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 > Your search for 'pack bearings wheel' found 62 matches.

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RE: Wheel Bearing Question

I'll pass along some of what I found out from Dexter. A good company I might add, where the customer is still part of their business. In talking with their tech service I asked the question on why put the EZ lube feature on a TT or a 5er? The answer I got was interesting. They know one of the leading causes of axle death is lack of lube of the bearings. They went on that the average person never even looks at the running gear, less grease them on any type of frequency. By bringing the EZ lube into trailers other then the boats they were made for, gave the axle a better chance the owner may actually give the bearing some lube giving it a chance to survive. A point I never considered that the issue was this bad. So there is part of the reason EZ lube shows up on TT's. Now what do I do? I do all my own service. Including installing and aligning my new axles to meet and be well inside dexters spec here in my own yard. Proper axle alignment on a TT is a whole other topic. I use quality name brand grease and I hand pack so "I" know what I have. Even though I bought my new axle tubes with the Ultra lube (alko's version of EZ lube) prep but I do not use it. I have it in case on a very long trip out west 5,000 miles from home I need to add grease from bad dusty conditions etc. I have yet to use it. Since I have done the re-pack I have no issues going beyond a year. Even 3 years but that would be it. Don't trust the brake any more then that. The grease from my hand pack still has good grease on both sides of the bearing after 3 years. It's not hard, it is quality grease. BUT, I know what I have. There are no short cuts taken and I use quality double lip seals when ever the wheel comes off. If I had to hire this out, I would not trust it like this. And yes, I too bring parts and grease in the camper to do an axle job on the side of the road. Hope I never need to use it. I upgraded to self adjusting brakes when I put the new axles in. So they are always up in adjustment. Between the self adjusters and the #10 gage star pattern wiring upgrade right to each wheel, I have as good as I feel I can get on a brake drum setup. Observation is key. When on long trip, every time the truck stops for gas, the camper gets a walk around. Hubs felt for temp, look for wicking grease, look at the tires, look at the hitch. Amazing what you can find just looking. Stuff happens. But doing the simple looking can go a long way to catching issue before big problem come. The once a year recommendation from the manufactures, they have to give something that is reasonable and fits what the open public can handle. Remember one of the causes of axle death? lack of lube. Not that it fly's out, that it doesn't get done. If a manufacture was to give 3 years, they may never get grease... I will say a brand new axle wants and needs a look and repack no more than the 1st year. No way would I trust the modern day axle lube job from the factory. All 6 of the trailers I bought, cargo and TT all had bare minimum grease in the bearings. When I bought the 6 x 12 cargo trailer, the dealer even said, don't go too long on your 1st greasing. I was shocked it was so light. Then I got use to it not coming when new. Axle greasing is an individual thing. Do what you feel is right for you and you can trust. PS. This is the wheel off my camper I bought used, hand packed bearings. I bought this camper from a state that does annual required inspections. Odds are high when they pull the wheel for brake inspection, pull it look and put in back on. No new seal. Well that nicked the seal and you get this. Again I trust no ones work other then my own or someone I have taught or who taught me. http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b378/JBarca/T310SR%20Camper%20Upgrades/Axle%20Rebuild/9blownseal.jpg
JBarca 03/13/15 10:03pm Travel Trailers
RE: Single axle bearing repack

I do not even know what a bearing looks like, let alone adjust the breaks? I have the never adjust breaks on the axles, I suppose those are worthless too? Thanks for any info. Please don't take this as an insult or anything like that because it's not. Bearings and brakes are two of the most important things on your TT. If you don't know what a "bearing looks like" you have a lot of learning to do before you should mess around with them. Brakes are even more important!! I learned to pack bearings from my dad 45 years ago. I did several with him standing right there critiquing my work. I recall I did several things wrong on the first few. But with him correcting me I got through it and learned. Dozens and dozens of brake and bearing jobs latter done with no failures I would say I was taught pretty good. There is a reason we just can't go on YouTube and learn to fly an airplane! IMHO you should not go on YouTube and watch a bearing pack and then say, "I'm good to go now, lets get the jack............" Contrary to popular belief on here there is no reason to do bearing packs every year. I check mine about every 7 or 8 years and almost always I take a peek and do nothing because they are fine. If you do the same it only comes out to about $20 bucks a year for you to have someone do your bearings. I'm alright at math but there is a reason I hire an expert to do my taxes. See my point? Anyway, good luck with whatever you decide to do. :) To the OP: Sorry but I disagree with Mr. Peeps above. This is not rocket science. It is simple stuff and anyone can learn to do it. Even by watching You Tube. Don't be put off of learning to do this kind of work on your TT or MH. Not only does it save you a lot of money better for buying steaks and good wine, but it is also satisfying to do. There are also great drawings and instructions available on the Web for this. If you take your time, follow the instructions and double check your work everything will be fine. The secret is this: MOST of this stuff has been designed to be "idiot proof" in other words it will really only go together one way. I suggest a little moral support too a good friend or neighbor to stand by and hand you tools. NOT your wife! That would be a big mistake. Once you get the wheel off and the drum pulled you will be able to identify all the parts and see what they do. Take heart you can do it. And even if you get stuck somewhere along the line you can go to your local NAPA store or trailer/ RV place and talk to someone there and they can more than likely tell you what you've done wrong. Then after you are done give your TT a test run. Good luck.
4X4Dodger 03/11/15 07:31am Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearing Question

nobody ever thinks of repacking their cars wheel bearings every year. And it's wheels are subjected to the same if not tougher conditions than a trailers.I cannot find a single reason to do this yearly re pack. Bring a trailer bearing along to an auto parts store. Ask to see a wheel bearing for your truck. Now ask yourself "What could possibly go wrong" The issue is RE PACKING not bearing strength. Re packing is an issue of loss of grease or degradation of the grease or contamination. There are differences in bearings of course. But simply repacking will NOT make your bearing stronger. But essentially the two bearing types are the same. They see the same forces (in varying degrees) and types of wear. They are both lubricated either by grease or oil and they perform the same function. If you feel that the Quality of the bearings is bad then replace them. But the issue is the same, I dont believe there is a need to repack them every 12 months.
4X4Dodger 03/10/15 10:34am Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearing Question

nobody ever thinks of repacking their cars wheel bearings every year. And it's wheels are subjected to the same if not tougher conditions than a trailers.I cannot find a single reason to do this yearly re pack. Bring a trailer bearing along to an auto parts store. Ask to see a wheel bearing for your truck. Now ask yourself "What could possibly go wrong"
Lynnmor 03/09/15 08:16am Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearing Question

My take on this. Most cars do not require repacking bearings yearly, if ever. They do however use high quality bearings and often use synthetic grease. Yes there are different grades of bearings. I replaced the Chinese originals in our Dexter with SKF and properly packed them with Amsoil synthetic. Over packing can lead to over heating (the BIG fault of EZ lube). I will adjust brakes and check hub temps and I carry the old bearings and a set of seals properly packed as back up. I think the redo yearly is a CYA. I agree. This idea has always bugged me. nobody ever thinks of repacking their cars wheel bearings every year. And it's wheels are subjected to the same if not tougher conditions than a trailers. I have put more than 100,000 miles on most sets of car bearings with no problems. I think the Yearly re pack for trailers is a holdover/carryover from boat trailers where the wheels get submerged in water salt or fresh on a regular basis. I cannot find a single reason to do this yearly re pack. I do regularly inspect for evidence of a leak of grease or if the wheel is running hot. This is the trailer equivalent of the 3000 mile oil change. We have just accepted it as gospel without any real scrutiny of the facts. The real benefit goes to the people who sell all the grease and bearings and do the shop work. A set of good bearings and good seals should last a very long time.
4X4Dodger 03/09/15 07:13am Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearing Question

Wheel Bearings are 1 year old. Discovered I have the Dexter axle EZ Lube system. So will I need to repack the bearings every year or is the EZ Lube system sufficient. Thanks in advance for the help... Just my opinion...I was looking at same set of questions when we bought our latest TT couple months ago. Here is what I ended up doing after reading all the horror stories. Totally replacing all bearings and cups every year would be the best way but not very practicable and crazy IMO. I jacked up trailer... remove dust cap... remove cotter pin...pulled hub and gave good inspection...everything looked OK...squirted grease in at same time rotating wheel until I saw my new grease that was different color (not grease type, just color) and when I saw grease move. I called it good. Lots of youtube vids on the subject. When hub was off got the numbers off from the bearing and picked up spare set of bearings and new dust cover for one wheel. Have owners manual printed out and filed with other manuals for TT. WHY... because even though I know I have grease in the bearings of every hub, I don't know if any galling or abnormal wear has taken place. But now I can replace a bearing or cup on road if need be. So lots of choices and opinions of what to do. Not saying my way is the best just what I do. And very strongly recommend carrying new grease of your choice in its un-opened sealed container and then put that inside a plastic bag. I already bring along disposable gloves and paper towels. I used to buy a fancy high temp grease, good up to 1200 degrees or some high temp. But was something like $17.00 a tube. Then it dawned on me. If my bearings are running that hot I've got a problem no matter what type of grease I use. Called manufacture and found out what they used for grease and found Walmart has the same spec's and compatible but different color and is available nation wide in there stores. "Super-tech" is good up to 400 degrees or something like that. My bearings temps using a IR gun have not gone over 130. So I don't need expensive high temp grease for wheel bearings. And I run a small bead of cheap silicone around dust cover and have not hard any problems with any leaking. When I do an annual inspection and see grease on brake pads or small metal filings mixed in with grease then I'll do a complete hand re-pack of bearings, but not until then. OK your mileage will vary, but that's what I do.
path1 03/08/15 03:21pm Travel Trailers
RE: Single axle bearing repack

After all the years I spent in the automotive business I can say with confidence that the wheel bearing repack is a messy and unnecessary service. I am not saying that they do not need to be done but the frequency and way people have them done or do them is a waste of money. For a trailer carry a small infrared thermometer and shoot the hubs on occasion. You are looking for a drastic temp variation from one hub to the next. Remember to give them a few minutes after stopping to dump the brake heat. This little step will keep you from getting blindsided by a bearing failure. When it is time, I will not set a specific period, remove the hubs/drums from the axles. Wipe off the rollers with a paper towel and check them for discoloration. Next do the same with the races. If the bearings look good throw them in the trash. Wipe the excess grease out of the hub area, knock the races out, toss them and then clean the hub. Pack the new bearings, install the new races and reinstall hubs/drums. I will not get in to a discussion on the proper bearing packing or adjustment techniques. You will find that it is almost the same price to replace all the bearings as it is to purchase the necessary solvents and air dry cleaners to properly clean the old bearings. The other advantage to installing a new bearing is there is no possible chance of you missing the one roller that has flaked in one tiny spot. It is easy to miss an age caused imperfection in a used bearing. To those of you who travel a lot of miles each year I advise you to carry a set of packed bearings and if possible a hub/drum with bearings packed, installed and ready to go. It is almost as easy to replace a bad bearing/hub assembly as it is to change a flat tire. The other advantage is if you can not do this repair yourself you do not need to depend on the shop having the necessary parts in stock. It is also a proven fact that if you carry extra bearings or a hub assembly you will never need them. Randy
randallb 03/08/15 07:40am Travel Trailers
RE: Confused about bearings

There are lots of videos on places like youtube that will answer all your questions. Personally when I hand pack bearings I always smear a generous gob of grease on the race before I insert the bearing. I then using a greasy finger i smear the grease around then press the seal in. No one learns how to pack bearings any more with front wheel drive and sealed bearings. Been packing wheel bearings for about 50+ years.
rhagfo 03/01/15 08:53pm General RVing Issues
RE: Helpful Ideas for Alaskan Travels

I'd suggest making sure the wheel bearings for those going to Alaska...on your trailer, are packed with grease prior to the trip! Had an incident with mine a few years back..on a Friday night, and there where no parts available until the next week, so we where stranded at the repair shop for 5 days! So, when bearings go, you possibly might even have to change the whole axle (which I did have to) thus making getting parts even more difficult. So, pack them wheel bearings before any long trip, as often they might go on you in mountainous terrain with no cities around. Also, having an AA or AAA membership is a plus as well, which I had for the vehicle, but neglected at the time of registration to get it for any pull trailer behind....so I paid over $400.00 to have my trailer on a tow truck for just over 20 miles! Best of luck, and enjoy...as we'll be headed up that way in mid summer ourselves!
Powerstroke2000 02/20/15 04:40pm RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: How do I stay under RAWR in Dynamax REV 24RB?

The main reason I posted is because I searched the forums for info on cargo weight before buying because the manufacturers don't post that info because buyers wouldn't understand it. I would have understood front/rear dry weight and it would have saved me a $62000 mistake and potential lawsuit. I bought the REV to use as a van with a kitchen sink and bath. We all love it. It suits our needs better than anything else I looked at. If we camp it will be 2 and lightweight cargo except maybe a scooter on rear hitch which would make rear axle over weight. If we dry camp 40gal+40gal holding tanks 1/2 full adds 350 lb to rear axle. If we do a family outing to the beach 6 passengers and light beach gear overloads rear axle. I don't endorse overloading or anything. But there are varying degrees of offense here. Pack the family in for a short trip to the beach in Florida-probably at lower speeds-is a pretty benign trip for an RV. Make up your margins with lower speeds, attentive driving, and fastidious tire care. Be especially pro active in keeping the tires fresh..not let them get old and rotten. Be proactive about any scheduled maintenance of the rear wheel bearings (if any). Travel with as limited water aboard as possible. I'd think twice about scooter on rear hitch. I don't even do that with lots of extra capacity. Maybe best to pull the scooter on a small trailer. You do have some extra capacity there.
tpi 02/19/15 02:37pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Continuous failure of TT wheel bearings - I am so ashamed...

Not enough grease and adjusting nut too tight is the typical reasons as to why bearings overheat and fail. You may have one or both.. To "pack" the bearings correctly you MUST force as much grease INTO the race, this can be done by hands and fingers or a specially made for tool for the bearings.. If you are simply wiping some grease around the race and calling it done you are under greasing the bearing. You have to take a good glob of grease and force it between the bearings until it is coming out the sides of the bearing. Then another glob goes around the bearing and another glob on the inside of the hub.. To tighten the bearings correctly you will run the nut tight by hand, then while turning the drum tighten a little more until you feel some drag from the bearing. Then you LOOSEN the nut 1/4 turn. Then you tighten the nut slightly WHILE NOT TURNING THE DRUM. You now insert the cotter pin. IF PIN HOLE DOES NOT LINE UP WITH CASTLE OPENING YOU LOOSEN NUT JUST ENOUGH TO INSERT PIN! YOU DO NOT TIGHTEN THE NUT TO ALIGN THE PIN. The result will often be SOME slop or looseness in the bearing.. You do not "torque" the trailer axle nuts down, doing so will result bearing failure. Axle castle nuts do not have "fine" adjustments they are very coarse adjustments when compared to auto wheel bearing castle nuts.. You can read the instructions from Dexter.. HERE ^^^This^^^ I wondered also about his packing technique. Using only the zerk on the spindle to grease it up after installation is another sure fail. Tell us in detail how you are changing your bearings.
mosseater 02/12/15 06:04pm Tech Issues
RE: Continuous failure of TT wheel bearings - I am so ashamed...

Not enough grease and adjusting nut too tight is the typical reasons as to why bearings overheat and fail. You may have one or both.. To "pack" the bearings correctly you MUST force as much grease INTO the race, this can be done by hands and fingers or a specially made for tool for the bearings.. If you are simply wiping some grease around the race and calling it done you are under greasing the bearing. You have to take a good glob of grease and force it between the bearings until it is coming out the sides of the bearing. Then another glob goes around the bearing and another glob on the inside of the hub.. To tighten the bearings correctly you will run the nut tight by hand, then while turning the drum tighten a little more until you feel some drag from the bearing. Then you LOOSEN the nut 1/4 turn. Then you tighten the nut slightly WHILE NOT TURNING THE DRUM. You now insert the cotter pin. IF PIN HOLE DOES NOT LINE UP WITH CASTLE OPENING YOU LOOSEN NUT JUST ENOUGH TO INSERT PIN! YOU DO NOT TIGHTEN THE NUT TO ALIGN THE PIN. The result will often be SOME slop or looseness in the bearing.. You do not "torque" the trailer axle nuts down, doing so will result bearing failure. Axle castle nuts do not have "fine" adjustments they are very coarse adjustments when compared to auto wheel bearing castle nuts.. You can read the instructions from Dexter.. HERE
Gdetrailer 02/12/15 04:25pm Tech Issues
RE: Continuous failure of TT wheel bearings - I am so ashamed...

A couple of things to look at. First what is the weight of your trailer and what is the weight rating of the axles? A lot of axles have a tag on them with the rating. Second, what kind of lube are you using on the bearings? You should pack them with a good quality wheel bearing grease. Third, are you preloading the bearings correctly? If you over-tighten them or leave them too loose it can cause premature failure. If none of these are the problem, I would seriously look at replacing the axles with heavier duty ones. Are you replacing the bearing races when you replace the bearings? Are the seals damaged and allowing moisture to enter?
mabynack 02/12/15 01:56pm Tech Issues
RE: My relentless pursuit to cure trailer sway - the dancing TT

I could see the adjustable stinger being handy if you trade trucks often or tow the same TT with more than one truck. Once you dial in the height to a TV/TT combo there is no need for further adjustments. If you keep your vehicles a long time the adjustable part is not very useful IMO, and you're stuck with the extra weight as lantley points out. I do the same as Cobra, periodically remove the dust caps on the main bearings and look for water, dirt, etc. So far they are clean and dry so I have not seen the need to re-pack. They are essentially wheel bearings, except they don't see the high speeds and heat that wheel bearings do, so the there's no reason for the grease to break down unless it gets contaminated. Call Hensley and order the bronze bushing for the spring bars and get the emergency kit while you're on the phone with them. Be sure to give the spring bars at least 10 pumps each with the grease gun to make sure they are fully lubed. I killed 2 bushings before I figured out I wasn't greasing the bars enough. I posted this pic a while back but a search wouldn't bring up the thread. One of the jack tubes stripped its threads and wouldn't go up or down. I had a length of chain in the truck and made this field repair. Measured the tensioned length of the good jack tube and approximated how many links, then adjusted the good side to match the length of chain so they were both equal. Jacked the tongue waaay up to get the chain on. Best part was that it towed just like normal about 2 hrs home! http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y134/Burbman/EVO1087_zps6f9f5101_1.jpg width=640
BurbMan 01/28/15 09:36am Travel Trailers
RE: EZ Lube bearings

My current 5er uses oil bath wheel bearings (that's an entirely different subject), but my experience is that the EZ Lube bearing arrangement is fine for unbraked boat trailers where the intent is to flush water out of the bearing cavity and there are no brakes to contaminate, but where drum brakes are involved, I don't trust the EZ Lube approach - pull 'em and pack 'em. YMMV Rusty From what I was told the new MobileSuites do not come with oil bath bearings. They are greasable. So does that make them EZ lube? Mine will be on the MorRyde system with Kodiak Disk Brakes. Thanks
Cummins12V98 01/23/15 08:35am Fifth-Wheels
RE: EZ Lube bearings

My current 5er uses oil bath wheel bearings (that's an entirely different subject), but my experience is that the EZ Lube bearing arrangement is fine for unbraked boat trailers where the intent is to flush water out of the bearing cavity and there are no brakes to contaminate, but where drum brakes are involved, I don't trust the EZ Lube approach - pull 'em and pack 'em. YMMV Rusty
RustyJC 01/23/15 07:51am Fifth-Wheels
replacing electric brakes

I have a 5th wheel 12 years old and am planning to replace the brakes and pack the wheel bearings and replace the hub seals. It has 2 6,000# axles and hubs are 12" 6 hole. My questions are 1. without taking it apart would the brakes be 12" x 2"? 2. Is the original electric actuator ok to use? 3. Is it best to replace the brake shoes, springs etc, or purchase the brakes installed on the 5 hole backing plate? 4. Where can the parts be purchased? 5. Is packing the bearings with Super Tech grease the correct grease to use, and should the void in the hub be filled with grease? 6. Where can the correct grease seals be purchased? I used to pack my own automobile wheels and install the brakes. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
Casinojunkie 01/21/15 01:25pm Beginning RVing
RE: Is being a little over GVWR no worse than doing 60 in a 55?

Often times GVWR is limited to less than f+R awr due to brakes. We know the frame is designed for the full rating at each end, so there is something else limiting it. There are times where exceeding GVWR isn't a big deal, and other times where it is. It really just depends on what your using. Actually brakes on a vehicle ( our trucks or trailers) are determined by the axle rating; NHTSA says this about components of the GAWR: "Gross Axle Weight Rating is the rated load-carrying capacity of an individual axle and wheel assembly. (It represents the load that may be steadily sustained by the components in the system; i.e., tires, rims, hubs, bearing, axles, brakes, suspension, sub frame, etc. with the GAWR limited by the components with the lowest working rating". This is one big reason dot allows us to use the sum of the vehicles axle rating as the vehicles GVW (if required) and another reason GVWR doesn't determine how much load the truck can carry safely/legally. Many times its not the tires that is the weak link in any size truck. looking at tire/wheels/spring rate spec on Fords 150/250/350 trucks shows the wheels with the lowest rating on some trucks and others its the spring pack. Not so true on 3/4 and 1 ton pickups. The axle on my pickup is the same axle, and same brakes, as the one used on a DRW. The GAWR has a difference of 3150lbs, but only a GVWR difference of 2300lbs. Ford even discusses that brakes are sized to the GVWR in their towing brochure. "Towing vehicle’s braking system is rated for operation at GVWR"... which on any HD pickup is less than the sum of front and rear. On my TT the 5200lb axle has the same brakes as a 6K, 7K, and some 8K lbs axles. The brakes are not the limiting factor there, even the bearings are the same as the 7K axle, but a different tube/hub are on the 7K (and some 6K have the 8 lug hub). Brakes are not a determining factor on my trailer axles. This is why one must research their truck/trailer if they plan to exceed GVWR. All my research on pickups has lead me to the conclusion than brakes are based on GVWR, not FAWR+RAWR... The only time I have found it to not be true is looking at multiple GVWR's with the same brakes.. i.e. a 3/4 Ram has the same brakes as a DRW Ram in my year... or some cab configurations change GVWR for the same components. So the brakes are designed for the highest rated application. As far as DOT is concerned they don't care, at least here in Idaho, about any GVW or GAW... simply what I have registered for and what tires I have (and under 20K/axle). Beyond that it's up to me to be smart about loading. I know I have 9K worth of tires on my front axle, and I also know the axle itself can't go that high. Looking thru specs there isn't a single 3/4 or 1 ton SRW truck I can find that isn't tire limited. That takes everything into account. Most 1/2 tons are axle limited these days... in years past they have been tire limited but with all the 17-22" rims out there the tires hold a little more, even as LRB.
AH64ID 01/17/15 07:52am Towing
RE: Wheel Bearings Packed? Yearly Maintenance

I purchased my 24' tandem axle from a private party in 2012 who said new tires and bearing pack had been done earlier that year. I decided to wait til a full 2 yrs were up and do the bearings again in the spring of 2015. I don't know how far we went on a few trips, but certainly not "high" mileage. On a trip 100 miles out of town this summer (2014) the left rear wheel started smoking. Had to get a tow to tire shop where they said bearings needed repacked. So for me personally, I will do it once per year, or for certain no longer than 2 yrs if I keep track of usage closely. Just my opinion. That's one of the issues with repacking bearings. More often than not your better off just using the bearing buddy (if equipped)and leaving the bearings alone as far as dismantling everything IMHO. I can't count the number of posters who say they repack their bearings every year, every two years, etc., and when they take them out they really even didn't need repacking. I'm going the bearing buddy route and checking temps with an IR gun.
CKNSLS 12/30/14 01:58pm Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearings Packed? Yearly Maintenance

I purchased my 24' tandem axle from a private party in 2012 who said new tires and bearing pack had been done earlier that year. I decided to wait til a full 2 yrs were up and do the bearings again in the spring of 2015. I don't know how far we went on a few trips, but certainly not "high" mileage. On a trip 100 miles out of town this summer (2014) the left rear wheel started smoking. Had to get a tow to tire shop where they said bearings needed repacked. So for me personally, I will do it once per year, or for certain no longer than 2 yrs if I keep track of usage closely. Just my opinion.
retiredcamper2011 12/30/14 11:26am Travel Trailers
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