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 > Your search for posts made by 'trailertraveler' found 169 matches.

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RE: RVing versus hotels for a trip out west fromVA

Read this thread for a lot of suggestions of places to see in New Mexico.
trailertraveler 03/04/15 02:14pm Roads and Routes
RE: Roads within Yellowstone okay for towing travel trailer

...We'll be coming in from the north and leaving to the south. We pull a 29' travel trailer with our Suburban, what are acceptable roads for pulling a travel trailer within Yellowstone? Do we need to avoid some?...As stated, the roads in Yellostone are in two loops. Here is a map of the park roads. Speed limit in the park is 45MPH or less. All of the roads are travelled daily by all types and sizes of RV. You will go up and down several times and likely cross the continental divide more than once as you tour the park. In my opinion, the road from Tower to Canyon over Dunraven Pass (8859') has the steepest grades. It is a beautiful drive and one that you will want to take during your visit. If you do it without the RV, you can drive the Chittendon Road to a parking lot most of the way up to the Fire Lookout at the top of Mount Washburn. From the North Entrance to Fishing Bridge it is 4 miles shorter to through Norris than Tower and I don't think the grades are as steep.
trailertraveler 03/04/15 05:47am Roads and Routes
RE: Change Residency but keep Vacation Home?

...retirement (at age 60 or 62 for me, 62 or 64 for her) and expect to full time for a couple of years...If you really are only going to fulltime for a couple of years, where do you plan to settle after that? In my opinion, you need to figure in the cost of changing everything over and then again after a couple of years. Things like wills need to be in the state that you want them probated in. If you are going to retire before you are eligible for Medicare and do not have employer provided health insurance, you will need to make sure that you can get coverage that will let you travel. Right now, I think it is still difficult to get health insurance that travels well for those under medicare age in South Dakota. While many focus on the state income tax, there are states that give substantial tax breaks to retirees/seniors. Many states do not tax Social Security. Some like Pennsylvania do not tax traditional IRA distributions. Others like NJ give an exemption of a substantial amount (NJ is $20K at age 62 or above). If you will have a pension, some states allow you to reclaim your contributions in the first 3 years rather than a little at a time over 30+ years. I don't think anyone can really tell you what will work best for you. You need to do the research and decide based on the best information that you can get that applies to all your needs.
trailertraveler 03/03/15 10:09am Full-time RVing
RE: See the USA with our Chevorlet

Here is a list of links to places in Utah that we have visited and enjoyed. Scenic Byways & Backways (not all recommended for travel in the RV): UT-12 Scenic Byway Scenic Backways off UT-12 Calf Creek Falls Hells Backbone Burr Trail Fishlake Scenic Byway Kane Creek Road UT-261 (the Moki Dugway) Flaming Gorge Scenic Byway Potash Lower Colorado Byway Upper Colorado River UT-128 Scenic Byway Attractions: Goosenecks State Park Hovenweep National Monument Natural Bridges National Monument Bluff Fort South Fork of Mule Canyon and House on Fire Cedar Breaks National Monument Sago Canyon Coral Pink Sand Dunes State Park Goblin Valley State Park Escalante Petrified Forest State Park Kodachrome Basin State Park Anasazi State Park Dead Horse Point State Park The Valley of The Gods Edge of the Cedars State Park Blanding Dinosaur Museum Utah Field House State Park Dinosaur National Monument Monument Valley Arches National Park Canyonlands National Park Needles District Newspaper Rock Capitol Reef National Park Bryce Canyon National Park Zion National Park
trailertraveler 03/03/15 05:27am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Suggestions for trip to Grand Canyon & Arches?

Here are some links to places to see. Moab area: Kane Creek Road Potash Lower Colorado Byway Upper Colorado River UT-128 Scenic Byway Sago Canyon Dead Horse Point State Park Arches National Park Canyonlands National Park Needles District Newspaper Rock Flagstaff Area: Sunset Crater National Monument Wupatki National Monument Walnut Canyon National Monument South of Flagstaff in Sedona/Cottonwood/Camp Verde: Montezuma Castle and Montezuma Well National Monuments Tuzigoot National Monument Palatki and Honaki Ruins V-Bar-V Heritage Site Verde Canyon Railroad Fort Verde State Park Cathedral Rock Gold King Mine Jerome State Historic Park the town of Jerome the town of Sedona Going East on I-40 from Flagstaff are Homolovi Ruins State Park near Winslow where you can stand on the corner. Meteor Crater and Petrified Forest National Park are not far from the New Mexico Border. If you head Northeast from the Grand Canyon there is a lot to see in the Monument Valley/Bluff/Blanding Area: Monument Valley UT-261 the Moki Dugway Goosenecks State Park Hovenweep National Monument Natural Bridges National Monument Bluff Fort South Fork of Mule Canyon and House on Fire The Valley of The Gods Edge of the Cedars State Park Dinosaur Museum In Nebraska, Fort Kearney is worth a visit in my opinion. There is also the Great Platte River Road Museum on I-80.
trailertraveler 03/02/15 06:06pm Roads and Routes
RE: Annual cost to fulltime

Something I do not see on the lists is the cost to replace the current RV (motorized with toad or truck and trailer). Is this because people do not plan to full time long enough to have to replace their rig?What people spend and what income they have is not necessarily the same. If you pay close attention to an individual's posts over time on this and other RV forums and look at things like the type of RV and other toys that they have, it may seem that they are spending well below their means so that replacing the RV is not that big an issue. Another benefit of not spending as much as you can possibly afford is that you will have what you didn't spend to deal with the sooner or later inevitable major breakdown, illness, injury or accident and have more financial reserves to get through the crisis. Given the inherent depreciation of all vehicles including RVs, we decided to base our RV purchase budget on what we could afford to lose the same as we did when we invested in individual stocks in the market. We bought a trailer that many would consider a weekend/vacation model with a floorplan we liked in 2007. We traveled cross country East/West and North/South each year towing it over 60,000 miles. We try hard to avoid extreme heat and cold. In 2013, we traded that trailer for a new one. The investment income on what we did not spend on a Diesel Pusher or New Horizons etc, 5th wheel was more than enough to cover the cost of the new trailer and we still have the initial principal earning income for the next replacement or an emergency. Everyone needs to decide what will work for them not what someone else has done or thinks is best.
trailertraveler 03/02/15 05:08pm Full-time RVing
RE: New Mexico

Can't recommend campgrounds in the SW part, that is still on my to do list. My last trip was to the SE quarter of the state, staying in Ft Sumner and Roswell, too long ago to verify the parks are still open or under the same management.Sumner Lake State Park, Bottomless Lake State Park near Roswell and Brantley Lake State Park near Carlsbad all have nice campgrounds and all have some electric sites.
trailertraveler 03/02/15 05:52am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Kansas to Yellowstone

Even thought of trying out Bear Tooth Pass as a day trip(probably not pulling the PUP).If you are staying in Cody, the Chief Joseph Scenic Byway and Beartooth Highway make a great day trip, in my opinion. Red Lodge makes a nice stop for a break or something to eat.
trailertraveler 03/01/15 11:22am Roads and Routes
RE: Forts visited or worth visiting

Old Fort Jackson Fort Moultre Fort Lamar Fort Union National Monument Bluff Fort Fort Verde Fort Clinch Fort Cooper (not much restored yet, but nice reenactment with cannon firing and members of the Seminole tribe) Fort Mott Fort Matanzas Fort Frederica Fort Mifflin Bent's Old Fort
trailertraveler 02/28/15 03:57pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: New Mexico

Warning! The last time we were there the access road to Chaco Canyon NHS would beat an RV to death. They try to grade it, but after the slightest rain it goes bad bad bad in a hurry. We took just the truck...There are a number of places on the list I provided that are not that RV friendly. For example, the turquoise trail scenic byway is OK to drive, but the towns like Madrid don't have many places to park a big rig. The Geronimo Trail has some low clearance bridges. The road to the Christ in the Desert Monastery is 13 miles of gravel/dirt sometimes barely two lane Forest Service Road. The websites usually have information on directions and road conditions. Google earth can also be your friend in checking grades, road surface type, road width, etc. If there is not a campground with sites large enough to accomodate us, we do not try to take the RV there. We generally do not try to stop to sight see while towing. If there is something to see, we will stop for the night and sight see in the tow vehicle.
trailertraveler 02/28/15 09:40am RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Kansas to Yellowstone

...I heard the Big Horn mountains can be steep. Any particular route through there or through the Black Hills?...Where are you staying in Yellowstone? From West Yellowstone, US-191 will take you to I-90 without any serious mountain driving. Us-89 will take you from the North entrance of the park to I-90 without any serious mountain driving. If you are going out the East entrance to visit Cody, WY-120, MT-72, US-310 will take you to I-90 without any serious mountain driving. US-16 is the more scenic route, but does have grades in the 6-7% range. If you do not take US-16, I-90 will take you close to the Little Bighorn Battlefield which if you have the time is worth a visit in my opinion. As is Devils Tower.
trailertraveler 02/28/15 07:36am Roads and Routes
RE: Annual cost to fulltime

Here are a couple of more links to websites where folks post their budgets/yearly expenditures: Five Years of Expenses 2014 Expense Report Your grocery bill will be about the same, your dining out will be about the same, your hobbies, etc. all about the same. Once again, everyone's experience will be a little different. We find that we spend more on these categories when travelling exploring new places compared to periods of longer term stays in familiar areas. When in new places short term and especially in some of the more rural or remote locations, we are not familiar with the grocery stores. There may not even be a choice and no major chain store. When at our winter and summer locations, we can use Sam's, Costco, etc. more because we can split the big bulk items that we don't have space for when travelling with folks we know. We have on occasion all chipped in and bought a side of beef. When we are at our winter and summer locations, we rarely dine out other than special occasions like birthday/anniversary. During the 6 months that we travel extensively to see the country; we will often dine out on a travel day, especially if there is a place within walking distance. Part of the experience of visiting a new location for us is sampling the local cuisine. We will often stop for lunch or an early dinner when out exploring for the day. Not uncommon for us to dine out once or more a week when travelling compared to less than once a month when sitting. As for hobbies, we both like to fish and I hunt. A combination hunting and fishing license for our state of domicile which is where we spend the winter and summer is $60 for the whole year. Short term licenses are, in my opinion, not all that expensive; but they can add up.
trailertraveler 02/28/15 05:48am Full-time RVing
RE: New Mexico

As usual, DesertHawk has provided lots of great information complete with great photos. This is the list of places that we have visited and enjoyed during our visits to New Mexico. Fort Union National Monument, Pecos National Historic Site, Bandelier National Monument, Petroglyph National Monument, El Malpais National Monument, El Moro National Monument, Aztec Ruins National Monument, Salinas Pueblos National Monument, White Sands National Monument, Tent Rocks National Monument, Acoma Sky City, Pueblo Cultural Center, Ice Cave and Bandera Volcano, The Very Large Array, The Blue Hole, Cumbres & Toltec Railroad, Salmon Ruins, Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Rio Grande River Gorge, Kit Carson Home & Museum in Taos, Mining Museum, Tucumcari, Christ in the Desert Monastery, Carlsbad Caverns National Park, Turquoise Trail, Chaco Cultural Historical Park, Mimbres Museum, Geronimo Springs Museum, Old Mesilla, Geronimo Trail, Pinos Altos, Valley of Fires, Three Rivers Petroglyph Site, Oliver Lee Memorial State Park, New Mexico Museum of Space History, Rockhound State Park, City of Rocks State Park, Poncho Villa State Park, Rio Grande Del Norte National Monument, Museum Hill in Santa Fe, Canyon Road Galleries in Santa Fe, Ghost Ranch, Smokey Bear Historic Park
trailertraveler 02/27/15 06:31pm RV Parks, Campgrounds and Attractions
RE: Route stops between Albuquerque & Flagstaff?

There are more areas such as the vast array down a little further out of soccoro, there is Pie Town along the same route and then you can go north to the Malapais lava flow...The painted desert with just a cursory view will take several hours and then you will either back track or take 2 lane roads back to I40 to get on trac again...New Mexico has many interesting places to visit. We have spent over 8 months over the course of several years traveling throughout the state. Ten days will only let you see a very small part of what is available. The Very Large Array(VLA) is worth visiting. It has a nice visitor center and self-guided walking tour. However, it is 126 miles from Albuquerque. Pie Town does have an annual festival, but when we have gone through it really wasn't much different than many of the other semi ghost towns in rural New Mexico except for the focus on pie. A loop to include the VLA, Pie Town and El Malpais National Monument and rejoin I-40 at Grants is 262 miles versus 72 miles from Albuquerque to Grants via I-40. From Grants you can visit the El Malpais Lava Flows, Inscription Rock at El Moro National Monument, and the Ice Cave and Bandera Volcano in a one day loop. We found the mining museum in Grants, which has a replica of a uranium mine, to be interesting. Some of the campgrounds in Grants have lava flows all around them. Going Westbound on I-40, if you take exit 311, you will be at the Painted Desert Visitor Center of Petrified Forest National Park. If you follow Petrified Forest Road, it will take you through the Park to the South Entrance on US-180. US-180 West will take you back to I-40 West at Exit 285 in Holbrook.
trailertraveler 02/27/15 12:30pm Roads and Routes
RE: Route stops between Albuquerque & Flagstaff?

How much driving do you want to do? Albuquerque to Flagstaff is 323 miles. The route described through Chama, Durango, Cortez and Page is 755 miles. There is more to see along this route than was mentioned. The drive from Abiquiu to the Christ in the Desert Monastery is very scenic. Tent Rocks National Monument and the drive up to the Veterens Memorial Overlook is worth visiting in my opinion. Bandelier National Monument is West of Santa Fe. The Turquoise Trail Scenic Byway between Albuquerque and Santa Fe takes you through the old mining towns of Madrid (where the movie "Wild Hogs" was filmed) and Cerrilos. The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad is in Chama. Just to the North of this route from Cortez to Page is the Monument Valley and Bluff area with the Monument Valley Tribal Park, UT-261 the Moki Dugway Scenic Backway, Goosenecks State Park, Hovenweep National Monument, Natural Bridges National Monument, Bluff Fort, South Fork of Mule Canyon and House on Fire, and The Valley of The Gods. We have spent a lot more than ten days in these areas and still not seen it all.
trailertraveler 02/27/15 08:55am Roads and Routes
RE: Annual cost to fulltime

For those like my wife and I that are planning ahead for a decent retirement, this information can help us plan. So we have an idea of what it will cost us the first year when we want to see the country.We travel twice a year and sit on a property we own in between. Here's some cost for the travel part. In 2013 we spent 50 days traveling through New Mexico. Distance from site to site was 1196 miles (does not include in and around travel). No stays were longer than a week. RV sites cost = $1015.93; All fuel = $949.35; Groceries for two = $697.10; Dining Out = $361.43. That comes out to $60.48/day. In 2013, we spent 64 days in Florida and Georgia. We had two weeks at $5/night and a monthly stay. Distance from site to site was 882 miles. RV sites cost = $1056; All fuel = $579.32; Groceries for two = $972.36; Dining Out = $319.25. That comes out to $45.74/day. In 2014, We spent 58 days in New Mexico. Several weekly stays. Distance from site to site was 702 miles. RV sites cost = $1448.34; All fuel = $798.65; Groceries for two = $1001.80; Dining Out = $262.98. That comes out to $60.55/day. In 2014, we traveled through Florida, Alabama and Mississippi for 59 days. No stays longer than a week. Distance from site to site was 1473 miles. RV sites cost = $1591.27; All fuel = $1041055; Groceries for two = $991.06; Dining Out = $493.34. That comes out to $69.75/day. So if you extrapolate those travel costs for a whole year, it would cost us between $16,695 and $25,458/year. Hope this is somewhat like what you are looking for.
trailertraveler 02/27/15 06:56am Full-time RVing
RE: Route stops between Albuquerque & Flagstaff?

I think you will definitely have to make some choices as there are lots of them. In Albuquerque there is Petroglyph National Monument, the Pueblo Cultural Center, and the Turquoise Trail. In and near Grants are the Mining Museum, El Malpais National Monument, El Moro National Monument, and the Ice Cave and Bandera Volcano. Acoma Sky City is between Grants and Gallup. Meteor Crater and Petrified Forest National Park are not far over the Arizona border. Homolovi Ruins State Park is near Winslow where you can stand on the corner. In the Flagstaff area are Sunset Crater National Monument, Wupatki National Monument and Walnut Canyon National Monument. In the Sedona/Cottonwood/Camp Verde area are Montezuma Castle and Montezuma Well National Monuments, Tuzigoot National Monument, Palatki and Honaki Ruins, the V-Bar-V Heritage Site, the Verde Canyon Railroad, Fort Verde State Park, Cathedral Rock, the Gold King Mine, Jerome State Historic Park and the town of Jerome.
trailertraveler 02/26/15 07:28pm Roads and Routes
RE: Annual cost to fulltime

I think one needs to define for themselves, what they mean by fulltiming in an RV. Does your definition include workamping/volunteering X number of hours/week for X weeks, month(s) or a season in return for an RV site to keep costs down or working at Amazon, gate guarding or the sugar beet harvest part of the year to earn enough to travel the rest of the year? Do you just want to live in an RV or actually travel in one? How much and where do you want to travel? Do you want to just move from a warm winter location to a cooler summer location taking advantage of long term rates and places like the BLM LTVAs? Do you want to travel mostly from one membership park to another? Do you want to mostly boondock? Two of the more controllable costs are fuel and camping fees. Fuel cost is pretty simply to manage. Don’t drive and you won’t need fuel. Which brings me back to the question of what do you want/plan to do in your RV, sit in a few places or travel and see the country? Many RVs get about 10MPG. So, using that and $3.00/Gal, every 1000 miles will cost $300 in fuel. Fuel prices can vary a fair amount from state to state due to the fuel taxes. Fuel prices can also fluctuate widely by time of year and other market factors. Discussions of yearly camping costs usually result in widely varying costs ranging from a few dollars/night to $20-30/night. You need to understand just how those costs were achieved and the extra costs that might be incurred but not counted in the calculation of nightly costs. The extremely low costs often result from workamping that includes a free site; volunteering that includes a free site; staying primarily in membership parks such as Thousand Trails; extensive dry camping in Forest Service, BLM or other public campgrounds and boondocking. If one moves once a month and can get a rate of $250/month that is $3,000/year. If one were to stay less than a month and get a weekly rate of $100 that is $5,200/year. A nightly rate of $20 comes to $7,300/year. In my experience those are fairly low rates for commercial and public campgrounds. We have found that BLM, Forest Service and Corps of Engineers campgrounds often offer sites with electric service at nightly costs between $3.00-13.00 with the Senior Pass. However, they rarely offer weekly or monthly rates and often have stay limits of 14-21 days. Travelling the U.S. highways, we have found city parks (even some with hookups) that allow overnights for free or a very reasonable cost. However, they also often have stay limits, sometimes as short as a day or two. So you save on nightly fees, but use fuel to get to the next location. When travelling from destination to destination, Walmarts, truck stops and other areas that allow overnight stays can save a considerable amount on camping fees. Without major changes in lifestyle, you will likely spend about the same on most things as you do now. What you will spend fulltiming in an RV will depend a lot on you and what you want to do.
trailertraveler 02/26/15 11:50am Full-time RVing
RE: Il to Yellowstone

text deleted on edit. Sorry I miss read the question and gave an inappropriate response.
trailertraveler 02/26/15 06:01am Roads and Routes
RE: High Level Q: TT vs FW for Full-timing?

...As a side benefit the cheaper, lighter weight rig will be cheaper to register and insure, year after year too...Another benefit of not spending as much as you can possibly afford is that you will have what you didn't spend to deal with the sooner or later inevitable major breakdown, illness, injury or accident and have more financial reserves to get through the crisis. Given the inherent depreciation of all vehicles including RVs, we decided to base our RV purchase budget on what we could afford to lose the same as we did when we invested in individual stocks in the market. We bought a trailer that many would consider a weekend/vacation model with a floorplan we liked in 2007. We traveled cross country East/West and North/South each year towing it over 60,000 miles. We try hard to avoid extreme heat and cold. In 2013, we traded that trailer for a new one. The investment income on what we did not spend on a Diesel Pusher or New Horizons etc, 5th wheel was more than enough to cover the cost of the new trailer and we still have the initial principal earning income for the next replacement or an emergency. Everyone needs to find what will work for them not what someone else has done or thinks is best.
trailertraveler 02/21/15 06:28am Full-time RVing
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