a serious QC or safety issue that the transport company decided to pass up on, or your dealer is weaving quite a tale. Please update, once you hear something, this sounds interesting.
soren 04/24/18 01:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: ge produxts be aware

1995Brave, as a builder, I often spent tens of thousands a year on kitchen and laundry appliances. I found that Samsung and Bosch were issue free. Whirlpool and Maytag were typically OK, and LG was a hard NO!. I once scored a pile of new stainless steel over the stove LG microwaves, for less than half price. I put one in my house to see if they were acceptable. A week later I removed it, and took a van load of them back to the store. The manager apologized, and told me, "If I was working that day, I would of never allowed you to leave with that stack of junk. I never sell LG to anybody, if I can help it". I went through 2 Samsung refrigerators in 4 years. Junk! Never own another one. I guess it just reflects the hit or miss nature of the industry anymore? I have bought many of them, with zero problems, and have new one in my own home, with a few years of trouble free service. The other issues is the whole concept of a "luxury" fridge. I refuse to buy into the whole $2500-4000 fridge game. I've bought dozens, and never paid more than about $1200, and that includes typical side by side units in Stainless, with ice and water on the door. I just wonder how many appliances fail since they are needlessly complicated and full of delicate features?
soren 04/24/18 05:55am General RVing Issues
RE: Electrician says Motor Homes want 220v

The saddest part, as an electrician, is that a 30 Amp RV receptacle has "30AMPS 125 VOLTS" molded right into the front of the receptacle. All you have to do is have the ability to read, yet every year "electricians" end up creating huge amounts of damage as they add 30 amp outlets for homeowners, and fry everything from converters to every single appliance and AC in the RV. I just met a guy who had over $6K in damage to his Motorhome, thanks to another "electrician" who should of stuck to flipping burgers, and not pretended to be something he clearly wasn't. This guy was hired by a county park to "fix" a power pedestal at a campsite. If you're not smart enough to read the darn instructions, you sure as heck ain't smart enough to decide that you already know how it works. Especially since the average moron that pulls this stunt grabs the outlet and says to himself, "of course I know how to do this, it's the same thing as the old three wire dryer outlet, and it's 220 volts". At that point the fuse is lit.
soren 04/23/18 05:56pm Tech Issues
RE: Honest Reviews/Opinions Needed

A rig owned by an RV tech. that you know personally would be a strong favorite, as would the brand he owns, IMHO.
soren 04/23/18 05:43pm Full-time RVing
RE: ge produxts be aware

Just wanted to say that all the hate for top loading HE washers is far from universal. I have about five years on a Maytag top loader without the agitator. The thing works flawless, and provides clean, remarkably dry clothes, that end up going into a matching dryer, that also does a great job.
soren 04/23/18 05:41pm General RVing Issues
RE: Gas stations for Class A gassers with space

Actually, my search is TWO FOLD: Gasbuddy map to scroll along my route for the least expensive fuel on that day's route. Takes about 2 minutes to scroll a full day's drive. Choose stations with cheap fuel where I will need it. I know some prefer a particular brand, but over the years I have found that the places with the best prices seem to move the most fuel so it is fresh. Copy and paste address from Gasbuddy in to Googlearth to look at both overhead and street view. Works every time. And, often there is $.30 difference in price per gallon. That is $15-$25 a tank difference. Got other places to go with that $$. By using Gas Buddy and Google apps. I find it common to see a variation of a few cents between stations in a market area. Absent occasional outliers, I have yet to see any place where gas prices "often" vary by $0.30 a gallon. At no point have I ever been trapped into paying that much over market, as there is some other option, nearby. Bottom line, if your gasser is getting less that 10MPG, there is little incentive to travel very far off of your intended path, to save, what is typically a few pennies per gallon, since the time and fuel used to find the "savings" means that it can actually cost more.
soren 04/23/18 06:50am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Towing Car On A Trailer - Weight Limit

The people who like to talk the most often know the least. So, just to satisfy the adults on the forum, why are you even here? You ask legitimate questions, and don't like the answers. What is the point? As for knowing the least, I guess you are talking about me. I've owned two pop-ups, five travel trailers, and two motorhomes, one gas, one diesel. In over two decades I have used them in 49 states, and most of the Canadian Provinces, while traveling at least 200k miles. I've lived full time in a motorhome, and done extensive repairs and renovations to several rigs. If that's your definition of "knowing the least" remember it comes from a person who made it quite clear that you are asking your questions since you don't have a clue as to what you want and need, and why. BTW, NOBODY is here to WIN AN ARGUMENT, and folks continue to answer your posts. There is a reason that seasoned folks are trying to express the fact that trailering a car is, by far, the worst and last option for those that actually know what they are doing.
soren 04/23/18 06:31am Dinghy Towing
RE: USPS Forwarding Problems

I see we are not the only ones with issues. Our post office will only hold for 30 days. If we know we will be gone longer then that I have been forwarding our mail to my sons house. It worked great for 2 years. This year it is all screwed up.mi filled out the paper work when we left. When we cam home I stopped the forward. At that time I started getting my sons mail as well. Went to my post office to complain. He had me fill out a change of address for my son. Things still aren't right. I called customer care service and she told me the local post office gave me wrong forms. She walked through everything and made corrections while on the phone. I have to block a sign in the mail box saying change on file or the jerks will deliver mail when we are gone. Does anyone use any of the forwarding services like Escapees on a temporary basis. If so how does that work. Wow, this dredged up some bad memories. I forgot that a few years ago, when we hit the road, fulltime, I used my son's address as a domicile address. When it came time to move our address to our new sticks and bricks house, it was a mess, with the USPS delivering my son's utility bills to our new home, well after they were due, and other Serious issues. We snowbird now, and forward our mail to Saint Brendan's Isle mail service in Florida, for the winter months. We use their digital scanning and handling system and are thrilled with their competence. They have provided us years of flawless service. When USPS does their job properly, typically our entire snowbird season is pretty trouble free, when it comes to actually receiving first class mail and magazines. Got to keep my fingers crossed on that though, since when the USPS decides to screw it up, they really screw it up...........
soren 04/23/18 06:23am Full-time RVing
RE: Bed cap removing

I recently bought the classic "Pappy" truck. A fifteen year old Chevy half ton, in pristine condition, with low miles. It was owned by a man who simply got too old to use it anymore, and had a set of maintenance records that rival a well maintained corporate jet. It came with an ARE one piece, custom painted, fiberglass bed cover. I had no interest in the cover, and was stunned to find that nobody else in my area did either. I tried Craigslist, and got nothing. I contacted several used cap dealers who refused to take it for free. One even told me that he gets stuck with a handful a year as trade ins, and will pile them up, then crush them up with a backhoe, and load the debris in the dumpster. I eventually found an ARE dealer who took it for free, and commented that he occasionally gets a customer that will pay $1200 for a new one, yet the used ones are hard to give away. I guess the point of all this is that a cover can be pretty handy, but buying a new one piece model may not be the smartest idea. Not to mention that they could be a giant PITA if you plan on removing and reinstalling it regularly.
soren 04/23/18 06:13am Fifth-Wheels
RE: USPS Forwarding Problems

We have been doing seasonal temporary forwards for about five years. Some years it's a flawless process, some years it's a disaster. The process is handled by the USPS computer system, and yelling at your local postmaster is a vast waste of time. They can do little but check that your start/stop and forward info. is correct. One huge misconception is that your local "home" post office forwards your mail. If the system is working properly (and for us it typically is) a piece of mail, addressed to your permanent address, is diverted as soon as it hits the system, it should not travel from the sender to your permanent address, to your forwarding address. One year, in the recent past, we had roughly three weeks prior to Christmas where we received zero forwarded mail. This included everything from a lot of Christmas cards to bills, and other important stuff. I then discovered that it's a vast waste of time to try to do anything but confirm that all the data is correct in the system. Obviously, a lot of my mail hit the trash, but USPS employees will vigorously deny that this is a possibility at all, claiming that it's a crime, and NEVER happens, which is BS. The best defense to all of this it to avoid the post office as much as possible by making everything in your life as paperless as possible. Good luck.
soren 04/22/18 10:10am Full-time RVing
RE: Towing Car On A Trailer - Weight Limit

Odd, to be seeking solid advice, then complaining that you don't like what you read, eh? I didn't complain or say I didn't like anything. I was seeking "solid advice" on how to tow a Subaru Crosstrek, on a trailer with a 35-foot class A motorhome with a gas engine. Not how to flat-tow a car I don't own with a diesel motor I'm not going to buy. But people can keep telling me I should do something that I'm not going to do. At the risk of pointing out the obvious, you missed a few key words in your reply. Your last sentence really should say, " but EXPERIENCED, KNOWLEDGEABLE people keep OFFERING ME QUALITY ADVICE and I'm not going to follow it. Do whatever floats your boat. Understand that there is a price to pay for doing so however. For example, you seem to be totally unaware that there are solid engineering decisions behind having tow ratings on gas A rigs that include a 3500# to 5000# rating with a VERY light hitch weight. It's because they are built on a frame that is significantly shorter than the overall length of the "box" The frame is extended by the coach builder, and often is unable to rigidly support the back of the rig, over time and use. 34' and larger class A rigs are famous for subtle to outrageous sagging in the rear, over time. By limiting the hitch weight, and not allowing things like large cargo trailers and car haulers to be pulled by their products, the builder is insuring that it doesn't literally bent to the point of failure where the extensive joins the factory frame, or cause enough deflection to cause damage and a loss of function, IE, binding slides. TLDR version? Extended frame, gas products are built on light frames that are cobbled together to get the job done. They are given a "towing rating" that makes it clear that they are designed to PULL a load, not TOW it. As in four wheel down, compact car following behind, or on a tow dolly, NOT a car and car trailer. Bottom line when asking for advice on the Subaru, car trailer, and 35' class A gasser? It's real simple, it's not a good idea,period. Which is why you are getting responsible replies like, think about a diesel, (with a massive frame typically built by Freightliner BTW) or find another car that flat tows well. So, If you had a dollar for every time a knowledgeable person gave you good advice, good for you. If you ignore it, well bless your heart. Hope everything goes as well as you think it will.
soren 04/21/18 09:02am Dinghy Towing
RE: Gas stations for Class A gassers with space

The trick is to set a tank level, say down to 1/4 tank, and then stop at the first station that has room for you to pull in. Usually this is an end pump but depending on the stations layout, sometimes we have used an inner pump. If you wait until you are close to empty, not only could you damage your "in tank" fuel pump, but you could also minimize your chances of finding a station to fill up. Flying J and the other major truck stops are usually the most expensive places to refuel while some of the outlying stations may be quite a bit less expensive. We very seldom will fill up at a major truck stop unless we have other things that we need there, that we cannot get elsewhere. I see the claim the FJ is "the most expensive", many times here. On a recent return from snowbird season (FL to PA), I decided to see if I was failing to pay attention to high prices, since I typically refuel at FJ. I used a smartphone app to look ahead at current pricing, several stops down the road, when deciding to fuel at FJ, or find another nearby location that was, according to forum members, going to be "dramatically cheaper". Bottom line, in a 1200 mile trip? I found ONE example of an overpriced FJ. It was alone at an exit, and dozens of miles away from the competition. As for any significant savings at all from nearby competitors, it just didn't exist. Now, I did have the opportunity to head into a town off the exit, deal with the chance of trying to get a 34' Gas class A and toad into a tight old, urban station, and save a few pennies a gallon. Once you calculate the frustration, good chance of failure, and no real savings involved when driving a few miles off the highway in a rig that gets 6-7MPG, it is almost never worth the effort. You may have a totally different experience, but for me, I just don't see the big payday, avoiding FJ, or most other large, easily accessible highway interchange stations.
soren 04/21/18 08:39am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Towing Car On A Trailer - Weight Limit

I wish I had a dollar for every time some poster told me I should get a diesel motor or a car that I can flat-tow. I wish I had another dollar for every time I thought to myself if money was no object I probably would do that. If I had all those dollars money would probably not be an object for me. Odd, to be seeking solid advice, then complaining that you don't like what you read, eh? You haven't bought a motorhome yet, so there is no reason that you are forced to buy a gas one. In any price range, the motor is your choice. You can buy an excellent, high quality diesel in a used Newmar, or similar product, for less that a POS new gasser from the mega-manufacturers will cost. Doesn't matter if you are spending $35K or $200k, deciding what powers your motorhome is your choice, and you are only limited by your ability and knowledge as you shop for one. You can also get rid of the Subaru and replace it with something that flat tows, fairly easily. IF you want to plague yourself with an overweight trailer on a gasser that can't really handle the job, that's your choice. There are lots of compelling reasons to avoid doing so, however.
soren 04/20/18 10:17am Dinghy Towing
RE: Towing Car On A Trailer - Weight Limit

Having said all that, in my opinion hauling a car on a trailer is the least desirable of all the possible options for towing a car. Driving is no problem, with a little experience backing is not that hard. I've maneuvered a 22 foot flatbed trailer with a 40 foot box truck and it was much easier than I would have thought. The main issue is that when you are parked and unloaded you have an extra 1500 pound vehicle 21 feet long and 8 feet wide that can't move on it's own. It's all up to you, but if I were in your shoes I'd ditch the Crosstrek and find something you can tow 4-down. BEST advice on this thread, by far. Bottom line, as a class A owner with a lot of miles and years of RVing, there is now way, no how, that I would ever plague myself with a car trailer. If you can't tow your Subaru with four wheels down, find something that you can. A car trailer will be nothing but a giant PITA, and don't try to convince yourself otherwise.
soren 04/19/18 05:07pm Dinghy Towing
RE: ge produxts be aware

1995Brave, as a builder, I often spent tens of thousands a year on kitchen and laundry appliances. I found that Samsung and Bosch were issue free. Whirlpool and Maytag were typically OK, and LG was a hard NO!. I once scored a pile of new stainless steel over the stove LG microwaves, for less than half price. I put one in my house to see if they were acceptable. A week later I removed it, and took a van load of them back to the store. The manager apologized, and told me, "If I was working that day, I would of never allowed you to leave with that stack of junk. I never sell LG to anybody, if I can help it".
soren 04/19/18 05:39am General RVing Issues
RE: any experience at Wilderness Camp at Disney???

I would actually like to see them expand the fort. Lots of undeveloped land around the lake. I agree, they could expand it by 50% and still get close to keeping the place fully booked. OTOH, we just spent an entire boat ride, from FW to the Magic Kingdom, talking to a first mate. She was a lifer, who started in the eighties. She had a lot of interesting info. about the history of the region, and claimed that there is a lot of Disney property locked up in preservation agreements, including waterfront. The other interesting observation about FW, is that there has been very little effort to upgrade much of anything in the last few decades. Lots of high quality maintenance, and modest upgrading of things like bath houses, but no real drive to capture a lot of missed opportunities. IMHO, a family oriented casual restaurant, an ice cream shop and a coffee cafe would all be extremely popular, and profitable. There has to be a pretty compelling reason that a corporation like KOA makes every effort to monetize every single opportunity (cafe, bike rental, zip-line, ice cream parlor, etc....) in their premium properties, yet Disney doesn't lift a finger, when it comes to lost potential. It would suck, but seeing an announcement that Disney is planning to close the Fort, in the future, wouldn't surprise me in the least.
soren 04/19/18 05:11am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: any experience at Wilderness Camp at Disney???

Interesting but I can't imagine FW is losing money at those rates. There is a good chance that this property is one of the most profitable RV resorts in N.A. To a global corporate titan,like Disney, that is may not be a particularly relevant metric. The issue is "lost opportunity cost". As in, if this property was bulldozed, what could this patch of dirt be doing for the bottom line? No different than being the landlord of a small, paid off, multi-unit apartment rental. It's zoned commercial and located on the main street of a small town. Not a particularly desirable building, and your tenants aren't cream of the crop either, since better tenants want nicer places to live. It's putting a grand or two in your pocket on a good month. Sadly, When a sewer pipe breaks, or the roof is shot, it many be costing you money for a while. You had a vulture investor offer you $250K in cash for it the other day. OTOH, if you borrow $300K from your bank, demo the old apartment building, and put a new car wash up, you are in a whole other game. Your monthly take doubled, the place is new and reasonably trouble free, and it's worth $850K as a profitable business. By keeping the apartments, you are missing the opportunity to double your income, and/or sell it as a highly profitable car wash and put an additional $350K in your pocket. Doesn't matter if you are playing with a few hundred thousand, or are the biggest mega-corp in the business, the concept is the same. As a decades long guest, I'm pretty safe in guessing that Fort Wilderness is not the "highest and best use" of their prime waterfront.
soren 04/18/18 09:30am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Extra Tires to the Yukon?

AlaskaShooter, interesting post. One surprising thing I learned, after spending time at the Alcan museum in downtown Dawson's Creek, is that the idea the the US "gave" the highway to Canada at the end of the war, is a myth. Technically they did, but they charged them $108 million for air fields, telephone systems, and other improvements. I get the feeling that the Canadians were not too thrilled about it, as they handed over nearly a billion and a half, in today's dollars, for a poorly built dirt trail. Apparently funding is an ongoing issue, as the US seems unwilling to continue funding for the Shakwak agreement, that rebuilt and maintained the highway from Haines Juction to the AK. border for the last few decades. Ironic that the states have a far greater need for that section than Canada does, but the Yukon government had to hire American lobbyists in an attempt to get paid.
soren 04/18/18 09:00am RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: any experience at Wilderness Camp at Disney???

Too expensive, does NOT live up to the hype Disney runs perhaps the most successful entertainment enterprise on the planet. They own what is regarded as one of the best RV parks in North America. It is 100% full, for much of the year. For ever potential client with your attitude, there are several that are disappointed that they failed to even get in. The fact that anybody is not impressed with Fort Wilderness, is of little concern to them. The average family of four now spends $7500 for a five day Disney vacation. Obviously, that figure would cause many here to faint, as many are tighter than a frog's butt, and have moths flying out of their wallets when they get cracked open, every few months. Here on the forum there is a long history of those that bitterly whine that FW is a "rip-off" since it's fifty bucks more that the local KOA. The same people who drop over $100 per person a day,for park tickets, are horrified that a high end RV resort on the property isn't as cheap as the one ten miles away in Kissimmee. (in one of the highest crime cities, in one of the highest crime states, BTW) Having been a loyal customer at FW for the last two decades, I occasionally wonder when Disney leadership is going to pull the plug on the whole place. It's located on prime property, and I doubt it generates the return of other high end lodging located on the lake. It's a valid concern, with the long abandoned water park, immediately adjacent, being replaced with a huge timeshare facility. I can see the day when some executive asks, " If Fort wilderness brings such a poor ROI, and our internal data shows that our camping guests spend much less on their vacation experience as those who stay in our high end properties, why are we wasting prime property on them?"
soren 04/18/18 05:31am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
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