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 > Your search for posts made by 'willald' found 263 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Seat Belts

My front seat passenger is belted along with the driver. Everyone else is up to me to decide when and whether to get belted...just like in an aircraft..turbulence, the seat belt light comes on, severe clear, it's off.......Dennis Someone, please pass the popcorn.....:)...D This is pretty much the same rules we use, but I generally require that everyone be belted in, any/all the time they are sitting at a seat that has a seatbelt. I installed a seatbelt on the recliner behind the passenger seat, so pretty much all seats have a seatbelt, except the rear-facing side of the dinette. As I recall, the law only requires that the person in the driver and passenger seat be belted in. And, yes, Dennis, you're right, pass the popcorn, get a cold drink, sit back and watch the fun. This topic ALWAYS generates lots of entertaining 'discussion'. :) You'll notice, folks that own towable RVs are always very adament in these discussions, saying that EVERYONE must be belted in ALL the time, and should NEVER get up for anything when RV is moving. Ever. But, you watch, one day when those folks trade up to a MH and see how nice it is to have all the amenities when on the road...Suddenly their opinion on this matter changes drastically. :)
willald 04/28/15 10:56am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Flat tire 36 hrs after I purchased new

Anyway, sounds like your tire is probably fine. You caught it and took care of it before any damage was done (good job!) I'd also say that the place that sold, installed the new tires probably is not at fault here - your valve extension is. JMO, but next thing I'd do is dump those extensions. If you must use extensions, only use ones that are 'airless'. Meaning, there is no air pressure in them except when you put a gauge or air hose on it. Even better would be dually valves. Thats what I use, and would highly recommend. Politetly disagree----The tire shop is responsible for installing new and/or checking all valve stems and extensions, mounting tires, correctly torqueing all lug nuts and finally checking all tires and stems for any air leakage before the RV leaves the tire shop. Agreed, but what evidence is there, that the valve stem extension was loose when it left the tire shop? I have personally experienced one of those extensions being tight when heading out, but getting knocked loose by road debris when on the road. It CAN happen, and does. Seems unlikely tire shop would have left it loose, but who knows. Anyway, its all a moot point, as the matter has been taken care of, and the dealer is agreeing to make sure there is no damage, which is great. Will
willald 04/27/15 05:39pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Do you drain your hot water tank?

When we had a TT and nobody would use or need water in the TT until we got to our destination, yes, I drained the water heater after every trip. Was easy to do, increased life of the anode rod in the water heater, and was that much less weight we were moving down the road. It was kind of a pain, though, 'cause it meant that before every trip, had to get the big 'air bubble' out of the system, when water heater filled back up. When we moved up to a Motorhome, things changed. Since we need hot water when on the road (for washing hands, etc), it was too much of a 'PITA' to have to fill that water heater back up and get the air bubble out before we left for every trip. Soo, now I only empty it at the end of the season when winterizing. It stays full all during the season. Yes, it will sit for a few weeks between trips, but we have not noticed any kind of bad smell yet. Does probably mean that I'll replace the anode rod a little more often, but the rod still looks good, after 3 seasons of camping.
willald 04/27/15 09:20am General RVing Issues
RE: Flat tire 36 hrs after I purchased new

We had something very similar to this happen to us a few years ago, and it was the reason why I quit using any kind of valve extension that is not 'airless'. Those things can and do work loose, and the air leaks out. Like you, it almost cost me a tire. In my case, some kind of road debris hit the valve extension just right, and worked it loose. Got to campground with a very flat tire and loose valve extension. Good Sam ERS came out, took off and dismounted the tire, examined it inside and out for damage. Found none, so they re-mounted it, aired it back up, removed that valve extension, and tire was/is fine to this day. Not long after that, I dumped all those valve extensions, and went with Dually valve stem replacements. Anyway, sounds like your tire is probably fine. You caught it and took care of it before any damage was done (good job!) I'd also say that the place that sold, installed the new tires probably is not at fault here - your valve extension is. JMO, but next thing I'd do is dump those extensions. If you must use extensions, only use ones that are 'airless'. Meaning, there is no air pressure in them except when you put a gauge or air hose on it. Even better would be dually valves. Thats what I use, and would highly recommend.
willald 04/27/15 09:05am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Leaving tomorrow for Fla

If you are taking 295 bypass around Jacksonville, stay at Flamingo Lake Campground... right off 295, easy off & on, clean, nice sites, nice people... we have stayed there 4 nights as transients......don't need to unhook, they have a snack bar/café, food is good..... When we took that route to Florida, we considered Flamingo Lake, also. It is a nice place, but its really more of a 'destination' type of campground than a stopover. Its a bit pricey if you're just stopping for one night to rest. We found a much better, and less expensive option was just a few miles north of that, just before you cross into Florida. Last exit in Georgia, exit #1, There is Country Oaks campground right off the interstate. Very simple, family owned campground located conveniently right off the interstate. Their rates are considerably less than Flamingo Lake (nearly half). Several nice pull-thru sites you can get where you won't even have to unhook (we didn't). There is also a KOA at the same exit, if thats what you like. There's a large truck stop/fuel station at the same exit, too, which is a good place to fill up on fuel before you hit the road the next morning (thats what we did). My thoughts were/are, why pay more for all the nice amenities a place like Flamingo Lake or the KOA has, when you're not going to use any of those amenities, and just going to rest for one night? Seems like a waste of $$. We stayed at Country Oaks on the way to and from Florida, and will probably stay there again any time we take that route. Now, if you plan to stay for a couple days in that area around Jacksonville, Flamingo Lake would be a good choice.
willald 04/24/15 06:31am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Leaving tomorrow for Fla

We just made that route down to Florida from NC. Was at Sanibel Island, Florida for a week, first week of April. Was incredible down there, wish we could have stayed longer! As already said, I-95 through SC is a pretty rough road, not very smooth at all. It will wear on you, and shake anything lose in your coach thats not bolted down, haha. The day you are coming through SC, I would not plan on more than 400 miles that day. Preferably more like 300 or 350. The trip was about 730 miles for us. We did it in 2 days, split the trip in half by stopping near Kingsland, Georgia on the way there and the way back. Like already said, there are tons of places to stop along I-95 on that route, don't worry about that. JMO, but I'd try to split the trip up more evenly, do maybe 400 miles or so each day. 600 miles in one day is too much, IMO. Especially on that stretch of I-95. Along that stretch of I-95, you can count on there being several traffic bottlenecks, hold-ups, etc. that will turn what you expect to be 8 hours on the road, into more like 9 or 10. There was one point in Florida on I-75 where it got so bad, I jumped off the interstate on a 'whim' and followed route 301 for a good ways. Ended up being quicker, too. A good GPS is a very useful tool when you want to take the 'scenic route' like that. :)
willald 04/22/15 02:04pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Best toad braking system

If you haven't got a tow bar yet, I highly, highly recommend the NSA ReadyBrute Elite tow bar and Readybrake unit. You get a very nice tow bar AND one of the best braking systems there is, Readybrake, all for 'bout the same price as you'd pay for just a tow bar alone from anyone else. You just can't beat it, IMO. Simple, no-nonsense, no electronics, cable-operated braking system that simply works. Does not require tapping into electrical or brake system of your toad at all. Nothing to install or take out each time you tow, just hook up the cable at the front of the car and go. If you get the package deal like I mentioned above, it will end up saving you over $1k from what you'd pay for most anything else. ..And, most anything that could break on it, is so simple and easy to repair, you could do so with parts found at any hardware store for less than $20. No other system gives you that simplicity. Only system that would be better, although that 'better' comes at a very high price: A system like M&G or SMI Air Force One, that works directly off your coach's air brake system. Thats only an option, though, if you have a diesel pusher coach that has full air brakes.
willald 04/22/15 07:35am Dinghy Towing
RE: Tire valve extender

If you must use extenders, make sure you only get ones that are the 'airless' type. Meaning, there is no air pressure in them, except when you put a gauge or air hose on it. That way, there is no risk of your tire leaking air if the extender works loose (because they can and will). Any other kind of extender that has air pressure in it all the time, and you are asking for trouble, IMO. Been there, done that - Had one of those extenders knocked loose by road debris and leaked out all the air in the tire. Almost cost me a tire, had I not caught it quickly and taken care of it (thank you, Good Sam Roadside service!!) A much, much better solution, is the complete replacement vales, dually valves, like already mentioned. More expensive, and more work to install, as tires have to be dismounted since its a complete valve stem replacement. But, they make checking, topping off the tires much, MUCH easier, both inner and outer. I have the dually valves, and I can check, inflate ALL the tires on MH and all our other vehicles with the same, simple digital tire gauge. No need for a special truck tire gauge. And, I never have to worry about a valve stem leaking ever again. :)
willald 04/22/15 06:43am Class A Motorhomes
RE: LP gas tank extension question

Thanks for all the suggestions, responses. All very good info. :) Well, think I've pretty well decided that I'm going to go with an 11 lb. separate gas bottle. It is just small enough so that it will fit down in the large pot we bring also for this, as I mentioned in the previous post. However, one thing is bugging me, that I'm wondering about: Is it risky, dangerous, for an LP gas bottle to be stored, transported inside a large, metal pot? My concern is that if the tank 'vents' out some gas, the gas will tend to settle at the bottom of the pot. Wondering if the gas bottle shifting around a little in the pot, and it being metal on metal, if it might generate a spark, and.....kaboom. Or, am I being overly paranoid? Should I maybe make some kind of sleeve, cover for the LP gas bottle that it will fit in to reduce chance of sparks, before putting it in the pot? I know they make covers, containers for gas bottles, but I've not found any that will fit the smaller 11 lb size; they all are made for the more common 20 lb bottles. A 20 lb bottle is too big for what I want to do here.
willald 04/21/15 06:10pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Braking System - Stay-In-Play Duo?

X3 on the Readybrake, its all I've ever used or will use. Just can't beat it, IMO - Costs significantly less than all the others, provides a simple, reliable braking system with no electronics, nothing to have to put in or take out every time you tow, and no need to tap into any part of your vehicles' electrical system or brakes. And, most anything that can break on it, you can easily repair yourself with parts found at any hardware store for less than $20. Readybrake is the only system that gives you that simplicity. Oh, and if you ever sell or trade your towed vehicle, you can order a new Readybrake cable for the new vehicle, for just $60. Sooo, Readybrake can be used with multiple vehicles very easily. If you haven't bought a tow bar yet, you can get ReadyBrake's ReadyBrute Elite tow bar package, that includes both a tow bar AND their Readybrake system all in one package deal, for 'bout the same as you'd pay for just a tow bar from anyone else. That can save you over $1k from what you'd pay for many other systems, including the SMI.
willald 04/20/15 10:23am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Compare and Contrast TT's and 5er's

One thing that has changed, in the comparison between these two in the last decade or two: Handling, towing stability when on the road is not really a factor anymore, with the high end hitches now availalbe for TTs (Hensley Arrow, Pullrite, Propride 3P). These hitches make a TT handle pretty much the same as a 5er if not better in some cases due to the somewhat lower center of gravity. Sooo, really, the decision comes down to all the other factors - basement storage vs pickup bed use, amenities, floorplan differences (steps vs no steps), backing characteristics of each, tow vehicle choice, etc. We towed TTs for many, many years, and noticed first hand the night and day different in towing, stability, when using one of the high end hitches with it. Also have rode several times with BIL who owns a large 5th wheel, so I know how they handle, too. If we ever went back to a towable RV, I think I truly could be happy with either, not real sure which way we'd go. Like so many other things, each one has its own set of pros and cons.
willald 04/20/15 06:57am General RVing Issues
RE: Concerned over ACME Tow Dolley Straps

Will, the placement of the straps is my major concern. The "new and improved" straps that come with the dolley now are not adjustable. The cross-straps are actually sewn to the side pieces so we cannot position them as we would like to. I wish they were adjustable because that would solve my problem. I wonder why they changed to this new non-adjustable strap?? Ahh, I did not realize they changed the design of the straps, and that the new ones are no longer adjustable. That sucks, and pretty much blows a lot of the advice I gave you out of the water. :( You might try calling ACME, see if they can still can get the old style straps, that were adjustable. If you can get your hands on a set of those, you might be able to do better. Wbwood is probably right, though: The way you have them now, as long as you can get and keep the straps tight, will probably work OK. Oh, and to a previous poster that said the tires cannot come off the straps: Ohhh, yes they can. Been there, done that. Had it happen once, where one tire came completely out of the straps. Fortunately the straps on the other tire, as well as the beefed up, shorter chains I was uinsg still kept the car in place on the dolly. It wasn't long after that happened, that our ACME dolly was sold on Craigs list, and we went to flat towing. :) Wow, that had to be scarey when you realized that you lost a strap. We ordered an extra set when we purchased the dolley so we would be prepared, just in case. Oh, we didn't lose the strap, it was still there on the dolly. It just wasn't on the tire anymore. Yep, we bought a 2nd set of straps after that, too. Never used those new straps, but they did make it easier to sell the dolly Craigs list, having a brand new set of straps I was including in the deal. Yes, was not happy when I found the tire sitting free, out of the strap. Made me very glad I had beefed up and shortened the chains from dolly to the car, they are what held it in place on that side. :) In the tire straps' defense, though: That was one of first times we towed it a long distance, and I was still learning with the straps, didn't really have them on right. Thats why one worked loose. After that, once I figured out what I was doing with the straps, never had one come off the tire again. Will
willald 04/19/15 08:00pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Brake Buddy Advantage Select and Fusion Hybrids

Not sure 'bout the Brake Buddy Advantage, but one thing to keep in mind with your Fusion Hybrid: Power (vacuum) braking is on ALL the time, even when ignition is off. That means, it is on whenever you are towing it, too. You need to make sure whatever braking system you get, will work OK with power braking on, and that this will not cause it to over-brake your Fusion and burn up the brakes. I use the Readybrake braking system with our Fusion Hybrid, and it works great with it. Also, with the Fusion Hybrids, regardless of braking system you use, make sure you run a charge line to the Fusion's battery. If you don't, you'll run the battery down within a few hours of towing, and will need a jump start when you get to your destination.
willald 04/19/15 07:52pm Dinghy Towing
RE: ?? 6 or 12 VOLT BATTERY ??

This is bad advice. You can also use 'drinking' water for this, that also is sold in grocery stores by the gallon. Perhaps, but we've been doing it for years, have never had a problem, yet. :) I agree, though, that distilled water is better if you can find it. Sometimes you cannot, though, and drinking water will work, and is better than letting a battery cell run dry. Will
willald 04/17/15 09:24am General RVing Issues
RE: ?? 6 or 12 VOLT BATTERY ??

Where can you but distilled water? The 6 volt Golf Car batteries would need to be in a vented area when charging and discharging? Yes, distilled water can be bought at any grocery store. You typically buy it by the gallon, for maybe $1 or $2 a gallon. You can also use 'drinking' water for this, that also is sold in grocery stores by the gallon. Yes, the batteries will off-gas/vent hydrogen gas when charging. That hydrogen gas needs to vent out, you don't want it being concealed in with the batteries. Have heard of explosions being caused that way. Sooo, definitely vent them, somehow.
willald 04/17/15 08:52am General RVing Issues
RE: Ready Brake users

.....I guess it depends if your toad has separate turn signals or not. The CRV does and my goal was to make the back end look and operate the same way as if I was driving it. I didn't want to run an additional wire under the RV and I wanted a charge line too. That put me at the 6 pin connector instead of the 4 pin connector. The bonus was the 6th line, which I used for the brake signal. There was a fair amount of cutting and splicing but in the end I think it was worth the effort. My approach would work the same, regardless whether the toad has separate turn signals or not. How you wire the tail lights of the toad is not really related to how this part of the wiring for the brake light LED indicator is done. I ran a charge line as well (have to have it, for the Fusion hybrid). Again, that is separate from the wiring I described above, to make the LED indicator work. I had to use a 6 pin cord, connector as well. I only used one wire from the trailer light unit's 4 flat connector, and ran that wire back up to the front of the toad, connected it to one of the lines in the 6 round connector (did not use the other 3 wires on the flat 4 connector). Sorry, probably should have made that more clear. I just re-read your post, and realized that you utilized an existing wire in your MH for the brake controller to connect up the LED to show you when brakes are engaged. Avoiding having to run a separate wire under the MH (good idea!) You could just as easily have done that approach with the method I described. Only difference would be in how you did the wiring on the toad itself. Will
willald 04/17/15 07:58am Dinghy Towing
RE: Ready Brake users

Lots of good ideas here. I'll add one more. I just wired up my 2010 Honda CRV for toad duty. The Ready Brake is pulling the brake pedal, of course, so the car would be turning on the brake lights at the same time the RV is sending a brake light signal too. I cut the hot side of the brake light wire at the switch and added a relay. Roadmaster has this in a kit form but wants $20 to $30 for it. You can make the same thing from Amazon for less than $15. The Roadmaster kit "connects" the brake light switch to the stock wiring when the relay is on. I didn't like that either so I went with the fail safe method. When the relay is off the brake light switch is connected to the stock wiring. The relay I used is a DPDT 30 AMP unit. When the relay is on, the brake light switch is disconnected from the stock wiring but is connected to the other output on the relay. I set my car up with 6 pin socket, 4 for the lights, one for the charge line and 1 for the electric brake line. I don't need electric brakes on the car. My RV doesn't have an elelctric brake controller. I sent the output from the relay (when it's on) down the wire that is normally associated with the electric brakes. Under the dashboard of the RV I found the wire and added a T tap and a LED light. When the car is setup to be towed there is a switch that not only turns on the relay but also disconnects the fuse that we Honda CRV owners have to pull. The outout of the brake light switch now goes to the dashboard indicator in the RV. I can see if the brakes are working or sticking. Fred I agree that its a really good idea to have the warning indicator on your MH dashboard be powered directly off your toad's brake pedal, instead off from the Readybrake Actuator. However, I found a way to do such with much, much less intrusion on the car's electrical system. I did it this way: Purchased a trailer light wiring isolation kit/unit like THIS one. Installed it in trunk of car (under a panel), and wired it to the battery (using included fuse) and ground like instructions indicate. Then, run eithr the left or right turn wire (either will work) from the flat four connector of this unit, to the wire going back to the MH's LED indicator on the dash. Then, connect the red stop light sensor wire from this unit to the wire going to brake lights on car's tail light, using one of the provided wire taps. Make sure you tap into your car's brake light wire, BEFORE that wire goes into any diode you may have installed when doing your other taillight wiring. Thats it, you're done. Now, any time brake pedal is engaged, pressed on toad vehilce, the LED indicator on your MH dash will light up. Beauty of this approach is, it keeps your wiring to the MH LED indicator totally isolated from your toad vehicle, and is much less intrusive on the toad's electrical system. If there's ever a short in the wire going to the LED, all it will do (at most) is trip the fuse included in this trailer wiring kit. Will not damage anything in the toad's electrical system, nor blow any fuses in the toad. Also, I found it much easier to access the necessary wiring in the trunk and rear tail lights for this appraoch, than it would have been to tap into any wiring, relays around the brake pedal inside the toad. Very interesting. You still have to run a line from the front of the RV to the back of the RV? Then to the car? Oh, yeah, you have to do that regardless, if you're going to use an LED indicator on the MH dash, to show you what the toad brakes are doing. Will
willald 04/16/15 05:03pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Ready Brake users

Lots of good ideas here. I'll add one more. I just wired up my 2010 Honda CRV for toad duty. The Ready Brake is pulling the brake pedal, of course, so the car would be turning on the brake lights at the same time the RV is sending a brake light signal too. I cut the hot side of the brake light wire at the switch and added a relay. Roadmaster has this in a kit form but wants $20 to $30 for it. You can make the same thing from Amazon for less than $15. The Roadmaster kit "connects" the brake light switch to the stock wiring when the relay is on. I didn't like that either so I went with the fail safe method. When the relay is off the brake light switch is connected to the stock wiring. The relay I used is a DPDT 30 AMP unit. When the relay is on, the brake light switch is disconnected from the stock wiring but is connected to the other output on the relay. I set my car up with 6 pin socket, 4 for the lights, one for the charge line and 1 for the electric brake line. I don't need electric brakes on the car. My RV doesn't have an elelctric brake controller. I sent the output from the relay (when it's on) down the wire that is normally associated with the electric brakes. Under the dashboard of the RV I found the wire and added a T tap and a LED light. When the car is setup to be towed there is a switch that not only turns on the relay but also disconnects the fuse that we Honda CRV owners have to pull. The outout of the brake light switch now goes to the dashboard indicator in the RV. I can see if the brakes are working or sticking. Fred I agree that its a really good idea to have the warning indicator on your MH dashboard be powered directly off your toad's brake pedal, instead off from the Readybrake Actuator. However, I found a way to do such with much, much less intrusion on the car's electrical system. I did it this way: Purchased a trailer light wiring isolation kit/unit like THIS one. Installed it in trunk of car (under a panel), and wired it to the battery (using included fuse) and ground like instructions indicate. Then, run eithr the left or right turn wire (either will work) from the flat four connector of this unit, to the wire going back to the MH's LED indicator on the dash. Then, connect the red stop light sensor wire from this unit to the wire going to brake lights on car's tail light, using one of the provided wire taps. Make sure you tap into your car's brake light wire, BEFORE that wire goes into any diode you may have installed when doing your other taillight wiring. Thats it, you're done. Now, any time brake pedal is engaged, pressed on toad vehilce, the LED indicator on your MH dash will light up. Beauty of this approach is, it keeps your wiring to the MH LED indicator totally isolated from your toad vehicle, and is much less intrusive on the toad's electrical system. If there's ever a short in the wire going to the LED, all it will do (at most) is trip the fuse included in this trailer wiring kit. Will not damage anything in the toad's electrical system, nor blow any fuses in the toad. Also, I found it much easier to access the necessary wiring in the trunk and rear tail lights for this appraoch, than it would have been to tap into any wiring, relays around the brake pedal inside the toad.
willald 04/16/15 02:45pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Fly or Drive?: 2500 miles from NW to Carolina's in June

Then your vehicle has a cooling issue Not necessarily. I have had perfectly healthy vehicles have this problem in extreme conditions. Perfectly healthy vehicles, from what year? 1972, or 1973? :) I also remember this being an issue on older vehicles from the 70s and 80s with big block V8s and/or cooling systems that were not designed well. However, I have NOT seen or heard of any vehicles having this issue, that were built in the last decade or so (unless there was something wrong, like a malfunctioning cooling fan, clogged radiator, etc). Regardless what you decide, don't let the (incorrect) comments about RV traveling in the South Sorry, but experience has dictated these comments are not incorrect. I have traveled many times through the DC area in multiple vehicle types. On multiple occasions due to extreme heat and extreme traffic with perfectly fine vehicles it has been necessary to shut down the a/c to avoid the engine overheating. If there's a TT or 5'er involved a generator is totally irrelevant. If you look at the original poster's signature/profile, you will see that he owns a Motorhome, not a TT or 5er. Sooo, I doubt shutting off his overheard air conditioners will ever be necessary to help the chassis engine cool off. :) Will
willald 04/16/15 02:09pm General RVing Issues
RE: LP gas tank extension question

I hooked up an extendastay, and ran an 8' hose across the RV into a passenger side compartment. From there, I've another extendastay T hooked up, and can connect 2 hoses to 2 different gas grilles/appliances. ..Aside from the concern Lantley brought up about someone tripping over the long hose you run from the MH for this, another issue I have with tapping into MH's permanent tank, more I think about it: If you run yourself out of LP gas using your cooker, grill, or whatever, you've now also used up your MH's supply of gas for heat, hot water, stove/oven, etc. Now, you have to break camp and drive that big MH who-knows-where in unfamilar territory to get the tank refilled. Not something I ever want to do. I prefer to fill up the MH tank at my convenience at home, where I know of a place close by that has plenty of room for me to get it in and out of. With a smaller, separate bottle, you leave the MH's gas supply alone, and if you run the separate bottle out, you can just throw it in the trunk of a car (toad), and easily take it where ever you need to go to get it filled. I like that much better, more I think about it. Tapping off the fridge won't work. Most grilles need high pressure propane from before the coaches regulator. Ditto for many Fleetwoods which have a tap, but it is low pressure and basically worthless. Yep, I knew fridge line is low pressure and wouldnt work, when I saw someone mention that earlier. If you're going to use the MH's tank for something like this, you're going to have to run a separate line from the tank.
willald 04/16/15 01:45pm Class A Motorhomes
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