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 > Your search for posts made by 'wilber1' found 604 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Towing with Full Water Tank?

If you can't carry water in your fresh water tank, why install a tank in the first place? Logic my friends.
wilber1 04/24/14 05:30pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: HP vs altitude & gas vs diesel

It's not gas vs. diesel that is the difference. A turbocharged gasser will maintain higher % of power at higher altitudes too. There just have not been many turbocharged gas engines in thee history of pickups. F-150 Ecoboost does very well at altitude. Yup, before jet engines, some piston engine aircraft with two stage superchargers were flying around above 30,000 ft. They weren't diesels.
wilber1 04/24/14 12:21pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Traveling to Canada,need info

Yes I'm sure that you know the height of your unit in feet, but do you know what it is in metres, as all the height signs in Canada are in metres! Is 10' 6" very high? :) 3.2 meters
wilber1 04/23/14 08:36pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Air pockets on roof

Mine is unglued all along the edges. I ask the dealer and they said there are needed for expansion and contraction. Huh?
wilber1 04/23/14 10:33am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Should my 5th wheel have shock absorbers?

Present 5er came with shocks, new one on order doesn't. We'll see how it works.
wilber1 04/22/14 03:54pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: dual pane windows on an RV

Present unit has them. One we have on order also has them.
wilber1 04/22/14 01:38pm General RVing Issues
RE: The best BLT & home fries in Alaska (and any where else too)

With the city being so multicultural in population, there is a different place for every night to eat out, it seems. Think I read the figure, of 685 licensed eating establishments in the town/borough. Some of my favorites were those with an Asian type menu and ambiance, of which there were many. At one time, while I was living in the Interior and visited Anchorage, way too often with my work, it was in the paper, that Japan Airlines was keeping 58 aircraft crews in Anchorage. Most had their families with them and the airlines even operated a school for their children, in the Japanese language and traditions. Japan Air, was one of the major carriers, that used Anchorage as a stop for fuel, crew changes, resupply, etc. on their way to Europe, and south down the west coast. Many of their flights were freighters, hauling everything from live cattle to boxes of wine, some headed back to Japan and some over the north pole to Europe. So it was not hard to find a place that served excellent Asian foods, from most of the cultures from that part of the world. Anchorage is a great meeting place for freighter pilots from all over. I used to be one of them for a few years back in the nineties. If you fly freight and haven't seen someone for a few years, your best chance of meeting up with them will probably be in Anchorage or Narita Japan. At that time, some favorite haunts around the Anchorage Hilton were, F Street Station, Darwin's Theory, Blondies for breakfast, Sweet Basil for a good soup and sandwich, and Simon and Seaforts for something more up scale. The Hilton also had a pretty good pub style sports bar with decent food but got remodeled and became a little too trendy for mere freight dogs. For a great BLT and soup in Lynden WA, try Dutch Mothers. The sandwiches are so big, DW and I split one with an extra order of soup.
wilber1 04/22/14 12:44pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Shifting into neutral

Even illegal in Canukistan Ya'll do whatever you're going to do. Try not to kill anyone else in the process, eh? I don't know what your problem is. No one has suggested making a practice of coasting down hills in neutral. One person posted that if engine braking is giving you control problems in very slippery conditions, try putting the vehicle in neutral so the brakes can do their work without interference from the engine. You then start flaming them and calling people idiots. There comes a point whenever we stop a vehicle that the engine stops providing braking and starts to try and push the car. It has to in order to keep from stalling. Normally we don't notice this with an automatic because the torque converter won't let the engine stall. The engine is still trying to push the car but the tires have enough traction to prevent it. This can be a problem when driving on ice in traffic. If it is a problem, put the car in neutral so the engine isn't interfering with the brake system. This is not rocket science, a person driving a manual does it every time they come to a stop. That is what a clutch does, disconnect the engine from the drive axles. Bottom line, the only real idiot is the one that doesn't do whatever it takes to control their vehicle.
wilber1 04/20/14 03:58pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Shifting into neutral

What you say about cruise and the ebrake is true but the principle is the same. Front brakes wear faster because most front engine vehicles carry more weight up front and under braking, weight shifts off the back to the front. That's why front brakes are much larger than rears. Unless the front of the car somehow comes detached from the rear, engine braking helps both sets of brakes. Both sets are stopping the same vehicle after all. I'm not suggesting one should put a vehicle in neutral at speed but if you are trying to come to a stop on a downhill in very slippery conditions, you will not be able to do it in a RWD non ABS vehicle without locking the front brakes unless you put it in neutral. Those back wheels will keep on turning with the fronts locked or you will have to lock all four. How exactly does engine braking help slow the front axle if not in 4WD? Both my Dodges (2500 diesel 4x4 48re '03 and '07) the front and rear disks are the same size. Did you not drive in winter up there back when just about everything was RWD or a clunky 4WD with front disks, drum rears, and no ABS? Did you spend eternity skidding? Why am I wasting my time with this? You aren't slowing the axle, you are slowing the vehicle. You can quit wasting my time any time you like.
wilber1 04/19/14 09:59pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Only 2 of the 9 SUV's passed the safety crash tests

I just don't think we should have any illusions of what we are about and should admit that by choosing to be "safe" by driving a large heavy vehicle, it could very well end up being at someone else's expense. So, are you saying that a person should be a noble martyr, and choose the smallest, lightest vehicle possible, so as to not endanger the other drivers? As long as there are 40-ton trucks on the road, I'm going to go with a large vehicle. I've got a much better chance in my Suburban than a smart car if a 40-ton semi decides to intrude on my personal space. Or, in the case of Michigan, an 80-ton semi. If you think you will stand a much better chance against a 40 or 80 ton semi you are delusional.
wilber1 04/19/14 09:01pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Shifting into neutral

Doesn't matter. ABS, 2wd, 4wd, duals, 10 wheeler, 18 wheeler, any vehicle with locked brakes is nearly uncontrollable. Putting your transmission in neutral removes a crucial element of control and increases the likelyhood of locking your brakes. Yes any vehicle with locked brakes is almost uncontrollable and if the rear brakes need extra pressure to override the engine, the greater the likelihood you will lock the fronts in the attempt. Basically the same reason manufacturers emphasize not to use cruise control or the exhaust brake in slippery conditions, you wind up with the wrong end steering the vehicle. Cruise powers your rear into slides, Jakes brake the rear axle too much and cause slides. Your drive axle is already trying to slow more than the steer axle when you release the throttle due to engine braking. Ever notice that on RWD vehicles, the front brakes always wear out sooner than the rears? It's because native engine braking is helping the rear brakes! Override engine power in order to slow the vehicle...sure, if one's right foot were on the throttle and left foot on the brakes. The only time any vehicle should be in neutral with the engine running is while parked on a level surface with the parking brake set and tires chocked. What you say about cruise and the ebrake is true but the principle is the same. Front brakes wear faster because most front engine vehicles carry more weight up front and under braking, weight shifts off the back to the front. That's why front brakes are much larger than rears. Unless the front of the car somehow comes detached from the rear, engine braking helps both sets of brakes. Both sets are stopping the same vehicle after all. I'm not suggesting one should put a vehicle in neutral at speed but if you are trying to come to a stop on a downhill in very slippery conditions, you will not be able to do it in a RWD non ABS vehicle without locking the front brakes unless you put it in neutral. Those back wheels will keep on turning with the fronts locked or you will have to lock all four.
wilber1 04/19/14 08:36pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Only 2 of the 9 SUV's passed the safety crash tests

You allege vehicles are getting heavier and that is making us less safe. Let's cut to the chase - vehicle fatalities. If we are becoming less safe in our vehicles, why does the fatality rate continue to drop? If you look at deaths per miles driven, the fatality rate in 1988 was 2.32 per hundred million miles traveled. In 2012, the rate was 1.14. That's a drop of 50%. How can that be? I'm not arguing we are becoming less safe, I am arguing that making vehicles heavier is not one of the reasons why and that they would be even safer if they were lighter and still met the same criteria when it came to crash testing. Simple energy management. On Edit. That car Kubica was driving weighed about 1500 lbs including fuel and driver. Making it heavier would not have made it safer. So, we finally get down to it - it's not "fair" that some people drive big cars or trucks? What do you suggest? Everybody be forced to drive the same size/weight car? I own a 3/4-ton Suburban because it fits my needs. And frankly, because I can. I can afford the price (bought it with cash, not financed), I can afford the gas (12 MPG), and I like it. Frankly, crashworthiness wasn't even a thought. I understand that it can easily kill me or others, like any other vehicle, and I treat it with respect, just like I'd treat a gun with respect. I'm not saying it is not fair, look at my sig. I also realize it is not possible for everyone to drive the same size of vehicle. I do say the roads would be a lot safer if everyone was driving Smart Cars than if they were all driving 1T dualies. I just don't think we should have any illusions of what we are about and should admit that by choosing to be "safe" by driving a large heavy vehicle, it could very well end up being at someone else's expense.
wilber1 04/19/14 08:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Shifting into neutral

Doesn't matter. ABS, 2wd, 4wd, duals, 10 wheeler, 18 wheeler, any vehicle with locked brakes is nearly uncontrollable. Putting your transmission in neutral removes a crucial element of control and increases the likelyhood of locking your brakes. Yes any vehicle with locked brakes is almost uncontrollable and if the rear brakes need extra pressure to override the engine, the greater the likelihood you will lock the fronts in the attempt. Basically the same reason manufacturers emphasize not to use cruise control or the exhaust brake in slippery conditions, you wind up with the wrong end steering the vehicle.
wilber1 04/19/14 06:33pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Shifting into neutral

Come to MT and put it in neutral on Bozeman or Butte passes some time, snow or otherwise doesn't matter. Congratulations on getting me to sign up just to point out how dumb an idea this is. Can depend on how your ABS works. Back in the day when RWD cars were most common it wasn't unusual to see someone slowly going down a hill in snow with the front wheels locked and the rears still turning because the vehicle was still in gear. Watched a guy in an older car do it on the Coquihalla just a couple of years ago. He couldn't figure out why he wasn't slowing down any more.
wilber1 04/19/14 05:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Only 2 of the 9 SUV's passed the safety crash tests

The human body can take a lot if it is properly supported and protected. After observation, Kubica was released from hospital the next day. Injuries were a concussion and a sprained ankle. Robert Kubica Canadian GP 2007
wilber1 04/19/14 05:06pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Only 2 of the 9 SUV's passed the safety crash tests

travelnutz I don't dispute any of that but with the average vehicle becoming heavier and heavier, it becomes less than a zero sum game and we become less safe, simply because the greater mass an object has, the more force it exerts at a given velocity. Anyone who has swung a hammer should know that. Perhaps instead of thinking about how safe we are in our big trucks, we should be conscious of the fact that if we are in a collision with a smaller vehicle, regardless of who is at fault, the greatest amount of the resulting grief and carnage will be because of our vehicle, not the smaller one. Not only that but the greater weight of our vehicles makes them less able to avoid a collision. A feller named Newton said so over 300 years ago and things haven't changed. So, instead of maintaining that heavy vehicles are safer, we should be asking ourselves, safer for who, because it is the large vehicle that has the most potential to do damage, cause injury and death.
wilber1 04/19/14 02:45pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2014 Ram tow haul mode question

He is asking about the 1500 which uses different transmissions than the Cummins and 6.4. Also, he doesn't specify whether he means the 65rfe or 8 spd ZF. Cummins and 6.4 answers may not apply.
wilber1 04/19/14 10:28am Tow Vehicles
RE: Only 2 of the 9 SUV's passed the safety crash tests

That's the whole point, it's the larger vehicles mass that makes the collision more dangerous, not the smaller vehicles lack of mass. Now you're just arguing semantics. The bottom line is the occupant in the diesel will experience less force on their body. That's all I'm trying to say. The occupant in the heavier vehicle has a better chance. Let's speak hypothetically with a semi-educated guess. The impact slows the diesel from 50 to 25 MPH. To the occupant of the diesel, it's the equivalent of hitting a brick wall at 25 MPH. The bug's velocity after impact is 25 MPH in the opposite direction. That's the equivalent of hitting a wall at 75 MPH. Who's more likely to escape with minimal injury? Not really, you are only safer in a larger vehicle if everyone else is in a smaller vehicle. If everyone is in a larger vehicle you are less safe simply because of the amount of energy that must be absorbed in a collision. Twice as much energy must be absorbed when two 4000 lb vehicles collide than when two 2000 vehicles collide.
wilber1 04/18/14 11:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Shifting into neutral

Exactly the opposite of what I thought would happen. Thought one of the features of the Allison is grade braking. if you owned an Allison you would know it does a great job grade braking. chevman Right, so engine RPM should be following vehicle speed not throttle position and there is no way it should be at 900 -1000 RPM at 65 MPH if the truck is in gear.
wilber1 04/18/14 10:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Only 2 of the 9 SUV's passed the safety crash tests

Less kinetic energy is one reason a Smart Car can survive the same barrier test as an Escalade even though it has very little crush zone. That and an extremely strong passenger cage. On the money Wilber. Really good posts Ben. And now a little question: A 2000lb bug and an 80,000 diesel hit each other. Who imparts more energy on who? A grape and a bowling ball hit each other. Who imparts more energy on who? Sorry Ben and Wilber, you don't get to answer. You have an unfair advantage of understanding. :B Lets let some other people answer this one. Hint: The answer is in both Ben and Wilber's really good posts. So, you're saying you'd rather be in the 2,000-lb bug? I'll answer your question with a question. The bug and the diesel are both traveling at 50 mph and hit head-on. What is the aftermath of the impact? In other words, what is the resulting velocity of each of the vehicles after the impact? Which occupants are subject to greater forces? That's the whole point, it's the larger vehicles mass that makes the collision more dangerous, not the smaller vehicles lack of mass. If you are both in bugs you would be no worse off than if you were both in diesels. In fact, you would probably be better off because cars are subject to more severe crash standards than trucks. Not only that but the car has more active safety, it is much more agile and can stop faster.
wilber1 04/18/14 05:36pm Tow Vehicles
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