RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'transamz9' found 592 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 30  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: 2012 GMC tranny issues

We have a 2007 at work that had done this. One time a transmission was put in and another time the TPS was replaced.
transamz9 01/30/15 03:13pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

^^^^^THAT WAS AWESOME!!!!!..Over 200 mph, AGAINST the wind.!!!!....^^^ :B Awesome? Maybe.....I think it's nuts. There are idiots like me who lack the common sense and self discipline to keep that power bottled up. So far so good, I have resisted any temptation to look at anything but an SUV for our next car. That makes two of us, thus the reason I'll never own one, (other than price:))..I couldn't resist the temptation to run just about anything that would be on the road...I never grew up and am one of those idiots myself....ask my wife:B You guys could always get yourself an old Willys Jeep....... Willys
transamz9 01/29/15 04:34am Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

An even bigger difference is in the Hemi 6.4 gasoline engine based on application: Challenger - 485 hp with 475 ft lbs Pickup - 410 hp with 429 ft lbs Chassis Cab - 367 hp with 429 ft lbs I'm pretty sure everyone would love to but their foot to the floor of the Challenger and leave it there... LOL! It would definitely be fun........until you had to make a curve. We have an '06 F550 with 4.88's that stays hooked to our Goose neck and when you drive it loaded it's foot to the floor on the interstate. Now this is with a .71 OD instead of .6X in the Aisin. I believe our F550 tops out at 83. LOL! I'd prefer to put my foot to the floor in a Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, at 707HP and 650lb-ft of TQ..it would be fun, AND I understand the suspension is up to taking corners at a faster speed than one might think:) .........and it would literally blow the doors off anything mentioned above:B Well.....blowing the doors off is a little far fetched.......I mean the doors are mounted pretty solid on the before mentioned vehicles.:B OK, so I embellished:B Would still like to take that bad boy for a ride:) For your dreaming pleasures.... Hellcat Foot Through the throttle body
transamz9 01/28/15 07:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

I don't quite understand why max hp and max tq are both achieved at different rpm ? and with that which of the 2 rpm's should I be using to get the most out of an engine when climbing or accelerating with a heavy load? Max horsepower will put the most torque to the rear wheels. It kind of depends how you look at this question. Say you start climbing a hill with a big trailer. As the grade increases you floor it and your transmission drops two gears and the engine is running at near the rpm where it makes maximum power. The hill is long and getting steeper, you keep your foot to the floor but the engine continues to loose rpm; as it slows it continues to increase the torque to the rear wheels until it either meets the demand of the hill or the rpm drops to where the e.engine is making maximum torque. If the hill still demands more torque another downsjit is required and the engine increases its rpm again so it can start the cycle over again. Anyway you will pull the hill the fastest in the gear that keeps your engine revved close to the rpm where maximum HP is achieved but in each gear the rpm where the engine makes the most torque is always the rpm where the engine will pull the hardest in that gear. True. However, if I'm rolling along at 65mph in my '03 Cummins powered Ram with it's flat torque curve in O/D at 2k rpm towing our 5th wheel and along comes a 3% hill that's too steep to maintain speed in O/D, if I let it downshift to direct to run 2800rpm, I can increase torque to the rear axle from 1301ft/lbs to 1886ft/lbs and maintain speed. Same 460ft/lbs of flywheel torque but I went from 175hp to 245hp. With my 5.4L F250, downshifts are common. With it's less flat torque curve, it might make less flywheel torque at 3k rpm or 5k rpm than at it's 3800rpm peak but through gear reduction/torque multiplication, I'll be putting much more torque to the rear axle at 4500rpm than at 3800rpm running the same road speed. More HP means more torque to the rear wheels. I basically agree with what you're saying. Like you described for the Ram, here is a hypothetical scenario using some real numbers for a Ford. Obviously there are details ommitted; like driveline inefficiencies and wind redistance to keep it simple. Say a Ford 1 ton hits a steep hill pulling a trailer at 64 mph. The weight of the truck/trailer and slope of the hill determine that a torque of 3431 lb ft is necessary on the rear axle to pull the load up the hill. You push your foot to the floor and the transmission downshifts two gears. At this point the engine is revving 2900 rpm, your in 4th gear and still traveling 64 mph. At 2900 rpm the Powerstroke makes its maximum power of 400 horsepower. So it is making 400 x 5252/2900 = 724 lb ft of torque at the crankshaft. Multiplying this through the 4th gear ratio of 1.15:1 and the final drive ratio of 3.73 we can calculate the torque on the rear axle to be 3107 lb ft. The truck starts to slow down. Now if you chose to manually select 4th gear so the transmission could not downshift, the engine would continue to slow down all the way to 1700 rpm where the Powetstroke makes its maximum torque value of 800 lb ft. At that point the required rear axle torque to get the trailer up the hill of 3431 is just met. So you would be able to pull the load up the hill in 4th gear at 1700 engine rpm (which is the engines maximum torque rpm) at a speed of 37 mph. So now back up to where the truck begins slowing down from 64 mph. As soon as the engine rpm drops to 2194 rpm you manually shift the transmission to 3rd gear. The engine revs to 2900 rpm and you are going 48 mph. At this engine rpm the crankshaft torque is 724 lb ft. Running that torque through the third gear ratio of 1.52 and the rear axle ratio of 3.73 the engine and transmission are able to deliver 4100 lb ft of torque. The truck would start to accelerate up the hill in 3rd gear until the crankshaft torque drops to 605 lb ft of torque. We can only guess the rpm the engine could rev to.... maybe 3200 rpm and 53 mph. So running in 4th gear at max torque you could climb the hill at 37 mph and in 3rd gear revving the engine high you could pull the hill at about 53 mph. Which goes back to higher HP puts more torque to the drive wheels and pulls the grade faster. I saw this many times with my Cummins powered Rams. I like this video of a 6.7L PSD towing 13k? lbs up a long grade. Far more realistic than so many claims made here. I saw 2900rpm a lot with my last two Cummins powered Rams. Peak horsepower numbers do matter when you find yourself maxed out on a grade. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_1ZefREs0Y What claims are you referring to that's not realistic?
transamz9 01/28/15 07:36pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

An even bigger difference is in the Hemi 6.4 gasoline engine based on application: Challenger - 485 hp with 475 ft lbs Pickup - 410 hp with 429 ft lbs Chassis Cab - 367 hp with 429 ft lbs I'm pretty sure everyone would love to but their foot to the floor of the Challenger and leave it there... LOL! It would definitely be fun........until you had to make a curve. We have an '06 F550 with 4.88's that stays hooked to our Goose neck and when you drive it loaded it's foot to the floor on the interstate. Now this is with a .71 OD instead of .6X in the Aisin. I believe our F550 tops out at 83. LOL! I'd prefer to put my foot to the floor in a Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat, at 707HP and 650lb-ft of TQ..it would be fun, AND I understand the suspension is up to taking corners at a faster speed than one might think:) .........and it would literally blow the doors off anything mentioned above:B Well.....blowing the doors off is a little far fetched.......I mean the doors are mounted pretty solid on the before mentioned vehicles.:B
transamz9 01/28/15 02:19pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

An even bigger difference is in the Hemi 6.4 gasoline engine based on application: Challenger - 485 hp with 475 ft lbs Pickup - 410 hp with 429 ft lbs Chassis Cab - 367 hp with 429 ft lbs I'm pretty sure everyone would love to but their foot to the floor of the Challenger and leave it there... LOL! It would definitely be fun........until you had to make a curve. We have an '06 F550 with 4.88's that stays hooked to our Goose neck and when you drive it loaded it's foot to the floor on the interstate. Now this is with a .71 OD instead of .6X in the Aisin. I believe our F550 tops out at 83. LOL!
transamz9 01/28/15 01:00pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

There are so many posts on this thread that I don't know who said the following: 'HP goes up, duty cycle goes down'. But it does make some sense to me. Case in point, the Ford 6 liter PSD. Without getting into yet another negative Ford 6 liter thread, I've wondered a few things about Ford's version of this, what I believe was an International engine design. Didn't IH also use this engine in their medium duty trucks, but much detuned from the version Ford was using ? Wasn't the IH version pretty reliable in it's less tuned, less HP version than the Ford 6 liter ? The question I ask, is did Ford hop up the base IH engine, because Ford was involved in a diesel HP war with GM and Dodge ? You know the old saying of..' for ever action there is an equal and opposite reaction.' This is of course, Newton's third law of motion in physics. As a result of the action of Ford souping up the IH engine...did the Ford 6 liter PSD...experience an equal and opposite reaction...in that the duty cycle went down...compared to the IH ? Was there too much additional stress on the Ford version of the 6 liter PSD....through souping up...more so than what this engine was originally designed to handle ? Furthermore to reinforce this point....was the Ford version of the IH engine...namely the Ford 6 liter PSD...duty cycle rated, by Ford, at around 250,000 miles...compared to the Dodge Cummins engine duty cycle, rated at 350,000 miles ? In other words...'HP goes up, duty cycle goes down'. I dunno. I'm not a Mechanical Engineer, just a curious regular guy who is for the most part so baffled by things mechanical, that I have trouble finding the hood latch on my son's Jeep. :B The tunes they are putting on the pickups are definitely for lighter duty cycles. Look at the specifications for the same engines put into the chassis cabs to see the difference. My 2015 Ram 5500 with Cummins and Aisin has a 325 hp and 750 ft lb rating verses the 2015 Ram 3500 pickup with same engine and transmission at 385 hp and 865 ft lb rating. Not really, your truck is designed to be worked much harder and last just as long.
transamz9 01/28/15 12:35pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

... duty-cycle (not miles but percentage of time running at or near max power output. Asked about this earlier. Just what do people mean by duty-cycle? You've given two interpretations above. I've read articles referencing "medium-duty" trucks where all they talk about is their GVWR. So when the O.P says "as HP goes up, Duty cycle goes down", exactly what is meant? The Duty cycle the the time the engine was designed to last under the normal uses it was designed for. A light duty truck is designed to be worked some of the time and the medium and heavy duty trucks are design to be worked all the time. Personally I don't read much into the duty cycles of the engines in our light duty trucks. Most of these diesel engines are design originally for use in Medium Duty trucks but at much lower power. For example: The 2004 F650 dump truck we have here at work has a 5.9 Cummins that has 215 hp. The is a truck that has a 26,000 GVWR. The same year 5.9 in the light duty trucks had 305-325 hp. The duty cycle on the engine may be the same but in the F650 it will do it with your foot on the floor 100% of the time where as the pick-ups very seldom are run that way.
transamz9 01/28/15 12:34pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Questions on new 15 Ram 3500 dual wheel

I'm going to agree with the 3:73 crowd. I pull 18,000# with my Cummins Aisin with 3:42 and have zero problems at all with power. I can run sixth 99% of the time with no problem cruising along at speed limit, drop to fifth on pretty decent hills and roll on. The 3:73's would be more than enough. FWIW I am getting 17-17.5 mixed driving unloaded. We just ordered a 2015 Laramie 4X4 with the Aisin trans. I'm going with the 3:73s, that's what we have now and the '06 does fine pulling our Suites. I wanted something "newer" and something with an exhaust brake. I'm excited to see how the new truck compares to the old 4 speed non EB Cummins! Oh and I too am getting the rear air suspension, can't wait! I hope we experience great mileage too. According to Dodge's website with the 3:73s and the Aisin transmission I'm good to pull just about 24k which would give me ample "wiggle" room. Dan You are going to love the new truck. If your '06 was/is stock it will be daylight and dark difference. My 2005 is no where near stock, engine tuning or rear suspension, and I personally still like towing with it better than my 2013 but I am just talking pulling and handling the weight. With that said, my '13 is leaps and bounds all around better than my '05 was factory but the '05 is a 2500 and the '13 is a 3500 SRW. The Aisin is what I call "the cats meow" when it comes to transmissions in these trucks. It seems like it knows what I'm thinking and does it when needed. I drive Fords and Chevys quite often and they have great transmissions also but for my driving style the Aisin is my cake and I also get to eat it too. I was never really fond of the programming in the Allison and still not (2013 is the newest I drive) but when Ford came out with their 5 speed auto behind the 6.0 I fell in love with it and think it is a great trans I just don't like that it's quick to down shift. The 6.0 is a high revving motor so it has to programmed to do that. It works really great and the downshifting in TH is about as good as any exhaust brake. The two stage exhaust brake is great in the Ram (although I wish they had a way you could do a custom setting on it). For someone that has never had an engine/exhaust brake it is the best thing since sliced bread. Congrats on the new truck and you will enjoy it.;)
transamz9 01/28/15 10:15am Tow Vehicles
RE: Questions on new 15 Ram 3500 dual wheel

Why? I still have everything in my sig too But it's not all you own that you pull with, is it??? Update doesn't mean you have to delete the old one, it just means update. Better? Or should I put everything I tow with?;)
transamz9 01/27/15 08:14pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Questions on new 15 Ram 3500 dual wheel

I'm going to agree with the 3:73 crowd. I pull 18,000# with my Cummins Aisin with 3:42 and have zero problems at all with power. I can run sixth 99% of the time with no problem cruising along at speed limit, drop to fifth on pretty decent hills and roll on. The 3:73's would be more than enough. FWIW I am getting 17-17.5 mixed driving unloaded. Need to update your sig... Why? I still have everything in my sig too
transamz9 01/27/15 07:40pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Questions on new 15 Ram 3500 dual wheel

I'm going to agree with the 3:73 crowd. I pull 18,000# with my Cummins Aisin with 3:42 and have zero problems at all with power. I can run sixth 99% of the time with no problem cruising along at speed limit, drop to fifth on pretty decent hills and roll on. The 3:73's would be more than enough. FWIW I am getting 17-17.5 mixed driving unloaded.
transamz9 01/27/15 06:41pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 6.0 Powerstroke question

Does the $2500 price include new heads? Why? Heads are not the problem but the bolts holding them down can be if you chip it and run the shi*e out of it - they can stretch. 170k miles on mine and zero issues with the heads. They love NEW batteries and the bigger the better :) Just installed my 3rd set a few weeks ago, perks the truck right up. The biggest problem with the truck the OP is buying is he knows nothing about it. If it has an OE EGR cooler,oil cooler,HPOP and SCT fitting. You are not going to change that stuff for $2500. The complete head gasket set from Ford with all the other gaskets needed is $750 alone. Oil cooler? $500.EGR cooler? The problem is he is looking at the unknown. This truck has a lot of miles on it. If it doesn't have a coolant filter installed you don't know the damage that could or has occurred. Unless you do all the work yourself labor around here is $110 per hour. Most shops remove the cab to do the head gaskets.
transamz9 01/27/15 09:07am Tow Vehicles
RE: std bed.....long bed

I know a lot of people that live by the saying " All you need is a bigger hammer" when in reality all you really need is to be smarter than the hammer. I live by the saying "work smarter not harder".
transamz9 01/26/15 06:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: std bed.....long bed

I can remember when the "long" was the standard bed. The other was called a "short" bed. :-) Still is....to me! New terms are designed to make people feel good. Don't ya know "short" is bad. It's not the size you have it's how you use it. Why drive nails with an 8lb sledge hammer?:B Finish Carpenter by trade but always carry a 8lb sledge. Really no big deal driving a long rig just get used to what you have. The truck you have is a short bed compared to what I drive as a DD. I drive a crew cab F350 with a bed that is 10' long with the bumper so I know long trucks and I prefer my short bed as you call it on my Rams.
transamz9 01/26/15 01:44pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 6.0 Powerstroke question

Jeremiah...I won't get into the badging wars, nor diesel or not wars... I spent a ton to time reading up on diesel when all of my buddies with diesels said it was the best...better than my 7.4L...even though I could keep up and toast them when driven as a 'car' Spent another ton of time on the famous thread here on the Bosch CP4. Learned a few and contributed a few Could see how the Bosch engineers added band-aid after band-aid till it is now just BARELY making the cut...even then at any moment...it can blow up to spew debris into the fuel system Common sense and a good free association talent are both missing in a large measure with both Bosch management and engineering DCL is a wonderful coating in the RIGHT application...but...using one of the best known non-stick coatings on a VERY HIGH PSI interface that then has a VERY, VERY poor lubrication medium (diesel) is just asking for problems. Non-stick as in asking the VERY POOR lube to have very high film strength to coat that best non-stick material coating... Betcha the DCL coating is 'dry' most of the time. Then that they had a 'floating' piston rod NOT connected to either the cam nor the piston bottom. Think if an ICE's piston floating without a wrist pin and the rod not connected to the crank shaft. Pure dump engineering. They should have and still can, employ a 'caged desmodromic' setup on the cam side and capture the piston to rod (IIRC...the piston might be captured to the rod, but it's been a while) I did not and still do not like the onerous SMOG measures and can only hope that they will make a big discovery to bring back the MPG of old, along with the power of diesel My issue is the weakest link continues to be the Bosch system no matter which vehicle badge More so for long term owners and used buyers...ticking time bomb IMHO The 6.0 don't have a Bosch or any other injection pump on it. The fuel is pressurized by the high pressure oil pump. You also state "I did not and still do not like the onerous SMOG measures and can only hope that they will make a big discovery to bring back the MPG of old, along with the power of diesel". How much power and MPG does your old 7.4 make? How many "Old" make 400hp and get 20 MPG on the interstate?
transamz9 01/26/15 10:56am Tow Vehicles
RE: std bed.....long bed

I can remember when the "long" was the standard bed. The other was called a "short" bed. :-) Still is....to me! New terms are designed to make people feel good. Don't ya know "short" is bad. It's not the size you have it's how you use it. Why drive nails with an 8lb sledge hammer?:B
transamz9 01/26/15 09:12am Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

:S
transamz9 01/25/15 07:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

So why don't trucking companies use a couple light weight Eco motors: remove 1 big heavy expensive oil change diesel that makes 450hp & 1650lb-ft of torque that doesn't matter... replace with 2 x 365HP Eco's that would make 730hp, but still deliver 420lbs-ft of torque down the drive line... but that doesn't matter - so this arrangement will "smoke" the big lazy 15 litre ISX ... right? Right the 730 hp gas setup with definitely smoke the 450 hp diesel. Now longevity may be a different issue. But while the gas is healthy and producing 730 hp it will be a no contest. Two 365 hp Ecos will have 840 ft lbs of torque. In first gear the Ecos can put about 6200 ft lbs of torque down the driveline with an Aisin 6 speed transmission. How can 2 x 420 lbs ft torque engines develop 840 lbs ft of torque at their crankshafts? Double the power yes but show me the math how they can increase torque beyond their capability at the crankshaft by being connected together. Two engines turning a common shaft can only double power if torque is doubled. :)thanks Hannibal... so if I am able to turn a shaft with a 3 ft bar at a certain rpm with 300lbs-ft of torque but then resistance increases and I begin to slow down, but I am still applying 300 lbs-ft., but then you put your 300lbs-ft to work opposite me on the same shaft with your 3 ft bar, and we are able to increase the rpm more, are we applying 600 to the shaft? Or are we able to overcome added resistance on the shaft ( a hill ) and turn it faster at a steady 300lbs ft thereby producing more power but not more torque? Not sure I worded that right :h If you have a bar that you are applying 300 lbft to an axle and then I get a bar and also apply 300 lbft to that same axle then we will be putting 600 lbft to that axle.
transamz9 01/25/15 06:42pm Tow Vehicles
RE: The mysteries of Horsepower and other things explained

You really don't understand that a lever creates torque. When you open a door, you are creating torque. When you drive across a bridge with your truck you are creating torque on the bridge. Yes when you drop the hitch of a travel trailer on the hitch the rear wheel becomes the rotational center point. Here's a little write up with pictures. Torque and Rotation You go ahead and stick with the door hinge theory. Door hinges are idle. They neither produce nor use torque. A door closer however uses torque produced by a coil spring to turn a shaft to which a hinged arm is attached to pull the door closed. When you drop the coupler of a trailer onto the hitch ball, the rear axle of the truck becomes the axis between the ball and front wheels. You seem to be suggesting that the tongue weight produces a rotational force on the rear wheels. Would that be forward or reverse rotational force? Which way will the rig move due to weight on the hitch ball? It take force to rotate the door on the hinge. That force is torque applied. Think of it as one of those rotating glass doors that you go through that rotates on an axle. You have to apply torque to get it rotating. Once it is rotating then you are making HP because if you continue to keeping going around that axle that the door is spinning on you are creating RPM. It takes a curtain amount of torque applied to the door to keep it rotating. If you quit applying the torque the door will stop. The door on the hinge is no different. You just can't keep going around in circles around the hinge. The tt hitch is applying torque down on the hitch trying to push it by rotating on the rear tires. If you didn't have the torque the front of the truck is applying in the opposite direction then the truck would stand straight on it's rear until something strong enough overcame the torque force which in this case would be the ground. Look at it this way: Looking at the truck from the drivers side, the axle and wheel is the stud. The rear end housing is the lug nut. The truck is a 4-way lug wrench that is attached to the lug nut. When putting the tt hitch on the ball is like you pushing down on the lug wrench with your right hand tightening the lug nut. With the front of the truck weighing what it does, the torque it is applying resisting the torque applied by the tt is greater so the front stays on the ground (although lighter)
transamz9 01/25/15 06:38pm Tow Vehicles
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 30  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2015 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS