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 > Your search for posts made by 'willald' found 289 matches.

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RE: Why I own a MH continued

...All of this talk about how bad we hate flying, definitely shows some good reasons to own an RV. No argument there. However, I'm not seeing how it makes or breaks the case necessarily, for owning a Motorhome over any other type of RV, like the subject of this thread suggests? Everything bad discussed here about flying commercial, could be completely avoided by traveling in almost any kind of RV. It doesn't necessarily have to be a motorized RV. A TT, 5th wheel, or even a truck camper could accomplish the same thing (and would be much more cost effective in some cases).
willald 02/25/15 02:15pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Downshifting fix for hills

It doesn't have to be fixed becaus it's not broken. The section of the computer that controls the shifting of the transmission, knows what it's doing..... Exactly right! Ford's torqueshift transmission, and computers that control it and the engine know what they are doing and they do it well. No need to fix something that is working exactly as designed, and working very well. Ford electronics will not let you over-rev and damage the V10 engine, its pretty well a bullet-proof drivetrain. My recommendation: Don't use the cruise control in the first place, especially not when towing a car. I quit using cruise control when driving RVs a looong time ago, back when we first started with various towable RVs. When an engine is working this hard, moving this much weight, cruise control is not a good idea in most cases, IMO. Much better to work the throttle yourself, that way you can anticipate various hills and give it some 'go' before getting to the hills. Keeps you more alert, too, as you need to be when driving something this big.
willald 02/25/15 02:08pm Class A Motorhomes
leaky AC compressor - 2012 F53 chassis

..Noticed last few times I had been under the MH doing various maintenance tasks, that there seemed to be some kind of oil on the AC compressor (dash air) on the front of the engine, near the bottom of it. Anyway, since the Ford 'bumper-to-bumper' warranty on the chassis was getting ready to end in a few weeks, yesterday I took it to the Ford dealer. Had them do regular service (oil change, chassis lube, 21 point inspection, etc), and check out the AC compressor. Well, lo and behold, they find that indeed the compressor is leaking oil, and needs to be replaced. They had to order the new compressor, it will be here in a few days. I'll bringing the MH back next week for them to install it. Best part: The entire repair bill ($1300 total), will be on Ford's dime, not mine! Had I waited just a few more weeks, the warranty would have ended, and I would have got to pay for that one. Woohooo, for ONCE, a warranty works out in MY favor, haha! Score one for the little guy. :) Anyway, guess the only point I have here is: Anyone with a Class A MH built on a later model Ford F53 chassis, you might wanna crawl under and have a look at the AC compressor on the front of your V10, check for any oil leakage. Preferably, before your warranty ends if it hasn't already. I am very, very glad I got this taken care of while it is still under warranty. Warranties normally don't work out this way for us, haha.
willald 02/24/15 11:16am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Toad Brake System (your opinion)

I was using the Ready Brake Elite, but when I traded the toad I wanted to be able to tow either of my vehicles and any future ones. We've used our Readybrake on two different vehicles. All you have to do when you trade or get another vehicle, is order and install the Readybrake cable on the new vehicle. They'll sell you just the cable for a 2nd vehicle for just $60. Once thats installed, you can tow either vehicle using the Readybrake without having to put anything in or take anything out every time. The simplicity of being able to use Readybrake on multiple vehicles so easily without having to wrestle anything in or out of the car every time, was actually one of the reasons we really like the Readybrake. Will and others, I have a new to me 2008 monaco monarch (gasser) and just picked up a used 1999 Vitara 4x4 auto trans for my toad. I'm shopping for tow bar and braking system. The Vitara is light, ~3,000 lbs. the ready brake system appears to me to be the most economical approach. Can anyone comment on the difficulty level for installation? I turn a decent wrench as a weekend warrior mechanic for simple jobs like oil change, disc brakes, etc. just don't want to get in over my head. Thanks for any input. Bill Bill, it really depends on the vehicle. All you're really doing is installing a physical cable from the brake pedal arm, through the firewall and up to the front of the vehicle. Thats really it. On vehicles where its not too crowded under the hood and you have access to run the cable, its a very easy installation. Jeep Wranglers are one vehicle where this is a very easy installation, from what I've seen. OTOH, on vehicles like my Ford Fusion hybrid where it is extremely 'crowded' under the hood, its a bit more difficult. I had a professional do the installation, and it took him a full day to do it on the Fusion. OTOH, our previous vehicle, a Kia minivan, it was done in just a couple hours. Look under the hood on your Suzuki, and around the front bumper. You'll probably be able to determine yourself, just how easy or difficult it may be. I'm going to guess with an older vehicle like you're talking about, it will probably be a pretty easy installation.
willald 02/22/15 11:06am Dinghy Towing
RE: Another question for serious help (advice), seriously

I don't know which class hitch it is, but the Hurricane features page list and 8000 lb hitch. http://i.imgur.com/wzLae6A.jpg (Don't you like it when they use asterisks but never explain them.) Tom That has to be a typo. :h Doesn't matter, none of the models weights will allow anything over 5k. It could be a 10k hitch but the max is still 4-5k depending on the model. Effy makes a good point here - You need to double check on that 8k hitch thing. That does not seem right at all. I'm thinking also, that this is a typo or some other kind of mistake. I don't know of any MH built recently that offers any more than a 5k hitch receiver on the back. I think you're going to find that only way you're going to get beyond the 5k limitation, is to step up to a diesel unit of some kind. That, or spend a bunch of $$ to try and beef up the 5k hitch receiver on the back of a gasser, but that opens up a whole 'nother can of worms.
willald 02/19/15 02:35pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Honda Odyssey

Yes, the ReadyBrute Elite solution does help to keep the price down. I don't know if that was available when I installed mine or not. But if I was looking for a system now, I'd look it over very closely. I've read many good reviews on these forums. What I liked best about our system is that the power brakes on the van are operating normally due to the vacuum pump on the brake system, rather than operating a "dead pedal" with no power assist. Readybrake sells a vacuum pump you can add to their brake system to get the same affect if you want it. However, as I and many others have learned, Readybrake in most cases really does not need that pump, as it is designed to be able to engage the brakes OK with or without any vacuum assist. I also like the visual/audible feedback in the motorhome whenever the brakes are applied on the Odyssey while towing. I like this, also. Fortunately, Readybrake includes an LED monitor kit as part of the package, that you install on your MH dash that gives you this visual feedback. They provide instructions to wire it to come on when the brake actuator moves, but you can also wire it to your towed vehicle, to come on when brakes are applied (many of us have done this, it gives better feedback that way). And I can adjust their application with a slight twist of a knob, if need be. Yep, this is the one thing you get with systems like RVI, SMI, BrakeBuddy, etc. that Readybrake doesn't give you - the ability to adjust it from the MH dashboard. You pay an awful high price for that, though, like you said. Will
willald 02/19/15 12:03pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Honda Odyssey

Get a 2004. :) Then you'll need a baseplate, tow bar, safety cables, brake system and lights. Figure $2000-ish. To tow the Odyssey there is a prescribed pre-tow sequence. If you need that, let me know and I'll post that too. Tranny fluid should also be changed at an accelerated interval since the odometer does not record towed miles. ~Rick I assume with the $2000 figure, you are talking about self-installation? If not, let me know where you can get all that for that price including installation. ..If you go with something like Readybrake's ReadyBrute Elite tow bar system that includes both tow bar AND braking sytem all in one package for around $1k....Yes, it might well be possible to get it all done, including professional installation, for around $2000.
willald 02/19/15 09:53am Dinghy Towing
RE: I need some serious help (advice), seriously

...So, my question is this: do I tell the salesman to forget installing the tow bar and go to another dealer to get my RBE or do I forget the RBE and go with the Roadmaster? Yeah, I'd tell the salesman that you understand that his job is to sell his own brand and bash ones that he has no clue about, but you would still prefer the ReadyBrute Elite tow bar (with included ReadyBrake system). At least, thats what I would tell him. :) If they won't get such for you, or won't install it, then yes, go to another dealer. You can order the ReadyBrute Elite with everything you need, HERE, from HitchSource.com for $1100 (with free shipping). You can also order your base plates from them (HitchSource) at the same time, if you want (ReadyBrake will give you adapters to work with any base plate you chose). Any other tow bar of similar quality will cost you close to that much, then you would STILL have to spend another bunch of $$ (as much as $1k or more) for the braking system on top of that. Readybrute is soooo much less expensive when you're buying it all up front, its almost ridiculous anyone buys anything else. I'd just order the ReadyBrute tow bar, base plates, and wiring kit yourself. Then, find you a dealer willing to do the install, if you can't or don't want to do the install yourself. If that dealer won't, then, yes, find another one. Either way, you should stick with your initial decision for the Readybrake, it was/is a great choice. Don't let one dealer talk you out of it, just because they make more $$ or have more experience with something else that is nowhere near as good.
willald 02/18/15 12:39pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Breaking System

For two toads, the ReadyBrake is still a good choice. A "second car" extra cable harness kit is only $77. Exactly. I have the Readybrake cable/harness installed on both of our two everyday driving vehicles (Kia minivan and Ford Fusion hybrid), can tow either one of them easily with Readybrake. No need to put anything in or take anything out when switching between the two. Much easier than any brak-in-a-box system. Will What brand base plates are you using with these two vehicles? Blue Ox, on both of them. Will
willald 02/18/15 12:18pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Breaking System

For two toads, the ReadyBrake is still a good choice. A "second car" extra cable harness kit is only $77. Exactly. I have the Readybrake cable/harness installed on both of our two everyday driving vehicles (Kia minivan and Ford Fusion hybrid), can tow either one of them easily with Readybrake. No need to put anything in or take anything out when switching between the two. Much easier than any brak-in-a-box system. Will
willald 02/18/15 11:11am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Breaking System

Here's one more vote for the Readybrake system. Just can't beat it, IMO.
willald 02/17/15 11:45am Class A Motorhomes
RE: leveler/stabilizer

The more you extend your leveling jacks, the less stable the RV will feel inside. This is especially true if you lift high enough to bring a wheel or two off the ground. On the flipside, the less you extend the jacks (use more blocks), the more rock solid it will feel inside. Next time before you deploy the jacks, try putting some large blocks under your jacks before extending them, so they don't have to extend as far. If you have to lift enough to take a tire off the ground, drive that tire, side up on blocks first to prevent such. You may well find that using more blocks and raising the jacks less, results in a more stable RV inside. I have. Tires help provide lateral stability when parked, so the more weight you keep on them when parked, the more stable, solid the RV will feel. Thats why its not a good idea to lift one off the ground unless absolutely necessary. Yes, diesel pushers have an advantage when it comes to leveling, since they can dump air and bring the coach down very low before extending jacks to level. End result from this means that the coach sits lower, jacks not having to extend as far. Thats why they can be more stable when parked. I've found over the years, that people frequently get very lazy when it comes to leveling, when they move up to a Motorhome. Its as if the leveling blocks they used for years without a problem with towable RVs, suddenly become something they just HATE to have to use. Don't be that way, haha. :) This answer, without a doubt, is by far, one of the most accurate answers to any given leveling situation out there, in the real world. I applaud all of it........ Thanks, Scott. Glad to see we agree on this matter. :) Some gas coaches, with ALL the tires still on the ground and, the jacks deployed, will still exhibit a slight "rocking"..... I think thats more about the owners and what they do inside, than it is about the coach itself. You see, us gasser owners are more often going to be younger 'working stiffs' like me that can't afford to spend six figures on a diesel pusher. And, us younger folks...Wellll, lets just say we're more likely and apt to participate in certain 'activities' in our RV that might cause the RV to exhibit a slight "rocking" if you know what I mean. ;) Thats the REAL reason I have to use a lot of blocks, and go to long ends to get our rig as stable as possible, Scott. Hahahahaha. :) Happy camping. Will
willald 02/17/15 11:39am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Looking for Fishing Pole Storage Soulutions

I use 4" pvc pipe mounted to the top of the storage area with metal straps. Each will hold 3 or 4 rods up to the reel which sticks out the end. Works really well. Sorry no pics, tt is in hibernation. This is what I did as well, but I used a large piece of square shaped fence post cover you buy at Lowe's or Home Depot. Works great, provides a great way to store several various poles we take with us as well as fishing rods.
willald 02/17/15 08:16am Class A Motorhomes
RE: leveler/stabilizer

The more you extend your leveling jacks, the less stable the RV will feel inside. This is especially true if you lift high enough to bring a wheel or two off the ground. On the flipside, the less you extend the jacks (use more blocks), the more rock solid it will feel inside. Next time before you deploy the jacks, try putting some large blocks under your jacks before extending them, so they don't have to extend as far. If you have to lift enough to take a tire off the ground, drive that tire, side up on blocks first to prevent such. You may well find that using more blocks and raising the jacks less, results in a more stable RV inside. I have. Tires help provide lateral stability when parked, so the more weight you keep on them when parked, the more stable, solid the RV will feel. Thats why its not a good idea to lift one off the ground unless absolutely necessary. Yes, diesel pushers have an advantage when it comes to leveling, since they can dump air and bring the coach down very low before extending jacks to level. End result from this means that the coach sits lower, jacks not having to extend as far. Thats why they can be more stable when parked. I've found over the years, that people frequently get very lazy when it comes to leveling, when they move up to a Motorhome. Its as if the leveling blocks they used for years without a problem with towable RVs, suddenly become something they just HATE to have to use. Don't be that way, haha. :)
willald 02/17/15 07:21am Class A Motorhomes
RE: shortest tag axle class A?

Thanks for getting us back to tag axles. Will you are incorrect on towing most tag axle DP's from the front. The amount of weight on the tag is determined by the amount of air in it's air bags which is controlled by it's own pressure regulator. Raising the front up will make the regulator release air maintaining it's preset pressure/weight on the tag. I would remove the drive shaft instead of the drive axle shafts for fear of hitting it with the tag axle. ..From what I understand from those that have towed a tag axle DP that way and later regretted it, it wasn't damage to the suspension that was the concern. It was damage done to the tag axle tires from overloading them when it was towed that way. They ended up buying a new set of tires shortly afterward. Perhaps my choice of words initially was incorrect - It isn't axle damage really, but more tire overloading damage concerns. You make a good point, though - Perhaps on some units, enough air can be removed on the tag axle, so that it would not shoulder too much weight in the event of being towed by the front. That definitely was not the case, though, for the folks I talked to that got to buy a new set of tires as a result of that tow. Will
willald 02/16/15 02:01pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: shortest tag axle class A?

One thing to keep in mind about a tag axle, which is one reason I never want anything to do with one: Towing one, should it ever become necessary, is much, much more difficult and expensive with a tag axle DP than one without a tag. In most cases, you cannot pick it up by the front like you do with any other MH. Doing so puts too much weight on the rear tag axle and can damage it. Picking it up by the rear usually isn't a good idea, either, as this puts too much weight on the front axle. Frequently, the only option is to put it on a huge flatbed (low boy) trailer. This can be extremely expensive, and much, much harder to find a towing service capable of handling this. Especially if you break down a good ways off the beaten path. Yes, Coachnet or Good Sam ERS will cover all (or at least most) of this expense if you have such. However, it can be much, much more difficult to find a towing service that has the equipment, know-how to handle a huge rig like this on a flatbed.
willald 02/16/15 12:18pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-Venturi Generator Exhaust Extender Ideas

I have a Georgetown, and same predicament as the original poster - Generator and its exhaust is located underneath the living room slideout. Did not like it at first, but have since learned that it really is no big deal. I researched this same subject also, considered fabricating something, or getting a Genturi and extension like Lantley discussed. Also seriously considered taking it to an exhaust shop and having them re-route the generator exhaust back a few feet so it'd come out just behind the slideout (this was my preferred solution, although we never did it). Then, one time, when we were 'driveway camping' with the MH at some relative's house and needed to run the genny all night to have air conditioner, etc., I just said what the heck - we have a good CO detector, and there was not anybody outside around us that could be harmed. We just went ahead and ran the generator all night just like it is. No Genturi, no exhaust extensions, nothing. I was very nervous about it that first night, but guess what? It worked just fine. CO detector never went off, was not a problem at all. Since then, we have done that several times, and it works just fine. Kids actually like it, say the generator's humming helps them go to sleep. That, and it combines two of their favorite things - camping, and staying at Grandparents house. :) You definitely need to make sure your CO detector is in good working order. I also always make sure the rubber seals around the slideout are in good shape, too, whenever we do this (both things you should do, regardless). Maybe before trying this, you might want to do a test - open the slideout, crank up the generator and let it run for a few hours. See if CO detector ever goes off inside the MH. If fumes are able to get in somewhere around the floor, better to know now rather than when out camping and you have to bail in the middle of the night. If CO detector does go off or you smell exhaust inside, then you can look at maybe doing some of the exhaust ideas being discussed here. You may well just find like I did, though, that this really is not as big an issue as it may seem. If you do decide to do something about this, my preference would be to have an exhaust shop re-route the exhaust away from the slide, at which point you can either use a Genturi or fabricate something of your own like it.
willald 02/16/15 06:33am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Toad Brake System (your opinion)

I was using the Ready Brake Elite, but when I traded the toad I wanted to be able to tow either of my vehicles and any future ones. We've used our Readybrake on two different vehicles. All you have to do when you trade or get another vehicle, is order and install the Readybrake cable on the new vehicle. They'll sell you just the cable for a 2nd vehicle for just $60. Once thats installed, you can tow either vehicle using the Readybrake without having to put anything in or take anything out every time. The simplicity of being able to use Readybrake on multiple vehicles so easily without having to wrestle anything in or out of the car every time, was actually one of the reasons we really like the Readybrake.
willald 02/10/15 08:43am Dinghy Towing
RE: Talk about dodging a BULLET !!!

FYI...here's how mine is mounted....yours may be different but suggest it's mounted to something that won't come off the car....Dennis http://i.imgur.com/5V6DOefl.jpg Nice, I like it, Dennis. Even though this isn't really how the instructions tell you to install it, it really is the best approach. As long as that Readystop unit there doesn't break loose with whatever separates from the towed vehicle, that approach will always work, and will grab and hold the brakes in the event of a separation. Even if entire front end rips off like what happened here. I admit, my Readystop is mounted up on the front, just below the base plate. I may just have to re-locate it. Been fixin' to change the way the Readybrake cable is routed, anyway..
willald 02/05/15 09:29pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Toad Brake System (your opinion)

...the one most talk about is the Ready Brute with the ReadyBrake system. It's a surge brake that is attached to the tow bar and when you slow down, pressure is applied to the surge brake which in turn pulls a cable attached to your brake pedal. The cable is permanently attached and only takes moments to connect. I think it's one of the best, but in my opinion loses it's effectiveness once the air in the power booster is depleted. It needs an air pump. NSA does offer an optional vacuum pump for the ReadyBrake that maintains a "live" brake booster. It's easy to test and see if one would be effective on a given toad before buying it. Just run a predetermined course with a variety of stops using the standard ReadyBrake setup, and then run the same course with the toad engine running at idle to maintain the vacuum booster. If the difference is noticeable, add the pump. ..To add onto that: On some vehicles like Ford's hybrids, (our Ford Fusion hybrid being one example), power braking is on ALL the time, even when engine, ignition is off. That being the case, the power booster is never depleted, so the Readybrake never loses any effectiveness like DSP Don alludes to. No need for a separate, optional vacuum pump in this case. Our previous vehicle we flat towed, a Kia Sedona minivan, did not have this. And, yes, once the air in the power booster depleted, the Readybrake had to pull harder on the cable to engage the brakes. However, the Readybrake actuator is designed to handle this, and I found it did fine, with the power braking (currently with Fusion) or without (previously, on the Kia van). I agree with Dutch, its a good idea to run the test he described, to see if the pump is worth adding or not. You may or may not notice enough difference to be worth it. I did not. Will
willald 02/05/15 02:01pm Dinghy Towing
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