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 > Your search for posts made by 'wilber1' found 397 matches.

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RE: 2012 Ram Exhaust/Engine brake question!

I am not saying that the 68RFE shifts poorly. What I am saying is that these trucks (as well as those from the competitors) could improve by allowing a paddle shifter that would allow the driver to more easily and quickly choose their own gear. If you haven't driven a vehicle with paddle shifters you really don't know what you are missing. They perform much better than a column shift with a button on the end that only limits the top gear the truck can use. Have you ever sat in a Ram/Dodge pickup with a 6speed auto trans, either one? Every one I've been in has a +/- button on the shifter that allows manual up and down gear changes when you put the shifter in manual mode. Like a paddle shifter but not on the steering wheel. Or are you just speculating for the sake of discussion? The Ram ERS doesn't allow manual up changes, it restricts the gear that the transmission can shift up to. You can force the transmission to downshift but it upshifts in its own good time. It is a good feature but not a real manual mode. If you select 5 or 4 etc, it just turns the transmission into a 5 or 4 speed automatic. Not the same at all and Bionic Man does know what he is talking about. Well then I stand corrected. My apologies. I know on the 2014 68rfe I had most recently, you could drop gears one at a time and limit the top gear before going into manual mode. Appeared to hold whatever gear you put it in, in manual mode without up shifting, but I do know that if you left "locked" in a higher gear in M mode and then slowed to a stop, it would downshift enough gears to not kill the engine and to get you going again albeit in 2nd or 3rd gear. Is it possible that in M mode that it only holds the selected gear until getting into over rev territory and then forces an up shift if the driver doesn't recognize he needs to up shift or start wrecking stuff if the rpms keep going up? Kind of like want it does on the low end of the rpm range. Been years since I've been in the early 68re trucks so my memory could be slipping. ERS doesn't lock the transmission in any gear, the transmission works normally but ERS won't let it shift into a higher gear than the one selected. I don't know of any vehicles that don't have rev limiters any more so with a low gear selected, the transmission won't shift up but the engine won't over rev either. You will just wonder why things are so noisy.
wilber1 09/26/16 06:30pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2012 Ram Exhaust/Engine brake question!

My 11 with 68RFE and 15 with Aisin both have the up/down rocker with on the shifter. Work great! You people really need to try selecting a gear when descending a grade that puts the rpm's in the high 2K range then hit cruise for the speed that you feel comfortable with. WITH EB and TH FULL on. Tried it and didn't really like it. For one thing, I don't always want full EB when descending a hill and T/H tends to have the EB cycling in order to try and maintain a target speed. For another, having cruise control commanding the throttle when I am going downhill with a big load behind makes me feel uncomfortable. Each to their own.
wilber1 09/26/16 03:41pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2012 Ram Exhaust/Engine brake question!

I am not saying that the 68RFE shifts poorly. What I am saying is that these trucks (as well as those from the competitors) could improve by allowing a paddle shifter that would allow the driver to more easily and quickly choose their own gear. If you haven't driven a vehicle with paddle shifters you really don't know what you are missing. They perform much better than a column shift with a button on the end that only limits the top gear the truck can use. Have you ever sat in a Ram/Dodge pickup with a 6speed auto trans, either one? Every one I've been in has a +/- button on the shifter that allows manual up and down gear changes when you put the shifter in manual mode. Like a paddle shifter but not on the steering wheel. Or are you just speculating for the sake of discussion? The Ram ERS doesn't allow manual up changes, it restricts the gear that the transmission can shift up to. You can force the transmission to downshift but it upshifts in its own good time. It is a good feature but not a real manual mode. If you select 5 or 4 etc, it just turns the transmission into a 5 or 4 speed automatic. Not the same at all and Bionic Man does know what he is talking about.
wilber1 09/26/16 03:24pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2012 Ram Exhaust/Engine brake question!

I wish the trucks had a true gear shift option - not just the ability to limit what the top gear selected is. I think paddle shifts like the sports cars have would be a nice option. My 68rfe downshifts manually just fine. Has something changed? Problem is, with T/H on, it downshifts automatically when I don't want it to. All ERS does is restrict the top gear you can use. My car has paddle shifters and I find my fingers looking for them every time I get into my truck. That is why we have on/off buttons. I turn T/H off on downhills, I prefer to do the downshifting myself as needed. Much smoother. So do I.
wilber1 09/25/16 06:46pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2012 Ram Exhaust/Engine brake question!

I wish the trucks had a true gear shift option - not just the ability to limit what the top gear selected is. I think paddle shifts like the sports cars have would be a nice option. My 68rfe downshifts manually just fine. Has something changed? Problem is, with T/H on, it downshifts automatically when I don't want it to. All ERS does is restrict the top gear you can use. My car has paddle shifters and I find my fingers looking for them every time I get into my truck.
wilber1 09/24/16 06:23pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Disaster averted but barely. Thanking the good Lord above.

The tire shop I now use hangs a card on the mirror stating the pressures and torque used. Before you leave they tell you to come back the next day to have them re torqued. Nice touch I think.
wilber1 09/23/16 12:04pm Tow Vehicles
RE: 2012 Ram Exhaust/Engine brake question!

I never use TH mode and the EB at the same time when not towing. Makes for a jerky drive thru town and anywhere else you need to be constantly slowing down. I run the EB all the time when towing though. I also don't use TH mode with the EB when descending mtn passes. The truck always wants to slow down too much. So I just run the EB and use the gear selector. I only tow 9000lbs so maybe guys towing heavier get better use out of TH/EB at the same time. X2. Very happy with my truck, but I don't like the T/H. Even when towing 16000 pounds. I wish the trucks had a true gear shift option - not just the ability to limit what the top gear selected is. I think paddle shifts like the sports cars have would be a nice option. My thoughts as well. I will use T/H when starting out because it delays the upshifts ( could do that with the ERS as well I guess) but don't like the way it works with the EB.
wilber1 09/22/16 08:20pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Is 70 the age to stop towing

I just bought my last 5er at 68 and passed the written test and 1+ hour pre trip inspection and road test I needed to tow it legally in my province. So no, and not anytime soon unless my health goes south. Motor homes with towds don't count. You can't back those things up regardless of age.
wilber1 09/22/16 06:52pm General RVing Issues
RE: Changing a tire on tt what do you use?

I carry a bottle jack which works fine for jacking one wheel. Also torque wrench, appropriate sockets etc. I would call Good Sam ERS first though.
wilber1 09/22/16 06:39pm General RVing Issues
RE: Canadians driving in USA

It was stupid.
wilber1 09/22/16 03:51pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Was retirement for you a good or not so good choice?

I enjoyed doing my job which had mandatory retirement at 60. It's been 10 years now and I don't miss it a bit. It seems like another life. The time has gone by in a flash trying to do things while we are still healthy enough to do them. Life is too short to spend it doing just one thing and as long as you are healthy, there is no reason to be bored if you don't want to be.
wilber1 09/21/16 08:40pm General RVing Issues
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

The weakest component will always determine the limit for the complete structure. Only the manufacturer knows what that is. Eg: you can physically put a 5K brake on a 7K axle. You may be able to carry 7K but you can't stop it, therefore your design limit is 5K, not 7K. To be rated at 7K an axle needs to have 7K of braking power. The rear axle in my 2001, from Dana has a rating of 11,000#, in my truck, it is rated at 6,084# which is the capacity of the stock 245/75-16E tires (The weakest component). This axle has the same brakes as the 2001 3500 axle rated at a bit over 7,000# so brakes not the limit. My 2001 has a camper package and Optional 265/75-16E tires rated at 6,830# for the pair. So based on the facts stated above I could consider my axle rated at 6,830# as the Camper Package also includes 3500 springs. I don't need to as I am still 500# under the stock 6,084# rating. Isn't that what I was saying? I follow your logic but you can consider whatever you want, your axles are still rated at 6084#. Could that possibly be an issue for you? My guess is no but that's just my guess. It's odd that the higher axle rating wasn't included in a factory package that included the higher rated tires. I also believe your GVWR remains at 8800#. I was thinking along the lines of 5-6 and 7k trailer axles where the brake assemblies are interchangeable. Replacing a 7k brake with a 5k brake would reduce the axle's capacity to 5k, even though it still has the larger structure and bearings that make it able to support 7k. I don't pretend to know why manufacturers chose a particular GVWR for a vehicle and I'm not about to make assumptions about how they do. Just because some states may legislate a maximum GVWR for 3/4 tons, doesn't mean all states do and all GVWR's are determined that way. 1T GVWRs are increasing with every new truck that comes out. You can say it is all about bragging rights but the engineering still has to be there to back them up.
wilber1 09/21/16 12:43pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

The weakest component will always determine the limit for the complete structure. Only the manufacturer knows what that is. Eg: you can physically put a 5K brake on a 7K axle. You may be able to carry 7K but you can't stop it, therefore your design limit is 5K, not 7K.
wilber1 09/21/16 10:29am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

Correct. It also tells us the gross weight is the sum of the axle ratings and not the vehicle mfg GVWR number. Exactly, it is instructions on how to weigh a vehicle in order to determine its gross weight, nothing more. ?? I have no idea where you came up with that one. I'm reading it the way it is written, I don't know what you are reading into it. I'll put you down in the, placarded GVWR is just useless information column.
wilber1 09/20/16 08:24pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

Now your mis quoting what Ford says The quote from Ford says; "Front and rear GAWRs will, in all cases, sum to a number equal to or greater than the GVWR for the particular vehicle." You quoted it, not me. Of course the "front and rear GAWR's will, in all cases, sum to a number equal or greater than the GVWR for the particular vehicle" How the heck could you give a 10K GVWR to a vehicle that only had a 9K sum of front and rear GAWR's? That doesn't make the sum of the GAWR's a substitute for the GVWR. That is why they are given as two separate numbers. (3) In determining the gross weight of a vehicle or the gross weight of any two (2) or more consecutive axles under subsection (1) or (2) or (9) of this section, the total gross weight of the vehicle or combination of vehicles or the gross weight of any two (2) or more consecutive axles shall be the sum of the axle weights. For the purposes of this chapter the gross weight of a vehicle or the gross weight of any two (2) or more consecutive axles may be determined by accumulatively adding the separate weights of individual axles and tandem axles or groups of axles to determine gross weight."** This just tells how to determine the actual gross weight of a vehicle, it says nothing about how a GVWR is determined by a manufacturer.
wilber1 09/20/16 05:21pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

Manufacturers will always choose axles that are rated higher than the trucks GVWR. If you read your own quote from Ford it says exactly that, it does not say that combined axle ratings are a substitute for the truck's GVWR. As already mentioned, it is not economical to design and build a different axle to match every different GVWR. Also, they have to add axle capacity to account for differences in loading. As 5th wheel owners we are primarily concerned with rear axle limits because we know our pin weight puts little or no extra weight on the front axle, but that same truck has to have enough front axle capacity for the guy in the North who runs around with a snow plow hanging from the front of his truck for most of the year. That does not mean the truck manufacturer is saying it is OK for us to drive down the highway with our rear axle maxed out by a 5th wheel, plus a snow plow hanging from the front of our truck, even if we are within our axle ratings. Also, who hasn't seen one of these trucks with a dirt bike or rack full of fuel cans hanging off the front? I'm not making assumptions about what the truck manufacturer or NTSA means when they set weight limits, or whether it is OK to exceed them, you guys are. The only assumption I am making is that because GVWR is a limit that is required by law to be placarded alongside AWR's, it must have weight and meaning. Personally, I don't have a big problem with running two or three hundred pounds over my GVWR. I know that the manufacturer will have built in safety margins because he knows his trucks will be operated overloaded. However, I don't know what those margins are and I don't kid myself into believing that I'm not in unknown territory when it comes to performance, structure and legality. I think it is irresponsible to tell people that they aren't.
wilber1 09/20/16 10:46am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

Well actually the GOVERNMENT mandates the 10,000#GVWR on the 250/2500/ 3/4 Ton group of trucks, in many states this allows a lower registration and avoids have to register as commercial. The exceptions are the 20013 to 2014 Rams. So, load it up like a one ton then. You're golden. :R
wilber1 09/19/16 11:03pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

Actually it makes perfect sense. A truck mfg isn't about to use a lightweight 1/2 ton frame and then give the truck a 6k fawr and a 7000 RAWR. The truck maker may choose any GVWR he wants up to and including the sum of the vehicles GAWRs. So the truck breaks in half but that's OK because the axle ratings haven't been exceeded. That makes perfect sense to you? Yes, the truck maker could choose any GVWR up to the combined axle ratings but they don't. Why do you think that is? Could it be that the rest of the truck isn't up to supporting the combined axle ratings? Because he can't tailor make axles for each truck, he has to choose axles that are rated higher than the capacity of the rest of the truck. That's simple logic. Why do you think manufacturers do and are required to placard GVWR alongside AWR? What does GVWR mean to you exactly, or is it just useless information? Well once again with few exceptions a 250/2500 is simply a 350/3500 SRW with possibly softer springs, and a GVWR LIMITED by its Class 2 designation. They (250/2500's) with a few exceptions share the same frame and drive train (350/3500's). So, what's your point? They have different GVWR's for a reason. You don't get to make up the reason. Only the manufacturer does, just like you don't get to make up an axle or tire rating because of how you think it is built.
wilber1 09/19/16 10:33pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why doesn't the math work?

Actually it makes perfect sense. A truck mfg isn't about to use a lightweight 1/2 ton frame and then give the truck a 6k fawr and a 7000 RAWR. The truck maker may choose any GVWR he wants up to and including the sum of the vehicles GAWRs. So the truck breaks in half but that's OK because the axle ratings haven't been exceeded. That makes perfect sense to you? Yes, the truck maker could choose any GVWR up to the combined axle ratings but they don't. Why do you think that is? Could it be that the rest of the truck isn't up to supporting the combined axle ratings? Because he can't tailor make axles for each truck, he has to choose axles that are rated higher than the capacity of the rest of the truck. That's simple logic. Why do you think manufacturers do and are required to placard GVWR alongside AWR? What does GVWR mean to you exactly, or is it just useless information?
wilber1 09/19/16 08:50pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Why hasn't anyone released a HD truck with a Turbo V8?

There is still lots of room for improvement in current IC engines and with hybrids, there is always the question which IC engine do you use with the hybrid system. Even with plug in hybrids, once you get past the first 50 miles not towing (probably not more than 10 miles towing any kind of load), all the energy used is coming from the vehicle's fuel tank so IC engine efficiency is still a huge factor.
wilber1 09/19/16 05:09pm Tow Vehicles
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