RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for 'pack bearings wheel' found 73 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 4  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Advice in Trailer Life's RV Clinic

EZ Lube and Bearing Buddies are designed to allow the owner to pack grease into the outer void of the wheel hub to prevent the Lake Water from getting into the bearing hub assbly. They are NOT to be used to "clean/PACK" the actual bearings. When you PACK a bearing you are forcing the OLD grease out and pushing in new grease. That cannot happen with an EZ lube or Bearing Buddy. If you try, it will bulge out/blow out the axle seals. Then you will have one heck of a greasy mess all over and on the brake shoes. Doug
dougrainer 08/24/15 12:46pm Tech Issues
RE: Disappointed!!!!!!!

We are a year and a half into our "NEW" 2014 Forest River Rockwood 5th wheel. 1st thing the amplifier to the tv wasn't wired correctly, fixed it myself. 2nd thing this one I thought as major, dining slide would not go out. Called coachnet, They told me as long as the slide was in to take it to the dealer. Purchased in Orlando FL, RV is in Texas, could not find a local dealer to look at it without a four to six week wait. Trip ruined so we took it home, a 300 mile trip from where we were, I had a look at it. Broken gear pack under the slide, ordered from FR and within four days had the slide back in operation. My biggest gripe is the cheap tires they put on these rigs. Had a tire that would not hold air. Went to Discount Tire, when they took it off the rim the bead was crumbling. The capacity of the stock tires was just enough to hold the weight of the rv as long as it was hitched up with the pin weight on the truck. Needless to say I replaced all four with a quality heavier tire that will support 20% more than the GVW of the RV. After checking the spare and having to add air to it a few times there is another tire purchase in my very near future. A number of other small things, so far everything was fixed by yours truly. Prior to this unit we purchased a used 5th wheel. The only thing I did to the used unit in three years was to grease the bearings and adjust the brakes.
PhoneDude 8289 08/05/15 10:56pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply... Actually you didn't. You're confused. It was Dog you asked, and he answered you. But since you seem to want to know from me, I will tell you. As several posters have already said, axel makers have no idea what their axles are going to be put on. Couple that with the fact that you can be sued for making a hair dryer and not having a label on it that states: "DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT IN THE SHOWER." I do all my own work. I check my trailer bearings and brakes about every 7 to 10 years. When I say check, I mean just that, check, not pack. I put about 4 to 5K on my trailer/ year. It goes something like this: It's been 7 years since I have checked my bearings, time to check them. I pop a hub cap off and take the nut off and pull the drum. I look over the brakes and also the bearings. In 28 years I have owned the same trailer I have NEVER seen anything wrong with the bearings. They have OEM bearings in it. In fact, they pretty much look the same as when I packed them. No rust, grease where is should be, the proper amount of grease, seals look good..........good to go. The brakes on the other hand have wear on them. Not so much the shoes, but the other hardware. Especially the magnets. They are the biggest wear item by far. This is the main reason I pull the drums that often. Because of the wear on the brake hardware. As far as when should "you" look at your bearings? I have no idea? I don't know how you use your trailer? I suggest if you used your trailer like these guys do, you check them every trip; and ALSO your TV bearings! You should know what your bearing look like if you check them every year. What do they look like when you check them? Or do you do your own work? Like I said, it's a sealed system. If the seals are in good shape it won't allow contamination in and grease out so the bearings remain in good shape. Oh, and to people that say they are not the same bearings, load, bla, bla bla. Not true. TV's can have cartridge bearings or packable bearings in them. Trailers can have packable bearings or cartridge bearings in them. (right Dog :B )They are both designed for weight and load for what they are used for. If anybody thinks that a trailer sees more side load think about this: A truck going into a turn at 40 or 50 MPH. Think of the side load at that speed. It's enormous!!! Like I said, it's a red herring anyway. I have yet to see a bearing fail do to side loading and I have seen a bunch. Besides, the fact that they both are designed for load and stress they are put through. As far as the Lippert schedule: Is this the same company that built these great frames? :B I think I will stay away from this companies recommendation as far as I can! A few people on this forum have junk trailers because of this companies gross incompetence. cmcdar I now have answered your question but you didn't answer mine: Do you pack or check you wheel bearings on your TV every year? Also, do you do your own work or do you rely on others for that? I have posted here several times and even posted pictures of the 'dry' bearings/hubs I found. YES I have checked, repacked my own bearings. I have previously explained that I have seasonally camped for 17 years However, towing a camper to different locations and maintaining a roadworthy travel trailer is new to me. I have checked and repacked camper bearings just once since I have only owned my camper since March. I plan to check it at least yearly to begin with. Now, you certainly are impressive with all of your experience and 'knowledge'. It baffles me, however, that you seem to not be able to comprehend that the general public lacks the very basic level of mechanical inclination to be able to understand what you are even talking about. If you are able to intuitively determine that every seven years is right for you, well wonderful. If I had not checked the bearings on my 'new to me' camper, I would likely have been in trouble my first time out as there was barely any grease and what was there was all broken down. I am not someone who is neurotic about most maintenance but I sure as hell do not want to be irresponsible either. New People to camping may have never towed a vehicle. They have no idea that the 'new' tires they bought 5 years ago and only have 100 miles on them, need to be replaced because they have dry rot. Many people out there on the road towing campers can barely change a lightbulb. Maintenance schedules are guidelines to follow. They are very important to the general public. Without recommendations, most people would NEVER even change their oil (still, many don't). You have sufficiently dazzled us with your abilities. Please leave some dignity for us regular folks who feel more comfortable going through life with some safety nets. I might remind you that you are the one that found "dry bearings" not me. I was just suggesting why you found such dry bearings. I have never found "dry bearings" with my maintenance schedule. Don't like it? Move on. You are free to follow any maintenance schedule you deem necessary. I find it amusing that you never did answer the question I have asked you twice now.
Turtle n Peeps 07/29/15 11:24pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply... Actually you didn't. You're confused. It was Dog you asked, and he answered you. But since you seem to want to know from me, I will tell you. As several posters have already said, axel makers have no idea what their axles are going to be put on. Couple that with the fact that you can be sued for making a hair dryer and not having a label on it that states: "DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT IN THE SHOWER." I do all my own work. I check my trailer bearings and brakes about every 7 to 10 years. When I say check, I mean just that, check, not pack. I put about 4 to 5K on my trailer/ year. It goes something like this: It's been 7 years since I have checked my bearings, time to check them. I pop a hub cap off and take the nut off and pull the drum. I look over the brakes and also the bearings. In 28 years I have owned the same trailer I have NEVER seen anything wrong with the bearings. They have OEM bearings in it. In fact, they pretty much look the same as when I packed them. No rust, grease where is should be, the proper amount of grease, seals look good..........good to go. The brakes on the other hand have wear on them. Not so much the shoes, but the other hardware. Especially the magnets. They are the biggest wear item by far. This is the main reason I pull the drums that often. Because of the wear on the brake hardware. As far as when should "you" look at your bearings? I have no idea? I don't know how you use your trailer? I suggest if you used your trailer like these guys do, you check them every trip; and ALSO your TV bearings! You should know what your bearing look like if you check them every year. What do they look like when you check them? Or do you do your own work? Like I said, it's a sealed system. If the seals are in good shape it won't allow contamination in and grease out so the bearings remain in good shape. Oh, and to people that say they are not the same bearings, load, bla, bla bla. Not true. TV's can have cartridge bearings or packable bearings in them. Trailers can have packable bearings or cartridge bearings in them. (right Dog :B )They are both designed for weight and load for what they are used for. If anybody thinks that a trailer sees more side load think about this: A truck going into a turn at 40 or 50 MPH. Think of the side load at that speed. It's enormous!!! Like I said, it's a red herring anyway. I have yet to see a bearing fail do to side loading and I have seen a bunch. Besides, the fact that they both are designed for load and stress they are put through. As far as the Lippert schedule: Is this the same company that built these great frames? :B I think I will stay away from this companies recommendation as far as I can! A few people on this forum have junk trailers because of this companies gross incompetence. cmcdar I now have answered your question but you didn't answer mine: Do you pack or check you wheel bearings on your TV every year? Also, do you do your own work or do you rely on others for that? Man, when this thread started out, I felt it was borderline trolling, now I'm sure it's full blown trolling. T&P, I'm really not sure why you're so concerned when people maintain their trailer bearings. If you feel they're wasting their time, what do you care? Does this create a disturbance in the force that somehow effects you? But, to answer some of your questions from my perspective: No, I don't pack the bearings in my tv. In fact, I've not had a vehicle with pack able bearings in any of my cars since the 70's. They've all been either FWD or 4WD. I believe most of the vehicles with packable bearings are RWD 2WD. I could be wrong, so don't slam me, just my observation based on the vehicles I've owned. Yes, I do pack the bearings on my trailer every year. I guess that disturbs you, but oh well. Maybe I'll bring my IR with me the next time I travel and really get your head spinning! You're wrong regarding the lateral forces on bearings on a TANDEM trailer v a car or truck. If you've ever seen a trailer making a tight turn, one tire is scrubbing one way, the other is scrubbing the other way. This, by the way, is one argument for having ST tires on a trailer with tandem axles. The STs don't provide the same traction as a LT tire, allowing it to slide sideways better, putting less strain in the bearings, axles, etc. Hate to break this to you, but what you're doing is not a proper bearing inspection. Do you even remove the inner bearing? How do you possible inspect the bearing without cleaning it off? Your posts are inconsistent. In an earlier post you stated you've packed the bearings maybe three times on a 29 yo trailer. Then you say you don't pack them every 7-10 years, you just do is magical inspection. Which is it? While I agree my annual cleaning, inspection and packing may be a little over the top, it hardly takes any time, is very inexpensive for me to do, and I'm practically guaranteed a trouble free camping season. I'm certainly not harming my trailer by performing this maintenance. So my question to you is, why do you care how others maintain their campers? The only reason I'd care would be if I was buying a trailer used. All other things equal, I'd go with the one maintained every year over one that gets this magical inspection every 7-10. Can we start a new thread entitled "why do people who ignore basic maintenance get upset when others don't?"
jfkmk 07/28/15 06:37pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

All that and you still did not answer if you pack your TV bearings every year like you do your trailer. :R I've looked at bearings that are older than 30 years and the grease was just fine. The difference in grease on the market is huge. I suggest you buy a quality grease if you are finding ""dry bearings" in a few years. Either that or you are using incompatible grease types together. This is particularly egregious on easy lube systems. People grab a grease gun off of their tool box and start jamming in who knows what type of grease and the next thing you know they are on the side of the road with dry bearings because of their actions. More than once I have seen chassis lube in wheel bearings because of these so called easy lube systems. :S
Turtle n Peeps 07/28/15 03:05pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply... Actually you didn't. You're confused. It was Dog you asked, and he answered you. But since you seem to want to know from me, I will tell you. As several posters have already said, axel makers have no idea what their axles are going to be put on. Couple that with the fact that you can be sued for making a hair dryer and not having a label on it that states: "DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT IN THE SHOWER." I do all my own work. I check my trailer bearings and brakes about every 7 to 10 years. When I say check, I mean just that, check, not pack. I put about 4 to 5K on my trailer/ year. It goes something like this: It's been 7 years since I have checked my bearings, time to check them. I pop a hub cap off and take the nut off and pull the drum. I look over the brakes and also the bearings. In 28 years I have owned the same trailer I have NEVER seen anything wrong with the bearings. They have OEM bearings in it. In fact, they pretty much look the same as when I packed them. No rust, grease where is should be, the proper amount of grease, seals look good..........good to go. The brakes on the other hand have wear on them. Not so much the shoes, but the other hardware. Especially the magnets. They are the biggest wear item by far. This is the main reason I pull the drums that often. Because of the wear on the brake hardware. As far as when should "you" look at your bearings? I have no idea? I don't know how you use your trailer? I suggest if you used your trailer like these guys do, you check them every trip; and ALSO your TV bearings! You should know what your bearing look like if you check them every year. What do they look like when you check them? Or do you do your own work? Like I said, it's a sealed system. If the seals are in good shape it won't allow contamination in and grease out so the bearings remain in good shape. Oh, and to people that say they are not the same bearings, load, bla, bla bla. Not true. TV's can have cartridge bearings or packable bearings in them. Trailers can have packable bearings or cartridge bearings in them. (right Dog :B )They are both designed for weight and load for what they are used for. If anybody thinks that a trailer sees more side load think about this: A truck going into a turn at 40 or 50 MPH. Think of the side load at that speed. It's enormous!!! Like I said, it's a red herring anyway. I have yet to see a bearing fail do to side loading and I have seen a bunch. Besides, the fact that they both are designed for load and stress they are put through. As far as the Lippert schedule: Is this the same company that built these great frames? :B I think I will stay away from this companies recommendation as far as I can! A few people on this forum have junk trailers because of this companies gross incompetence. cmcdar I now have answered your question but you didn't answer mine: Do you pack or check you wheel bearings on your TV every year? Also, do you do your own work or do you rely on others for that? I have posted here several times and even posted pictures of the 'dry' bearings/hubs I found. YES I have checked, repacked my own bearings. I have previously explained that I have seasonally camped for 17 years However, towing a camper to different locations and maintaining a roadworthy travel trailer is new to me. I have checked and repacked camper bearings just once since I have only owned my camper since March. I plan to check it at least yearly to begin with. Now, you certainly are impressive with all of your experience and 'knowledge'. It baffles me, however, that you seem to not be able to comprehend that the general public lacks the very basic level of mechanical inclination to be able to understand what you are even talking about. If you are able to intuitively determine that every seven years is right for you, well wonderful. If I had not checked the bearings on my 'new to me' camper, I would likely have been in trouble my first time out as there was barely any grease and what was there was all broken down. I am not someone who is neurotic about most maintenance but I sure as hell do not want to be irresponsible either. New People to camping may have never towed a vehicle. They have no idea that the 'new' tires they bought 5 years ago and only have 100 miles on them, need to be replaced because they have dry rot. Many people out there on the road towing campers can barely change a lightbulb. Maintenance schedules are guidelines to follow. They are very important to the general public. Without recommendations, most people would NEVER even change their oil (still, many don't). You have sufficiently dazzled us with your abilities. Please leave some dignity for us regular folks who feel more comfortable going through life with some safety nets.
cmcdar 07/28/15 01:42pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply... Actually you didn't. You're confused. It was Dog you asked, and he answered you. But since you seem to want to know from me, I will tell you. As several posters have already said, axel makers have no idea what their axles are going to be put on. Couple that with the fact that you can be sued for making a hair dryer and not having a label on it that states: "DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT IN THE SHOWER." I do all my own work. I check my trailer bearings and brakes about every 7 to 10 years. When I say check, I mean just that, check, not pack. I put about 4 to 5K on my trailer/ year. It goes something like this: It's been 7 years since I have checked my bearings, time to check them. I pop a hub cap off and take the nut off and pull the drum. I look over the brakes and also the bearings. In 28 years I have owned the same trailer I have NEVER seen anything wrong with the bearings. They have OEM bearings in it. In fact, they pretty much look the same as when I packed them. No rust, grease where is should be, the proper amount of grease, seals look good..........good to go. The brakes on the other hand have wear on them. Not so much the shoes, but the other hardware. Especially the magnets. They are the biggest wear item by far. This is the main reason I pull the drums that often. Because of the wear on the brake hardware. As far as when should "you" look at your bearings? I have no idea? I don't know how you use your trailer? I suggest if you used your trailer like these guys do, you check them every trip; and ALSO your TV bearings! You should know what your bearing look like if you check them every year. What do they look like when you check them? Or do you do your own work? Like I said, it's a sealed system. If the seals are in good shape it won't allow contamination in and grease out so the bearings remain in good shape. Oh, and to people that say they are not the same bearings, load, bla, bla bla. Not true. TV's can have cartridge bearings or packable bearings in them. Trailers can have packable bearings or cartridge bearings in them. (right Dog :B )They are both designed for weight and load for what they are used for. If anybody thinks that a trailer sees more side load think about this: A truck going into a turn at 40 or 50 MPH. Think of the side load at that speed. It's enormous!!! Like I said, it's a red herring anyway. I have yet to see a bearing fail do to side loading and I have seen a bunch. Besides, the fact that they both are designed for load and stress they are put through. As far as the Lippert schedule: Is this the same company that built these great frames? :B I think I will stay away from this companies recommendation as far as I can! A few people on this forum have junk trailers because of this companies gross incompetence. cmcdar I now have answered your question but you didn't answer mine: Do you pack or check you wheel bearings on your TV every year? Also, do you do your own work or do you rely on others for that?
Turtle n Peeps 07/28/15 12:14pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today. OK, So the manufacturer is wrong.... how often do YOU recommend? It's not about the manufacturer being wrong. It's that the MFG of the Axles is using a WORST CASE scenario to base maintenance schedules on BECAUSE there is no way for them to know what kind of trailer any given axle will end up in. Those service schedules are for extreme duty. TT's just are by no definition extreme duty cycle platforms. SO, again, IF the manufacturers are being overly cautious, WHEN / HOW OFTEN do YOU naysayers believe is "often enough" (If ever) to check or re-pack bearings? You see, I am starting to believe you guys are just defending the fact that you do not check them (period). You have no better "schedule" to follow. I can only believe that you are saying don't ever even bother - just like with your tow vehicles (which is why I HATE buying used vehicles).
cmcdar 07/28/15 06:54am Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today. OK, So the manufacturer is wrong.... how often do YOU recommend? It's not about the manufacturer being wrong. It's that the MFG of the Axles is using a WORST CASE scenario to base maintenance schedules on BECAUSE there is no way for them to know what kind of trailer any given axle will end up in. Those service schedules are for extreme duty. TT's just are by no definition extreme duty cycle platforms.
4X4Dodger 07/28/15 06:40am Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today. OK, So the manufacturer is wrong.... how often do YOU recommend?That is a tough call. I will say that everyone should learn how to do this themselves. I think more failures are caused by repackings done incorrectly than from lack of maintainence. (and that includes a lot of shops) If done right, there is no reason that they cannot last as long as on a car. But.... Everyones usage is different. Some are just harder on things than others. Personally, I do mine at 2-4 years give or take.
Huntindog 07/27/15 06:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today. OK, So the manufacturer is wrong.... how often do YOU recommend?
cmcdar 07/27/15 01:37pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.I have read both manuals extensively... They giv a "blanket" recommendation. Many of their axles end up in other than RVs. Agricultural trailers, boat trailers etc. But the recommendation is the same for all of them. Surely you would agree that a boat trailer that is submerged in fresh and or salt weather needs more frequent service than an RV?? It is apparent that they set the service interval low, so that all users will service the bearings frequently... If they had different recommendations for different types of service, then there would be confusion on the part of the user. It really makes no sense that a TT bearing needs service much more often than an identical car bearing.... As for thae grease going bad from sitting.... What about the grease in the can in the garage? Or do you buy brand new grease for each repacking? Years ago, grease wasn't nearly as good as it is today, so it could deteriorate over time... Not so much today.
Huntindog 07/27/15 01:33pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling. Besides pm being better than emergency repairs, my annual repacking includes cleaning, inspecting and adjusting my manually adjusted drum brakes.
jfkmk 07/27/15 11:18am Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) Take a look at the links I posted. Both Dexter Axle and Lippert (probably account for 90%+ of RV axles) have a service schedule of 12mo/12k for the wheel bearings. I don't know of any automaker that has any bearing interval in their service manual. Most have went to sealed bearings anyway and you replace that whole assembly when it starts howling.
itguy08 07/27/15 10:37am Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

Ok, this thread is getting off base. What I want to know is "why the fascination with trailer bearings?" Specifically for those people that gun their trailer bearings every stop why don't you gun your TV bearings at every stop? Specifically for those of you that pack your bearings every year, why don't you pack your bearings on your TV every year? (For those that don't have cartridge type bearings) For those of you that have your trailer bearings packed every year and still gun your bearing at every stop all year long. Why? Do you not trust your tech to do a good job? To me, this would be like checking your lug nuts every 100 miles after you get your tires replaced until those tires wear out. :h (My TT actually has a sticker on it that say's "check lug nuts every 50 miles!!!!") If I followed this to the letter I would have to pull over about 6 times a day while on vacation and pull the hub caps 24 times and check 120 lug nuts...............per day!!! Ya, right. :R And now for some of the failures I have seen when doing wheel bearings for other people or used trailers I have purchased: A high percentage that I have seen is contamination. I see this mostly on boat trailers. Water gets in a causes a mess. Pitting starts removing the hard facing and then the bearing fails. I've seen a few on other trailers that have bad seals and dirt gets in them an they fail. But far and away it was water contamination. A fairly low percentage is old grease or a poor quality grease. This I saw a lot on old, old, old trailers (think 30, 40 or more year old with 50's grease in them) like utility trailer and the like. They may have not been used in many, many years and someone decides to put them back in service without pulling a hub. All the grease by this time has gassed off and it's just some dried up waxy stuff trying to lube the bearings. That doesn't cut it so the bearing ends up failing. Another very high percentage is incompetence. Either the spindle nut is too tight and the friction is so high the bearing heats up and it smokes the bearing or the spindle nut is so loose the wheel flops around and beat the bu-gesues out of the rollers and race and the bearings fail. IMHO this is why you see failures in states that mandate inspections. I feel sorry for you that have to go through this mess each year. "Usually" the shops that do this don't put their smartest or best tech on doing this job and it shows. Another is ignorance. The owner sees easy lube hubs on their trailer and has a, so if a little is good more must be great attitude. They push the back seal out and dirt/ water, sand or other things get in the bearing and boom, bearing failure from contamination. In any event, I just wanted to hear from those that get out with their ray gun at each stop and gun only their trailer bearings and not their TV bearings. "I" suspect it's like the guy that cranks his 2015 diesel up in the morning and lets it idle for 45 minutes because he doesn't want to hurt his cold engine because he has been driving diesels since 1955 and that's the way he has always done it. Or the guy that uses synthetic oil in his 2014 pickup and changes it at 3000 miles because he doesn't trust that thing that pops up on the dash that tells him when to change his out. After all, the guy at Quick Lube says he knows what's best for your truck! :S
Turtle n Peeps 07/27/15 10:28am Travel Trailers
RE: re-packing greasing the bearings / axle

If it's impossible to get grease to the inner bearings without disassembly or an easy lube ( that's where the spindle is line bored carrying grease to in between the 2 bearings, right? Help the clueless), then how can one push out the grease seal on a hub with bearing buddy's.. The spindle is not line bored it is drilled. The EZ Lube system does not inject grease between the 2 bearings. It is injected between the back of the bearing and the lip seal. This seems to be what creates the issue with blowing the seal out. I hand pack because I do not want to take a chance of blowing out the seal and I do not want the entire cavity full of grease. Just my opinion. Op, any auto repair shop can repack your bearings. Call a couple for price. May be cheaper and quicker than a RV dealer. Correct and to further illustrate this, here is a pic of the spindle of an E-Z lube axle and you can see the zerk fitting on the end of the spindle where you pump in the grease. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreaseoriginal_zpsf30322c8.jpg width=600 Below is a picture of the hole where the grease comes out. The grease goes into the zerk thru the center of the axle and exits that hole. It is located just inside of the grease seal that rides up on that flat portrion in the picture and the grease inters the area between the larger diameter of the inside bearing and the grease seal. This is why one has to be EXTREMELY CAREFUL and follow carefully the directions such as rotating as you pump (which takes two people since one needs to be rotating the wheel while the other pumps the grease SLOWLY) and ONLY USING a hand pump grease gun since a powered one can force the grease into that small area too fast and blow past the grease seal. This significant downside is still there even with hand pumping if the conditions are just right. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreasehole1_zps89b35ea4.jpg width=600 Here is another picture of that exit point with some grease coming out of the hole in the axle. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Spindlegreasehole2_zps2f2652c3.jpg width=600 Now to the meat of the main issues with these E-Z lube axles. To analyze this at my first bearing service after I carefully cleaned all the bearings I pump grease into the zerk to just where it starts to come out of that hole. I then installed a completely dry bearing and the old grease seal into the hub and mounted the hub to the axle. To properly document a snapshot I then did TWO FULL STROKE pump on a standard hand grease gun w/o rotating the hub since I wanted to get a feeling for how much grease actually got to the bearing. This was because there had been multiple posts like yours where individuals were giving their axles one to like five pumps of grease and thinking they had actually done anything. I was appalled at the result. Below in just how much grease you get in that area with those two full pumps I described above. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Twopumpgrease_zps59a5876e.jpg width=600 As they say a picture is worth a thousand words.:p Now here are the real issues and why these E-Z lube axles are a great idea, with poor execution and dismal effectiveness. To even have a hope of being effective the entire void between the two bearing inside the hub cavity has to be 100% packed with grease w/o voids or air pockets. The only way I can even think to accomplish this is to some how install the hub with the inner bearing and grease seal installed leaving the outside bearing out and then somehow stuff grease into that cavity ensuring you don't have any voids or air pockets. This is critical since the how concept of these axles is to pump grease into that zerk with it coming out at that inner cavity and forcing enough grease out thru the hub and thru the outer bearing so you replace a large amount of grease in each bearing. No body says how much grease you should see come out from zerk end of the axle thru the outer bearing. Also, there is absolutely no way to tell for sure if the grease pumped in or expelled has been evenly distributed around each bearing. This requires IMO a whole lot of HOPE and some serious PRAYING. I will readily admit I didn't document as well as I could exactly how much grease one wastes in filling that hub void around the axle between the two bearings and on some more noodling my first SWAG of close to two tubes for 4 wheels once everything is said and done is I think closer to being right that my second SWAG of 1/3 tube per wheel or 1 and 1/3 tubes for 4 wheels. There is a lot of space around that axle between the bearings that must be 100% filled with grease and in any event ALL THAT GREASE in there is WASTED since that is not used with a normal hand pack bearing service. I won't even get into how you initially fill up the cavity initially w/o leaving air pockets or voids and am still wanting to see how someone SLOWLY PUMPS in grease while SIMULATANOUSLY ROTATING the wheel so you evenly distribute the grease around the bearing and don't accidently try and force a lot of grease at a concentrated spot with the least point of resistance probably being that immediate grease seal since what you are doing is forcing the grease against that seal and HOPING is pushes grease the entire length of the hub and out the outer bearing area. SORRY anyone logically looking at what is required and what is to be accomplished that wouldn't have nightmares is IMO just not RIGHT INSIDE as the ole car commercial said. My bottom line recommendation is to ignore the EZ Lube capability and just do a regular normal disassembly, inspect and hand pack. One final comment is that even whether your trailer comes with the EZ-lube feature or not I would also recommend doing a bearing service very soon if never done before because the amount of grease from the factory might not only keep you up at night but cause you nightmares. Below are a series of pics I took at my first service on a new trailer documenting just how little grease the factory put in. Note the scarce amount in the grease seal in the first two pics. All these pics were as found with no removal of any of the original grease from the factory and the trailer has less than 4,000 miles total on it since new. http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Bearing%20grease%20original%205_zpsrgjkqmd1.jpg width=400 http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Bearing%20grease%20original%204_zpseitzptpb.jpg width=400 http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Bearing%20grease%20original%203_zps7suimz6q.jpg width=400 http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Bearing%20grease%20original%202_zps5gjrxpkd.jpg width=400 http://i1325.photobucket.com/albums/u639/12491/E%20Z%20Lube/Bearing%20grease%20original%201l_zps1crtu6ui.jpg width=400 Larry
LarryJM 07/12/15 04:41am Beginning RVing
RE: E-Z Lube Axles

You aren't missing anything Ron3rd, like I said on page one, the EZ-Lubes save me time and money. Some get it, some don't. Not calling anybody out, but all I see from the diagram on the system is a narrow hole in the center where grease flows, I don't see any hub to fill with grease. Maybe there are different types and folks confuse the two. The instructions that I got from Dexter are like the video but I have not touched the hubs yet to see how it works. You need to look closer... the grease comes out between the back bearing and the grease seal. Grease must travel thru the back bearing, fill up the hub center and then go thru the front bearing to lubricate it... all without blowing the grease seal. Personal experience... seal failure and lubing the brakes makes me a forever hand pack guy. :) Ditto for me on the seal failure. Full wheel pull for inspection and hand packing this year. After lubing via zerks the past two years, 3 of 4 (2 really bad) brake assemblies were very well greased....... Was it operator error? Can't say for sure but hand pumping and wheel rotation was executed. BUT, the bearings were in great shape! Back to hand packing for me. And yes they were Dexter double seals. I think it might be critical to pump the grease when the wheels and temps outside are warm to allow the new grease to flow a little better. Think about how much pressure is used to push the grease forward to the outer bearing and NOT past the seals which are operating upon friction to achieve a positive seal.
peirek 07/06/15 04:04pm General RVing Issues
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

A couple pumps would be plenty with that few of miles. I know you don't want to over do it. JMHOA couple pumps will do almost nothing. The grease goes in the backside between the seal and the rear bearing. To do a proper job you need to jack it up and rotate the wheel while pumping grease in my hand. It will take about 1/2 a tube to fill the cavity between the bearings and force some grease through and out of the front bearing. This is how they work. Once filled then a few pumps might do the job. I prefer to pack mine the old fashioned way. B.O. I assumed they had grease in them all ready. He has been using the trailer. B.O. is likely correct, as many new trailers, including mine, have barely enough grease in the new bearings, to get them delivered to the dealer. It may take 50 pumps, to fill the EZ-lube system, yes, half a tube. In any case, you need to add to the EZ-lube, until you see grease movement around the outer bearing, by the grease gun tip. Once the hub cavity has been filled, you should see some grease movement after just several strokes of the gun. Jerry Okay you fellows are probably correct then. Seems silly any manufacturer would send the units out like that.
dave17352 06/30/15 06:23am Fifth-Wheels
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

A couple pumps would be plenty with that few of miles. I know you don't want to over do it. JMHOA couple pumps will do almost nothing. The grease goes in the backside between the seal and the rear bearing. To do a proper job you need to jack it up and rotate the wheel while pumping grease in my hand. It will take about 1/2 a tube to fill the cavity between the bearings and force some grease through and out of the front bearing. This is how they work. Once filled then a few pumps might do the job. I prefer to pack mine the old fashioned way. B.O. I assumed they had grease in them all ready. He has been using the trailer. B.O. is likely correct, as many new trailers, including mine, have barely enough grease in the new bearings, to get them delivered to the dealer. It may take 50 pumps, to fill the EZ-lube system, yes, half a tube. In any case, you need to add to the EZ-lube, until you see grease movement around the outer bearing, by the grease gun tip. Once the hub cavity has been filled, you should see some grease movement after just several strokes of the gun. Jerry
MFL 06/30/15 05:27am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Brake Caliper Kit

I am a shade tree mechanic and have pulled, rebuilt, and installed new pads on 4 3/4 and 1 ton trucks, and 6 older cars (1968-1995) before I got hurt and cannot do that kind of work anymore. Now with that said, you could purchase all the necessary tools to do the job yourself, but you admit to knowing nothing about brakes. So my recommendation is to take it to a qualified mechanic shop to have it fixed. In my experience, trying to fix only one side leads to problems. You have to do both sides, install new pads, turn the rotors, and re-pack the wheel bearings. If you persist in trying to do this your self, just purchase new calipers instead of trying to rebuild them. They are more complicated than the old slave cylinders of drum brakes. The new calipers should have new pads installed already so you have the complete package. Then all you need to do is pull the rotors and get them turned, repack the front bearings, install new bearing seals, and put everything back together. You should plan on a whole week for this process as shops that turn rotors do them in the order received and if they are good, it could be several days before they get to yours. Good luck with your decision and choose to be safe and not cheap.
Grandpere 06/30/15 01:50am Class C Motorhomes
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 4  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2015 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS