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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: wheel bearings

First a comment on RV Professionals, I have not found one yet, ok that is my rant. It depends on the type of wheel bearing. The below is from another post of mine. If you do not have an oil bath bearing or a hub bearing you many find this useful. I saved all my tools, learned the lesson never sell a tool as you get nothing for them and as soon as you sell one you need it. This is a bearing packer and does a great job. The bearings are the ones from the trailer (seals said dexter on them, bearings are from china). http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4893.jpg This is a photo of the bearing in the packer, I am using red grease, brand can be seen in the previous photo. Note that it came out right away (leading edge white, indicating very little of the grease that was used to pack the bearings a CW) http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4894.jpg http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4895.jpg Now these bearings are PACKED with grease, excess can be wiped away. http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4896.jpg So.... now back together we go.... a little grease on the spindle. http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4897.jpg Seal seated correctly. http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4898.jpg Correct preload on the bearings and spindle nut retainer in place. To get the correct preload tighten the spindle nut while turning the drum. when the spindle nut meets resistance, stops turning with a small amount of effort (a light touch is needed), back the nut off one flat (just far enough that you can get the cotter pin through one of the openings in the castle nut retainer. If you do not under stand this get help. http://www.irv2.com/attachments/photopost/data/1515/DSC_4900.jpg
GlennLever 09/20/14 07:49am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Outrageous Pricing

You all are scaring me! :E I hope they can install tires and repack bearings! I just ordered 4 GY 614's and made an appointment for install and wheel bearing re-pack. Now...I shopped all over for the tires and CW had the best price $304 plus I got a $25 rebate per tire making them $279 each. The re-pack quote was $229 for our double axle Alpenlite as opposed to the $269 from the local guy. Average price from other tire sources was in the $370 range plus shipping. Here in the north corner of WA state, local dealers are most often higher priced than CW for service and many supplies. I would pay a little extra to support the local shops but not a few hundred more! Amazon is often less expensive than either when purchasing equipment/supplies etc. I did get the same ADCO cover that CW sells for $368 for $330 free shipping. Saved me $30 plus a trip south! My experience with CW is like everywhere else...shop around to see where the best deal is. PS My appointment was scheduled a month out so they must be very busy! We have not had good luck at the CW's service in Fife or Burlington, WA. The service done in Burlington CW was so bad it all had to be redone in the Mesa, AZ CW at the direction of Marcus Lemonis, CEO Camping World. Had it not been for Marcus Lemonis's intervention we probably would have had to pay over $2500 to get the work that Burlington, WA didn't do properly corrected at the Mesa, AZ CW. This all started out as out of warranty work that was to be paid for by the RV manufacturer. First they were required to do an inspection and report their findings. The Manufacturer approved the repairs which CW Burlington told us would be completed by 5:00PM. We came back at 5:00PM and they hadn't even started doing the work. Had to make a 4 hour round trip a week later to pick up the unit and later found out that hadn't done the repairs they were authorized to do. The repairs that had been authorized in Burlington, WA CW had to be done properly in Mesa, AZ. Don't know what would have happened without getting Marcus Lemonis involved. Marcus came through but it sure has left a bad taste in our mouth for the Burlington, WA CW. Before they even started to do the inspection that the manufacturer had authorized, they immediately started trying to add on other work that supposedly was needed. It was all phony.
MrVan 09/04/14 01:14pm Camping World Service and Installation
RE: Outrageous Pricing

You all are scaring me! :E I hope they can install tires and repack bearings! I just ordered 4 GY 614's and made an appointment for install and wheel bearing re-pack. Now...I shopped all over for the tires and CW had the best price $304 plus I got a $25 rebate per tire making them $279 each. The re-pack quote was $229 for our double axle Alpenlite as opposed to the $269 from the local guy. Average price from other tire sources was in the $370 range plus shipping. Here in the north corner of WA state, local dealers are most often higher priced than CW for service and many supplies. I would pay a little extra to support the local shops but not a few hundred more! Amazon is often less expensive than either when purchasing equipment/supplies etc. I did get the same ADCO cover that CW sells for $368 for $330 free shipping. Saved me $30 plus a trip south! My experience with CW is like everywhere else...shop around to see where the best deal is. PS My appointment was scheduled a month out so they must be very busy!
SH 09/02/14 07:04pm Camping World Service and Installation
RE: How much do you pay for the following work

Around here in central AZ, I was quoted $129 to $150 an axle for a re-pack, new seals and brake inspection/adjustment. I found a shop that charged me $29/wheel for the re-pack/re-seal and brake adjustment and an additional $18/wheel for all-new bearings. $100 per axle =with= new bearings and seals. Sure stops better, without grabbing, too. Add $75 to $100 for a mobile service to show up, plus hourly. Lyle
laknox 08/25/14 01:28pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Question about Eazy lube axles

Here is a pic of the spindle of an E-Z lube axle and you can see the zerk fitting on the end of the spindle where you pump in the grease. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreaseoriginal_zpsf30322c8.jpg width=600 Below is a picture of the hole where the grease comes out. The grease goes into the zerk thru the center of the axle and exits that hole. It is located just inside of the grease seal that rides up on that flat portrion in the picture and the grease inters the area between the larger diameter of the inside bearing and the grease seal. This is why one has to be EXTREMELY CAREFUL and follow carefully the directions such as rotating as you pump (which takes two people since one needs to be rotating the wheel while the other pumps the grease SLOWLY) and ONLY USING a hand pump grease gun since a powered one can force the grease into that small area too fast and blow past the grease seal. This significant downside is still there even with hand pumping if the conditions are just right. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreasehole1_zps89b35ea4.jpg width=600 Here is another picture of that exit point with some grease coming out of the hole in the axle. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreasehole2_zps2f2652c3.jpg width=600 Now to the meat of the main issues with these E-Z lube axles. To analyze this at my first bearing service after I carefully cleaned all the bearings I pump grease into the zerk to just where it starts to come out of that hole. I then installed a completely dry bearing and the old grease seal into the hub and mounted the hub to the axle. To properly document a snapshot I then did TWO FULL STROKE pump on a standard hand grease gun w/o rotating the hub since I wanted to get a feeling for how much grease actually got to the bearing. This was because there had been multiple posts like yours where individuals were giving their axles one to like five pumps of grease and thinking they had actually done anything. I was appalled at the result. Below in just how much grease you get in that area with those two full pumps I described above. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Twopumpgrease_zps59a5876e.jpg width=600 As they say a picture is worth a thousand words.:p Now here are the real issues and why these E-Z lube axles are a great idea, with poor execution and dismal effectiveness. To even have a hope of being effective the entire void between the two bearing inside the hub cavity has to be 100% packed with grease w/o voids or air pockets. The only way I can even think to accomplish this is to some how install the hub with the inner bearing and grease seal installed leaving the outside bearing out and then somehow stuff grease into that cavity ensuring you don't have any voids or air pockets. This is critical since the how concept of these axles is to pump grease into that zerk with it coming out at that inner cavity and forcing enough grease out thru the hub and thru the outer bearing so you replace a large amount of grease in each bearing. No body says how much grease you should see come out from zerk end of the axle thru the outer bearing. Also, there is absolutely no way to tell for sure if the grease pumped in or expelled has been evenly distributed around each bearing. This requires IMO a whole lot of HOPE and some serious PRAYING. I will readily admit I didn't document as well as I could exactly how much grease one wastes in filling that hub void around the axle between the two bearings and on some more noodling my first SWAG of close to two tubes for 4 wheels once everything is said and done is I think closer to being right that my second SWAG of 1/3 tube per wheel or 1 and 1/3 tubes for 4 wheels. There is a lot of space around that axle between the bearings that must be 100% filled with grease and in any event ALL THAT GREASE in there is WASTED since that is not used with a normal hand pack bearing service. I won't even get into how you initially fill up the cavity initially w/o leaving air pockets or voids and am still wanting to see how someone SLOWLY PUMPS in grease while SIMULATANOUSLY ROTATING the wheel so you evenly distribute the grease around the bearing and don't accidently try and force a lot of grease at a concentrated spot with the least point of resistance probably being that immediate grease seal since what you are doing is forcing the grease against that seal and HOPING is pushes grease the entire length of the hub and out the outer bearing area. SORRY anyone logically looking at what is required and what is to be accomplished that wouldn't have nightmares is IMO just not RIGHT INSIDE as the ole car commercial said. My bottom line recommendation is to ignore the EZ Lube capability and just do a regular normal disassembly, inspect and hand pack. Larry
LarryJM 08/22/14 12:13pm Travel Trailers
RE: Another tire question, do you rotate them?

When I re-pack the wheel bearings annually, the tires come off to do this so I rotate them. Can't hurt and only takes a minute to roll the tires to the other side before putting them on.
Neal47 08/15/14 07:10pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: F350 SRW weight limitations

I have a 3700 lb. camper when fully loaded and of that weight only 200 lbs. is carried by the front suspension, wheels, and tires. The diesel engine is carried by the front suspension, wheels, and tires, and adds no load at all to the rear axle and its wheel bearings and tires. Focus on the rear of the truck. Tires are available for the stock rims with a load capacity of 3750 per tire or a total load capacity of 7500 lbs at the rear axle less the 3200 lb. weight of the truck which leaves a payload capacity of 4300 lbs. for the truck. That is the payload that the rear can handle with an adequate set of leaf springs. GM has rear axles on its heavy duty trucks rated at 6000, 6500, 6700, 9300 lbs. and the difference is the leaf pack that is put on the truck at the factory. My 2500 SRW has a 6700 GAWR rating and standard 3500 SRW trucks have a rating of 6500 lbs., and DRW a rating of 9300 lbs. - and with GM diesel pickups the same axles, wheel bearings, and rear differential is used on all of them. If the camper weight causes the truck to sag in the rear (with the new tires) then add SuperSprings. You can add one or two springs per side to provide a load capacity of 4,000 lbs. or 5,000 lbs. which is more than enough for most campers and gear. Important to realize that the payload rating is calculated at the factory and based on the weakest link when the truck is assembled and shipped out. Otherwise identical trucks with different wheels or leaf packs can have vastly different payload ratings applied at the factory. Modifications are done all the time which increase the payload rating as with adding Supersprings, new tires, airbags, and the like or to decrease the safe payload by lifting or lowering the truck or putting on flash rims and low profile tires.
wintersun 08/06/14 06:19pm Truck Campers
RE: Felt so bad for older couple traveling today

Nothing wrong with a TT. Just remember to pack your wheel bearings regularly.
mockturtle 07/16/14 01:21pm General RVing Issues
RE: Payload vs CWR

The stock truck has a factory calculated maximum payload figure that is based on the leaf packs and wheels provided on the truck when it leaves the factory. The Duramax 2500HD SRW, 3500HD SRW, and 3500HD DRW, all have the same axle and wheel bearings which are rated by AAM at 10,900 lbs. but the factory rear axle loads are rated at 6000-6700 for the 2500HD, at 6500 for the 3500HD and 9300 for the 3500HD DRW trucks. The difference is in the extra leaf pack on the 3500HD and the two extra wheels with the DRW version. No factory stock pickup is ready to drive down the highway with a heavy camper in the bed. Everyone upgrades the suspension and mods include adding Supersprings or air bags or stableloads or heavy duty shocks or anti-sway bars or all of these items. With SRW it is common to upgrade the factory tires to get more load capacity. In addition you will need to add tie-downs, possibly a special superhitch for towing, wiring for the camper that includes an isolator and fuse. Many also rig a backup camera for the camper. Don't expect a car salesman to be able to order a truck that is truly camper ready as they do not exist. The camper dealers know campers and can do some of the wiring and maybe install the tie-downs but that is about it. If you want a turnkey RV vehicle get a motorhome. Then all you need to do is put gas in the tank and start driving. Good idea to do more research so as to avoid costly mistakes like adding airbags for use with a camper. Also don't blindly accept the sticker weight on a camper. It is likely to be 300-400 lbs. lower than the actual dry weight of the camper. Take a look at the tires on the truck. My GM Duramax came with tires rated at 3195 lbs. and that meant a maximum camper weight of 3200 lbs. fully loaded. I quickly sold the tires that came with the truck and bought ones rated for 3750 lbs. to gain 1100 lbs. of load capacity. You do need to be a smart buyer and take the time to do the research. Don't expect to have everything done for you as this does not work with truck campers or truck camper camping.
wintersun 07/05/14 12:42am Truck Campers
RE: Greasing Trailer Wheels

The cavity does NOT have to be full to get grease to transfer to the outer wheel bearing, the internal shape of the hub allows grease to travel. I am afraid that is a misleading statement. On both the Dexter EZ-Lube as well as the similar AL-Ko Ultra Lube hubs, the grease must enter through the grease fitting, and pass through a hole drilled down the center of the axle to the area between the inboard seal and the inboard bearing. From there it is forced outward through the inboard bearing into the space between the inboard and outboard bearings. Once that space is filled up, the grease continues to be forced outward into and through the outboard being and escapes out through the space around the outside of the outboard bearing. The first time the grease fitting is used after hand packing and installing the bearings, enough grease must be pumped in to completely fill that space before any grease will be forced into the outboard bearing. The first grease forced in will be the "dirty" grease that has just been forced out of the inboard bearing, so that is why it is important to pump until you see "fresh" grease. Depending on how big the axle is, this can take most of a big cartridge of grease per each hub. Once the space is initially full, much less is required .... If your goal is to force grease with the gun to the outer bearing then yes that might be true, but the design of the hub WILL sling grease from the inner to the outer without the cavity being full. I just had mine apart tues and wed this week, my cavities where NOT full and grease was definitely moving around from the grease rifle to the outer bearing. This is all based on the design of the hub between the bearings. As the grease gets warm it moves the excess grease towards the outer bearing. At any rate, everything should be taken apart, inspected, hand packed, and installed with new seals every 10,000 miles or couple of three years regardless of how much you pump in between inspections. Absoloutly, the old grease isn't removed with just pumping new grease in. Wheel bearings on vehicles where never able to be greased like this, they just took standard maintenance. The design of the hub was also different, it didn't have the machined taper. "Slinging grease" from the inner thru the outer bearing... Now that's a new thought, (for me at least) had never heard that before... I find these wheel bearing threads fascinating reading..I've read about "churning", where the bearing is so full of grease that the rollers will slide instead of rolling in the race... if the center section of the hub is full of grease, it can't help transfer heat to the wheel and away from the bearings... etc. etc. Guess you pay your fifty cents and state your preference... hear's mine, tear apart, wash with lacqure thinner, hand pack with synthetic grease every two yrs... unless one wheel feels hotter at a reststop than the rest of them. Travel safe :)
Puddles 06/26/14 08:06pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Checking wheel bearings....

IMHO that was a huge waste of time and money. Just because the grease was dark means nothing. How did the bearings and races look? Also the bearings you removed may have been of a higher quality than the new ones. Great you did maintenance but the bearings usually don't need replacing. Just clean, repack with new seals and you are good to go! Bearings, races, seals, grease.... $125.00 IMHO, the bearings..... Almost nine years old and never touched just made more since to replace instead of re-pack. At the price I paid it was a no brainer. With me it's all about time and if the local shop would have been more reasonable I would have let them do it. Old bearings into the trash and new ones greased and in..... Spent more money to replace but definitely didn't waste any time. I think I spent maybe 5 minutes removing and replacing This was my first time messing with this and more than one shop, person and manufacture ( Alco ) recommend replacing due to my lack of past maintenance. Your money your time. Seals $20 still need to be replaced. Driving out races and replacing just as much time as cleaning the bearings probably more. Also if you are not skilled at race removal and reinstallation you may cause damage. A visual inspection is what you should always do. Just because there may have been a lack of maintenance means nothing. It's what they look like is what matters. Don't forget everyone in business needs to sell things. So to just throw away $100 IMHO is better spent on something else. That's just me! The above comments are more directed toward anyone thinking of checking out their bearings. I think I had 5 minutes tied up in the race removal and install, another couple minutes greasing the rear bearing and putting it back in with the seal. Next year this time I will inspect and repack when needed. I'm not an expert on telling the difference between a good and bad bearing...... Most of them looked good, just like the new ones but one looked like it could have been bad?? $25.00 a wheel to replace everything with the same bearing that came out made the most since to me and yes my money and very little time once I got past the first wheel. It seemed to take more time to jack it up take the wheel off and back on. $100.00 well spent.... I find it interesting it only took you 5 minutes to R&R the races and two minutes to grease the rear bearing install it with the seal. I think you should go into business, those are some very fast times especially for someone that does not know if a bearing/race are still usable. ;) I don't think the inspection of the bearings had any impact on how long it took me to change everything out. I think your more bent on the fact that I just removed the old and chucked it and used all new. Yes, my first time messing with this and right or wrong Alco said better off replacing since they had never been looked at. It was $100 bucks, no big deal and yes with the right tools the races come out very quickly and same going back in. Bearing packer saves some time also over hand packing. Maybe you just need to upgrade your toolbox. If your in doubt and have the money just replace.....
abc40kids 06/16/14 05:50am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Checking wheel bearings....

IMHO that was a huge waste of time and money. Just because the grease was dark means nothing. How did the bearings and races look? Also the bearings you removed may have been of a higher quality than the new ones. Great you did maintenance but the bearings usually don't need replacing. Just clean, repack with new seals and you are good to go! Bearings, races, seals, grease.... $125.00 IMHO, the bearings..... Almost nine years old and never touched just made more since to replace instead of re-pack. At the price I paid it was a no brainer. With me it's all about time and if the local shop would have been more reasonable I would have let them do it. Old bearings into the trash and new ones greased and in..... Spent more money to replace but definitely didn't waste any time. I think I spent maybe 5 minutes removing and replacing This was my first time messing with this and more than one shop, person and manufacture ( Alco ) recommend replacing due to my lack of past maintenance. Your money your time. Seals $20 still need to be replaced. Driving out races and replacing just as much time as cleaning the bearings probably more. Also if you are not skilled at race removal and reinstallation you may cause damage. A visual inspection is what you should always do. Just because there may have been a lack of maintenance means nothing. It's what they look like is what matters. Don't forget everyone in business needs to sell things. So to just throw away $100 IMHO is better spent on something else. That's just me! The above comments are more directed toward anyone thinking of checking out their bearings. I think I had 5 minutes tied up in the race removal and install, another couple minutes greasing the rear bearing and putting it back in with the seal. Next year this time I will inspect and repack when needed. I'm not an expert on telling the difference between a good and bad bearing...... Most of them looked good, just like the new ones but one looked like it could have been bad?? $25.00 a wheel to replace everything with the same bearing that came out made the most since to me and yes my money and very little time once I got past the first wheel. It seemed to take more time to jack it up take the wheel off and back on. $100.00 well spent.... I find it interesting it only took you 5 minutes to R&R the races and two minutes to grease the rear bearing install it with the seal. I think you should go into business, those are some very fast times especially for someone that does not know if a bearing/race are still usable. ;)
Cummins12V98 06/15/14 10:29am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Going on first long trip

Check your wheel bearings, brakes, tires for age cracking and pressure. Don't over pack with clothes and other stuff there are a lot of Walmart's along the way and CG's have laundry mats.
Gjac 06/14/14 07:05am Beginning RVing
RE: Checking wheel bearings....

IMHO that was a huge waste of time and money. Just because the grease was dark means nothing. How did the bearings and races look? Also the bearings you removed may have been of a higher quality than the new ones. Great you did maintenance but the bearings usually don't need replacing. Just clean, repack with new seals and you are good to go! Bearings, races, seals, grease.... $125.00 IMHO, the bearings..... Almost nine years old and never touched just made more since to replace instead of re-pack. At the price I paid it was a no brainer. With me it's all about time and if the local shop would have been more reasonable I would have let them do it. Old bearings into the trash and new ones greased and in..... Spent more money to replace but definitely didn't waste any time. I think I spent maybe 5 minutes removing and replacing This was my first time messing with this and more than one shop, person and manufacture ( Alco ) recommend replacing due to my lack of past maintenance. Your money your time. Seals $20 still need to be replaced. Driving out races and replacing just as much time as cleaning the bearings probably more. Also if you are not skilled at race removal and reinstallation you may cause damage. A visual inspection is what you should always do. Just because there may have been a lack of maintenance means nothing. It's what they look like is what matters. Don't forget everyone in business needs to sell things. So to just throw away $100 IMHO is better spent on something else. That's just me! The above comments are more directed toward anyone thinking of checking out their bearings. I think I had 5 minutes tied up in the race removal and install, another couple minutes greasing the rear bearing and putting it back in with the seal. Next year this time I will inspect and repack when needed. I'm not an expert on telling the difference between a good and bad bearing...... Most of them looked good, just like the new ones but one looked like it could have been bad?? $25.00 a wheel to replace everything with the same bearing that came out made the most since to me and yes my money and very little time once I got past the first wheel. It seemed to take more time to jack it up take the wheel off and back on. $100.00 well spent....
abc40kids 06/13/14 09:17pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: E-Z Lube Axles

You have to fill up the space, ONE TIME, not every time. I would guess most cases of blown seals are from powered grease guns. Not all. Most. Either that or someone didn't slowly rotate the wheel while slowly pumping grease into the zerk fitting. There is a lot of pressure coming out of those guns, even if they are hand pumped. If properly done, they work fine. If someone wants to hand pack there own bearings, great, because then you know that they were done right. At many shops, the folks who pack the bearings are usually the least experienced. I remove my hubs and check everything every few years. I do so to check the brakes just as much as I'm checking the bearings.
69 Avion 06/09/14 05:16pm General RVing Issues
RE: E-Z Lube Axles

Yes, do tell. Inquiring minds want to know. It's called hopeful wishing ... there is no way E-Z lube axles will save you money when it takes close to 2 to 2.5 large tubes of grease to do 4 wheels properly and then more when adding grease and then loosing all that when you have to do the normal tear down and inspect every couple of years anyway. LarryJust curious, I give my E-Z lube axles four shots with my grease gun (same as the ball joints on my truck). How does that add up to 2.5 tubes of grease for four wheels? All you need to do is replace the grease in the bearing with new grease. Nothing else but the bearings needs new grease. With your four shots of grease you are basically doing SQUAT to effectively use the E-Z lube function on your axle. Unfortunately you like a lot of others in this thread that say they like the E-Z lube capability apparantly don't understand exactly what they are, how they work and what is involved in using that capability effectively. I did the research and documented my findings with pictures and I guess I need to restate my findings here in the hopes that some folks with reason will see what I'm trying to convey and point out concerning these overly praised type axles. Here is a pic of the spindle of an E-Z lube axle and you can see the zerk fitting on the end of the spindle where you pump in the grease. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreaseoriginal_zpsf30322c8.jpg width=600 Below is a picture of the hole where the grease comes out. The grease goes into the zerk thru the center of the axle and exits that hole. It is located just inside of the grease seal that rides up on that flat portrion in the picture and the grease inters the area between the larger diameter of the inside bearing and the grease seal. This is why one has to be EXTREMELY CAREFUL and follow carefully the directions such as rotating as you pump (which takes two people since one needs to be rotating the wheel while the other pumps the grease SLOWLY) and ONLY USING a hand pump grease gun since a powered one can force the grease into that small area too fast and blow past the grease seal. This significant downside is still there even with hand pumping if the conditions are just right. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreasehole1_zps89b35ea4.jpg width=600 Here is another picture of that exit point with some grease coming out of the hole in the axle. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreasehole2_zps2f2652c3.jpg width=600 Now to the meat of the main issues with these E-Z lube axles. To analyze this at my first bearing service after I carefully cleaned all the bearings I pump grease into the zerk to just where it starts to come out of that hole. I then installed a completely dry bearing and the old grease seal into the hub and mounted the hub to the axle. To properly document a snapshot I then did TWO FULL STROKE pump on a standard hand grease gun w/o rotating the hub since I wanted to get a feeling for how much grease actually got to the bearing. This was because there had been multiple posts like yours where individuals were giving their axles one to like five pumps of grease and thinking they had actually done anything. I was appalled at the result. Below in just how much grease you get in that area with those two full pumps I described above. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Twopumpgrease_zps59a5876e.jpg width=600 As they say a picture is worth a thousand words.:p Now here are the real issues and why these E-Z lube axles are a great idea, with poor execution and dismal effectiveness. To even have a hope of being effective the entire void between the two bearing inside the hub cavity has to be 100% packed with grease w/o voids or air pockets. The only way I can even think to accomplish this is to some how install the hub with the inner bearing and grease seal installed leaving the outside bearing out and then somehow stuff grease into that cavity ensuring you don't have any voids or air pockets. This is critical since the how concept of these axles is to pump grease into that zerk with it coming out at that inner cavity and forcing enough grease out thru the hub and thru the outer bearing so you replace a large amount of grease in each bearing. No body says how much grease you should see come out from zerk end of the axle thru the outer bearing. Also, there is absolutely no way to tell for sure if the grease pumped in or expelled has been evenly distributed around each bearing. This requires IMO a whole lot of HOPE and some serious PRAYING. I will readily admit I didn't document as well as I could exactly how much grease one wastes in filling that hub void around the axle between the two bearings and on some more noodling my first SWAG of close to two tubes for 4 wheels once everything is said and done is I think closer to being right that my second SWAG of 1/3 tube per wheel or 1 and 1/3 tubes for 4 wheels. There is a lot of space around that axle between the bearings that must be 100% filled with grease and in any event ALL THAT GREASE in there is WASTED since that is not used with a normal hand pack bearing service. I won't even get into how you initially fill up the cavity initially w/o leaving air pockets or voids and am still wanting to see how someone SLOWLY PUMPS in grease while SIMULATANOUSLY ROTATING the wheel so you evenly distribute the grease around the bearing and don't accidently try and force a lot of grease at a concentrated spot with the least point of resistance probably being that immediate grease seal since what you are doing is forcing the grease against that seal and HOPING is pushes grease the entire length of the hub and out the outer bearing area. SORRY anyone logically looking at what is required and what is to be accomplished that wouldn't have nightmares is IMO just not RIGHT INSIDE as the ole car commercial said. As I've already said I think I have done the leg work and documented things to again say HOGWASH to those that I can only conclude either aren't maintaining these axles effectively, are simply wasting their time and effort with these 4 or 5 pumps of the grease gun and calling things good, or simply again are employing WISHFUL THINKING and believing that these E-Z lube axles are really worth extraordinary effort and time to maintain them properly and if you're not doing it properly you are WASTING YOUR TIME AND $$$ in grease. So all those wanting to blindly jump on that LOVE THE E-Z LUBE BAND WAGON go right ahead, but that's one band wagon I sure do not want to be riding on when it tips over or breaks down. I especially get a kick out of those that like to nitpick details such as the significance of between like 1 and 1/3 tube of grease and even double that since it's ALL WASTED to start with and good tubes of grease are not free the last time I looked. Carry on, I'm bascially thru with what I wanted to say and try and convey in the hopes of enlightening those that are willing to admit they might be able to learn something from those of us that have done basically the "heavy lifting" so to speak.;) Larry
LarryJM 06/06/14 01:03pm General RVing Issues
RE: E-Z Lube Axles

I love my EZ-lube axels ! Who ever says it does not save time and money has evidently never used them. I am on my second trailer with them, and grease them once a year. Saving time: I just jack each wheel and then squirt the grease in until the old stuff comes out. Saving money: one tube of grease will do more than four wheels: All I can say is HOGWASH I have used them and have even done a fairly good analysis and documentation of exactly what is involved ... something I doubt you have done. Just do a search on "E-Z Lube" and my username in posts over 12mo old to see my detailed posts and how these E-Z Lube hubs work and what is involved in using them properly. Unfortunately all the detailed pics I took aren't there since they were hosted on Webshots before that system was abandoned and I haven't seen a need to redo them in photobucket. I just peaked at my prior posts on this and I guess one clarification is that back in 2010 or so when I did my analysis I came up with about 1/3 of a tube per hub so it will take upwards of 2 tubes so I embellished the amount somewhat in my last post. I'm not one to adhere to the once a year inspection, but more along the line of around 3 to 4 years and a good hand pack of the bearings with a good quality Moly fortified grease doesn't require any additions like using the E-Z Lube option so THERE IS NO TIME SAVINGS and because of all the additional needed grease to fill the hub cavity is simply wasted grease AND WASTED MONEY .... Thus I content the FACT IS THERE IS NO TIME OR $$$$ SAVINGS in using the E-Z Lube option on our trailers ... end of story:p When and if I ever have a bearing failure, I'll come back and tell you, but the first trailer was five years old when I traded it, and this one is now six years old FWIW I owned my last trailer from 1982 to 2007 and now this one from 2007 and in those 32 years have done all my wheel bearing maintenance and have also never had a bearing failure. Jack L All I can say is I am glad you corrected yourself on the quantity of grease that you conveniently told wrong. and I'll gladly stick to my much easier and quicker method. Do you use that "hog wash" to clean your bearings too ! Cheers, Jack L
NanciL 06/06/14 06:50am General RVing Issues
RE: E-Z Lube Axles

I love my EZ-lube axels ! Who ever says it does not save time and money has evidently never used them. I am on my second trailer with them, and grease them once a year. Saving time: I just jack each wheel and then squirt the grease in until the old stuff comes out. Saving money: one tube of grease will do more than four wheels: All I can say is HOGWASH I have used them and have even done a fairly good analysis and documentation of exactly what is involved ... something I doubt you have done. Just do a search on "E-Z Lube" and my username in posts over 12mo old to see my detailed posts and how these E-Z Lube hubs work and what is involved in using them properly. Unfortunately all the detailed pics I took aren't there since they were hosted on Webshots before that system was abandoned and I haven't seen a need to redo them in photobucket. I just peaked at my prior posts on this and I guess one clarification is that back in 2010 or so when I did my analysis I came up with about 1/3 of a tube per hub so it will take upwards of 2 tubes so I embellished the amount somewhat in my last post. I'm not one to adhere to the once a year inspection, but more along the line of around 3 to 4 years and a good hand pack of the bearings with a good quality Moly fortified grease doesn't require any additions like using the E-Z Lube option so THERE IS NO TIME SAVINGS and because of all the additional needed grease to fill the hub cavity is simply wasted grease AND WASTED MONEY .... Thus I content the FACT IS THERE IS NO TIME OR $$$$ SAVINGS in using the E-Z Lube option on our trailers ... end of story:p When and if I ever have a bearing failure, I'll come back and tell you, but the first trailer was five years old when I traded it, and this one is now six years old FWIW I owned my last trailer from 1982 to 2007 and now this one from 2007 and in those 32 years have done all my wheel bearing maintenance and have also never had a bearing failure. Jack L
LarryJM 06/06/14 05:39am General RVing Issues
Service in Nashville

Hi, I am currently full-timing and will be in Nashville in a couple of weeks' time. I'd like to get some service work done on my Fleetwood Flair (Chevy P32 chassis, 7.4 liter) - tire rotations, front brakes, re-pack wheel bearings, differential oil, engine oil and so-on. Anyone recommend a good RV service shop in Nashville? All the service work is on the Chevy base vehicle. Thanks
Hymerman 05/17/14 11:20pm Tech Issues
RE: wheel bearings

I have to agree with whoever it is on here who keeps saying "Do you pack your tow vehicle bearings that often"? He makes a good point because who bothers to pull their rotors and repack every year and they run much hotter than any trailer wheel I have ever shot my temp gun at or put my hand on. Not knowing what the previous owner did or how they were packed at the factory I do them so I know everything is good. I would pull the wheels on a new rig and check the amount of grease because I have seen new wheel bearings in various types of equipment with a bare minimum of grease. Either someone told them to cut costs or however or whoever was packing the bearings with no grease in the center cavity. They appeared to be properly pushing the grease into the bearing cone but there was nothing on the center of the spindle or cavity area. It appeared that they were using a bearing packer but not doing any more than that. I contacted a bearing supplier many years ago when seeing this and they said the cavity should be 80% full. You dont have many miles but you do have years. I have seen wheel bearings start to rust or corrode in the spot that they have been sitting. When you check the bearings wash them out good and use a flashlight and magnifying glass if needed to look beyond the rollers and inspect the inner race area just as you would look at the cup. Roll the rollers and cage so that you can see the entire surface. Roll each roller to look at all of it. Like they say, the chain is only as strong as the weakest link.
rjxj 05/15/14 08:26pm Travel Trailers
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