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 > Your search for posts made by 'wilber1' found 413 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Where's the payload sticker on Rams?

Not saying they don't exist but I have never seen a payload number on a door sticker. GVWR and axle ratings are legal requirements, payload is not and will be different for every truck depending on how it is optioned.Not sure about Canada, but max. payload capacity IS a legal requirement in the US since 2005. The label on the door pillar must state "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed xxxx#/xxxxKg" That number is the max PAYLOAD capacity! Odd choice of words then. Should instead of shall or will. Should is normally used as a recommendation rather than a directive. Me Again already covered that. Not really but it doesn't matter as the only thing in question in a court would be GVWR and GAWR. There is no should when it comes to them, only shall. That''s why it is on the loading information sticker and not the load limits sticker.
wilber1 06/28/15 04:06pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Where's the payload sticker on Rams?

Not saying they don't exist but I have never seen a payload number on a door sticker. GVWR and axle ratings are legal requirements, payload is not and will be different for every truck depending on how it is optioned.Not sure about Canada, but max. payload capacity IS a legal requirement in the US since 2005. The label on the door pillar must state "The combined weight of occupants and cargo should never exceed xxxx#/xxxxKg" That number is the max PAYLOAD capacity! Odd choice of words then. Should instead of shall or will. Should is normally used as a recommendation rather than a directive.
wilber1 06/28/15 02:52pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Where's the payload sticker on Rams?

Mine I guess but one should note the word "should", in as not being the same as "shall".
wilber1 06/28/15 01:31pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Where's the payload sticker on Rams?

Not saying they don't exist but I have never seen a payload number on a door sticker. GVWR and axle ratings are legal requirements, payload is not and will be different for every truck depending on how it is optioned.
wilber1 06/28/15 01:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

Can't believe you guys have made 20 pages over maybe 35 ft lb of torque. It's about the 900 not the 35. An 11 HP increase at 1700 RPM but look how much attention it is getting them. Smart guys
wilber1 06/27/15 05:48pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

My sources say no on the next Powerstroke being 1,000 lb-ft in the 2017. Also, just because you increase torque at 1,700 rpm does not mean it will effect peak horsepower at 2,800 rpm. The 900 lb-ft of torque will increase the horsepower at 1,700 rpm to 291hp, but that is still not greater than the peak 385hp at 2,800 rpm. To be sure, a lot of it is about bragging rights. Trucks are the muscle car wars of the new millennium but 1500 to 2000 RPM is the range that most of us tow in so any increase in power in that range is much more useable than peak HP. That's the big difference between the 650 Cummins and the 800. They both make the same peak HP at the same RPM so theoretically they should both get to the top of the hill at the same time, at the same speed, in the same gear at WOT. The difference comes in when towing in rolling terrain at around 1600 RPM in 6th (pretty common with this engine) The 650 will have to shift down much more often because the 800 can make 45 more HP at that RPM. The 800 can hold a gear longer before down shifting even if it can't get to the top of the hill any faster. That is a real increase in useful power to me. It might not mean much to the peak HP crowd who just want to get to the top of the hill first but it sure works for me when towing a 5th wheel.
wilber1 06/26/15 08:35pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

They don't say it. If you follow the links on FishOnOne's link you will come to the factory press release. It says peak torque has gone from 865 to 900. It doesn't say anything about peak torque remaining the same. It also states they have gone from 12 bolt to 16 bolts on the "ring gear hardware". Wouldn't be the first time they have increased peak torque without increasing peak HP. 350/650 to 350/800 in mid 2011.
wilber1 06/26/15 04:40pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

Here's more on the topic. Link Here's an interesting statement from the article and I guess horsepower has stayed the same: Interestingly, horsepower and peak torque numbers stay exactly the same, yet torque has increased by 35 pounds-feet. That makes no sense. If it makes 900 lbft, that is peak torque.
wilber1 06/26/15 04:29pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Commute too short for diesel?

By the time your coolant temperature reaches normal, your oil will still be luke warm. I take my truck out for at least a half hour run on the freeway before I drain the oil.
wilber1 06/26/15 11:58am Tow Vehicles
RE: Commute too short for diesel?

Personally, I think it is too short for a diesel the size of a 6.7. You won't get that much iron, oil and water properly warmed up in six miles. You might if you were towing, but not empty. Might be OK if you give it a couple of good runs every week.
wilber1 06/26/15 11:49am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

Anyway, back to 900 ft/lbs. It would be interesting to put it on a scope see when you get a full 900 ft/lbs. My bet is not very often. With electronics the manufactures can play all sorts of BS numbers games. I can hear it now. Buy brand X because we have 2,000 ft/lbs of torque. What they don't tell you is it's only going to be for a micro second. It's a very slippery slope if you ask me. Pretty soon the whole rating system is going to be bogus if the powers that be let them keep this up. I'd wager you get the full 900 at 1,700rpm in gears 3 through 6. Giving 900 for just a macrosecond would be a big lawsuit down the road, precedent has long been set. You bet. An instant 900 lbft in first gear with 4:10 gears. Who would want that? You would have a hell of a time getting the truck moving at all without breaking the rear wheels loose. With an empty truck you would be getting wheel spin in just about every gear. You would have to put slicks on the thing. These are supposed to be tow vehicles, not drag racers.
wilber1 06/26/15 11:31am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram owners with flip up mirrors

Flip mine up when every I tow. Set Mirror memory one for the down position and memory two for the flip up position. X2 The convex mirror works fine in both positions without re adjusting.
wilber1 06/25/15 08:21pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

I never said they were the same thing, I said they are both forms of torque management. You can resort to name calling if you wish but the fact you can't comprehend that both systems manage the amount of torque going to the wheels is your problem, not mine. Yes you did here... A lot of vehicles have torque management. It's called traction control. Posted: 06/24/15 10:38pm You inferred that the torque management that we were discussing is a part of traction control. I didn't infer anything, I merely stated a fact. You're the one who deided to tear his hair out over it.
wilber1 06/25/15 06:26pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

Well don't hurt yourself..... I was going to just let it go with that last post with the pic, but since you want to continue to be an anus then I will oblige your request of how the torque management that everyone else is talking about in this thread is NOT the same as traction control. First off, the torque management(or TM) that the rest of us in this thread were talking about is when the ECM cuts power to the engine between shifts so that the driveline will have less of a shock load on each shift and to increase their chances of not having to pay out during the warranty period(more on this later). The ECM(Engine Control Module) mapping or programming for this TM is separate from the mapping of the traction control(or TC), and THEY ARE NOT THE SAME. I am unsure if you know how engine/vehicle mapping works(or anything for that matter), but in its very basic form an ECMs mapping is pre-programmed commands for the engine/vehicle to respond given a certain set of criteria. For the TM that we are talking about, the ECM is programmed to cut power from the engine on every upshift and/or in lower rpms or gears. Traction control(or TC) is not the same as the type of TM that we are talking about and actually has a separate ECM mapping for this. Traction control will also cut engine power(like the TM we are talking about will) along with applying the brakes of the vehicle to regain or gain traction. Just because they both cut engine power does NOT mean they are the same thing. They are used for different purposes and are completely separate from each other in their uses so don't get them confused. If you say torque management in a Ram, Ford, GM, or any other forum then they will know that you are referring to the ECM cutting power between shifts and NOT the traction control cutting power to gain traction. For some odd reason you want to link them as the same since the both limit torque output even though just about nobody else in the known world does (besides 1 Ausie), and even the engineers that know they are two different things. Although I think this has more to do with the fact that you do not like admitting when you are wrong and will use "attrition" so you don't have to admit it even though just about everyone else is proving you wrong. I never said they were the same thing, I said they are both forms of torque management. You can resort to name calling if you wish but the fact you can't comprehend that both systems manage the amount of torque going to the wheels is your problem, not mine.
wilber1 06/25/15 05:41pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

Wheel spin is caused by excess torque at the wheel and traction control works to manage that torque. If you look at RobertRyan's post, three of the methods used involve reducing engine output and the other BS's the differential into transferring torque to another wheel. Whether it is used to limit wheel spin or prevent parts from breaking, it is still torque management. you're not even close to describing TQ management. TQ management is controlled by the ECM and TCM based on the throttle wires position all of this is occurring well before any power or fuel is being added to the engine or transferred to the rear wheels. Traction control is when one wheel spins more than the other causing the ECM and ABS to reduce engine power and apply the brakes to control the vehicle. You can turn off traction control and power brake till your hearts content but you can't run WOT from a red light get wheel spin due to TQ management. Your analogy of TQ management and traction control is like saying an exhaust brake is the same as ABS; both slow the vehicle down without locking the tires up. No, I am saying both systems manage torque and they do. If you don't think an exhaust brake can lock up your wheels, try using it on a slippery surface. It doesn't manage torque or provide anti lock protection at all.
wilber1 06/25/15 03:35pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

How exactly does traction control work then if it doesn't do it by managing torque? My face.... http://vignette2.wikia.nocookie.net/powerlisting/images/5/50/Implied_Facepalm.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20131206112402 height=300 width=400 when I read this post. Followed by a head shake. Well don't hurt yourself. Wheel spin is caused by excess torque at the wheel and traction control works to manage that torque. If you look at RobertRyan's post, three of the methods used involve reducing engine output and the other BS's the differential into transferring torque to another wheel. Whether it is used to limit wheel spin or prevent parts from breaking, it is still torque management.
wilber1 06/25/15 11:30am Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

The cheapest traction control modulates your brakes to keep wheel RPM within a close delta. Many times it is just additional logic within an ABS setup. Smarter traction control will retard engine output along with selective wheel braking. Retarding engine output is managing torque. Another good reason to manage torque in low gears is to keep you from ripping the tires off your TV.
wilber1 06/24/15 11:31pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

A lot of vehicles have torque management. It's called traction control. False! Torque management is NOT traction control. Torque management is the ECM cutting the power of the engine between shifts and in low rpms to save the transmission and driveline. With diesels, the ECM will lower boost levels and fuel delivery to manage the amount of torque going through the driveline. Traction control is something totally different and is used for totally different reasons. Also to everyone else, a lot what most perceive as torque management is actually the laggy and slow to respond pedal in DBW(Drive By Wire systems). Just because one mashes there pedal down does not mean they are sending telling the engine to give you 100% power. The DBW sends a signal to the ECM and the ECM will dictate how much power for the engine to give. One may press their pedal down 50%, but the ECM is telling the engine to only be at 25%. There are ways to get around this like the BD throttle sensitivity booster. Of course not all of it is the pedal and a tuner will go the rest of the way in taking off torque management or force the engine to not lower boost or fuel at lower rpms and between shifts. How exactly does traction control work then if it doesn't do it by managing torque?
wilber1 06/24/15 11:19pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

Gee, I guess I misread the topic title. Here I thought it was about a 6.7 Cummins making 900 lbft. My bad. I guess you also misread where the OP stated... Everyone knows that a in-line engine makes tons of torque down low and thru the mid rpm range and a V8 is just the opposite so the V8 should be able to out run the Ram over a long haul. He was talking about inline engines in general so I replied..... False! I am starting to not take you seriously on how much false information you have posted in this thread. There are many characteristics of an engine that determines when it gets its power, but the cylinder configuration is NOT one of them. The stroke length of the engine has a lot more to do with when an engine gets its torque. There are a lot more dynamics in an engines design that effect its characteristics as well. Currently all three light heavy duty diesel engines get their peak torque at 1,600 rpm. The only odd man out its the Cummins high output variant that gets its peak torque at a higher 1,700 rpm. Here is some light reading with the actual differences between a I6 and V8 diesel. I6 versus V8 diesel. So do some more reading before jumping in a topic that you don't know about. Although I do think this is an extension our last debate. Actually the OP said nothing about other engines. The OP was just about the new Cummins 900 and he didn't make his second post until the end of page 4. As with just about every other Ram diesel thread in the past year, the usual culprits have turned it into a EB vs ED thread. I've got news for all of them . Cummins didn't build either of them!
wilber1 06/24/15 09:43pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Ram Goes to Stunning 900 lb-ft of torque

900 ft lbs or torque will be awesome. The torque management that comes along with that engine will be less than awesome. Would be nice to see Ram fix that flaw in their programming. What flaw? Most high powered engines have tm. One example would be the 2015 M3. 900LB/FT from a stop would be unmanageable in a rear-light pu application. Nice to have when pulling a grade though A lot of vehicles have torque management. It's called traction control.
wilber1 06/24/15 09:38pm Tow Vehicles
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