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 > Your search for 'pack bearings wheel' found 62 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: E-Z Lube Axles

You aren't missing anything Ron3rd, like I said on page one, the EZ-Lubes save me time and money. Some get it, some don't. Not calling anybody out, but all I see from the diagram on the system is a narrow hole in the center where grease flows, I don't see any hub to fill with grease. Maybe there are different types and folks confuse the two. The instructions that I got from Dexter are like the video but I have not touched the hubs yet to see how it works. You need to look closer... the grease comes out between the back bearing and the grease seal. Grease must travel thru the back bearing, fill up the hub center and then go thru the front bearing to lubricate it... all without blowing the grease seal. Personal experience... seal failure and lubing the brakes makes me a forever hand pack guy. :) Ditto for me on the seal failure. Full wheel pull for inspection and hand packing this year. After lubing via zerks the past two years, 3 of 4 (2 really bad) brake assemblies were very well greased....... Was it operator error? Can't say for sure but hand pumping and wheel rotation was executed. BUT, the bearings were in great shape! Back to hand packing for me. And yes they were Dexter double seals. I think it might be critical to pump the grease when the wheels and temps outside are warm to allow the new grease to flow a little better. Think about how much pressure is used to push the grease forward to the outer bearing and NOT past the seals which are operating upon friction to achieve a positive seal.
peirek 07/06/15 04:04pm General RVing Issues
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

A couple pumps would be plenty with that few of miles. I know you don't want to over do it. JMHOA couple pumps will do almost nothing. The grease goes in the backside between the seal and the rear bearing. To do a proper job you need to jack it up and rotate the wheel while pumping grease in my hand. It will take about 1/2 a tube to fill the cavity between the bearings and force some grease through and out of the front bearing. This is how they work. Once filled then a few pumps might do the job. I prefer to pack mine the old fashioned way. B.O. I assumed they had grease in them all ready. He has been using the trailer. B.O. is likely correct, as many new trailers, including mine, have barely enough grease in the new bearings, to get them delivered to the dealer. It may take 50 pumps, to fill the EZ-lube system, yes, half a tube. In any case, you need to add to the EZ-lube, until you see grease movement around the outer bearing, by the grease gun tip. Once the hub cavity has been filled, you should see some grease movement after just several strokes of the gun. Jerry Okay you fellows are probably correct then. Seems silly any manufacturer would send the units out like that.
dave17352 06/30/15 06:23am Fifth-Wheels
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

A couple pumps would be plenty with that few of miles. I know you don't want to over do it. JMHOA couple pumps will do almost nothing. The grease goes in the backside between the seal and the rear bearing. To do a proper job you need to jack it up and rotate the wheel while pumping grease in my hand. It will take about 1/2 a tube to fill the cavity between the bearings and force some grease through and out of the front bearing. This is how they work. Once filled then a few pumps might do the job. I prefer to pack mine the old fashioned way. B.O. I assumed they had grease in them all ready. He has been using the trailer. B.O. is likely correct, as many new trailers, including mine, have barely enough grease in the new bearings, to get them delivered to the dealer. It may take 50 pumps, to fill the EZ-lube system, yes, half a tube. In any case, you need to add to the EZ-lube, until you see grease movement around the outer bearing, by the grease gun tip. Once the hub cavity has been filled, you should see some grease movement after just several strokes of the gun. Jerry
MFL 06/30/15 05:27am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Brake Caliper Kit

I am a shade tree mechanic and have pulled, rebuilt, and installed new pads on 4 3/4 and 1 ton trucks, and 6 older cars (1968-1995) before I got hurt and cannot do that kind of work anymore. Now with that said, you could purchase all the necessary tools to do the job yourself, but you admit to knowing nothing about brakes. So my recommendation is to take it to a qualified mechanic shop to have it fixed. In my experience, trying to fix only one side leads to problems. You have to do both sides, install new pads, turn the rotors, and re-pack the wheel bearings. If you persist in trying to do this your self, just purchase new calipers instead of trying to rebuild them. They are more complicated than the old slave cylinders of drum brakes. The new calipers should have new pads installed already so you have the complete package. Then all you need to do is pull the rotors and get them turned, repack the front bearings, install new bearing seals, and put everything back together. You should plan on a whole week for this process as shops that turn rotors do them in the order received and if they are good, it could be several days before they get to yours. Good luck with your decision and choose to be safe and not cheap.
Grandpere 06/30/15 01:50am Class C Motorhomes
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

A couple pumps would be plenty with that few of miles. I know you don't want to over do it. JMHOA couple pumps will do almost nothing. The grease goes in the backside between the seal and the rear bearing. To do a proper job you need to jack it up and rotate the wheel while pumping grease in my hand. It will take about 1/2 a tube to fill the cavity between the bearings and force some grease through and out of the front bearing. This is how they work. Once filled then a few pumps might do the job. I prefer to pack mine the old fashioned way. B.O. I assumed they had grease in them all ready. He has been using the trailer.
dave17352 06/30/15 12:53am Fifth-Wheels
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

A couple pumps would be plenty with that few of miles. I know you don't want to over do it. JMHOA couple pumps will do almost nothing. The grease goes in the backside between the seal and the rear bearing. To do a proper job you need to jack it up and rotate the wheel while pumping grease in my hand. It will take about 1/2 a tube to fill the cavity between the bearings and force some grease through and out of the front bearing. This is how they work. Once filled then a few pumps might do the job. I prefer to pack mine the old fashioned way. B.O.
B.O. Plenty 06/29/15 08:33pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

Actually 10,000 miles a year is some pretty good towing. There are years we don't hit that as full timers. I am not sure what you are pulling or the weight, but to be extra safe you could grease/pack every year, even though you would probably be okay doing it closer to every 20,000 miles. x2 Its all about the miles. I have been using my Truck Camper for the past couple of years. My bearings on the 5th wheel were changed about 5k miles ago. I will not hesitate to use the 5th wheel without repacking the bearings. I think the 20k rule is good.
dave17352 06/28/15 07:34am Fifth-Wheels
How Often to Pack Wheel Bearings

How often should I get the wheel bearings repacked? Had to replace axles about a year ago and the guy told me I should probably repack the bearings once a year since I only take a few trips a year. Is that right? We usually take one major winter trip and one major summer trip, a couple of short trips ------ totalling around 10,000 miles/yr.
5thwheeleroldman 06/28/15 07:14am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Bearing Failure Memorial Day Weekend

You lucked out! So many times I have been on the other side of the counter telling someone their vacation is done because of parts availability or damage beyond repair. Not this kid! I always repack the bearings, surface the drums, and at least balance the tires on a new rig before the first outing..... I never trust the factory's pack or bearing adjustment and the drums are usually about as round as a football. Also carry a spare spring, shackle, bolts, and bushings for one wheel position on board. You have spares now........
Crazy Cooter 06/26/15 09:40pm Toy Haulers
RE: tires AND brakes on my four winds chevy 3500 chassis

Looking at rockauto.com, it hints to me that Chevy went to sealed wheel bearings for the front wheels. Be that true, I'd question the integrity of a shop which says they need packing. For anybody lurking, on many vehicles, the brake caliper bracket prevents removal of the rotor/hub, so they pack only the outer bearing. Job should be remove, clean, pack, install with new inner seals, both inner and outer bearings.
j-d 06/12/15 07:33pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: wheel grease seals

First of all thanks to all your replies I appreciate the input. To answer one question "how did I pack the back bearing without removing the seals". Answer: I gooped a bunch on my fingers and spread it into the bearing, now since I replaced the seals I took the bearings out inspected each one, one at a time and greased them very thoroughly with the palm of my hand. I know "Bearing Buddies" are good for boat trailers as I have them on my boat trailer. I believe the seals in the boat trailers are double lipped which give the seals more strength that can with stand more pressure especially when filling them up threw the zert. Yes I did over fill my bearings, when it takes 3/4 of a tube of grease per wheel you know something is going to give. So this will be a lesson for the school of hard knocks. The "Buddy Bearings" that I have installed will only get a squirt now and then. Nothing beats taking the hub off and visual inspection anyway! Thanks again to all the input, Happy RVing, be safe and keep the rubber side down..... Ray
Reelay 06/04/15 05:09pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: What to do? 5er not level w/ truck

**********UPDATE********** I spoke w/ Lippert and seems they changed things up. While they still have and sell the wet bolt kit, they now offer a Never-Fail bushing which is supposed to be vastly superior to the bronze bushing used w/ the wet bolt kit. The Never- Fail bushings are NOT compatible w/ the wet bolt kit and not sure which bolts would be used with them. If one buys a new Equa-Flex, the Never-Fails come std w/ it. Bronze bushings NOT sold separately! I cannot see buying 2 new Equa-Flexes just to get the new bushings. How long do the bronze ones last? Has to be much better then the plastic ones from factory. Was also told that in what I want to do, I have to "tap" (hammer) out the wet bolt from shackles due to the serrated edges on then. Can re-use them. Has anyone ever taken out the wet bolts? How hard did they come out? Seems to me if I recall right, they were a stinker going in and IMO probly have to grind them off in order to get them out. "Never-Fail" is probably equivalent to the "NevRLube" bearings, that you still have to re-pack. I think I'd stick to a standard wet bolt kit, but that's just me. I've replace a few wheel studs, that have splines below the head, and we'd simply leave the nut threaded on the end of the stud, and use that to drive the stud out, provided we didn't have a press handy. You could do the same and save the old bolts in your just-in-case box. Lyle
laknox 06/02/15 11:25am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Wheel Bearings on a 7 year old pop-up - Shuld I?

Guess those that question using a small amount of 90 gear oil have never heard of oil bath wheel bearings where that's all that's used. I've never heard of putting 90 weight oil on to loosen up old grease. I've just always re-did the bearings if questionable. Being I've already jacked trailer up, pulled the hub etc. You would think by now bearings and tires on anything towed would be as good as the TV. If nothing else the axle manufactures could put some type of inspection port on back side, so you didn't have to pull hub. As far as oil bath goes...If they made any for smaller sizes (RV size) I bet they would be better system. The only time we messed with them at work, was when they leaked or got crunched. But if I was starting out on a 2,000 mile trip with bearings that haven't been re-done in 7 years, I would re-pack and be done with it.
path1 06/02/15 09:14am Folding Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearings on a 7 year old pop-up - Shuld I?

You will probably not have to replace the wheel bearings but they should be taken out cleaned and packed and then replaced properly. Not that the miles are all that long but time breaks down everything even grease. So it's an easy job pick a nice sunny day put on the radio and clean and pack them you won't be sorry you did. JMO
diazr2 06/01/15 01:04pm Folding Trailers
RE: New trailer - most important upgrades in beginning

How far are you towing the trailer to go camp? TPMS and a temp gauge are not really needed especially for short trips. Keep your wheel bearings packed and tire pressures right and you won't have a problem. People tow 1000's of miles a year without TPMS or checking their wheel temps, heck most don't check their tire pressure or pack there wheel bearing every year or two. You have to remember that most guys that post to forums like this are hard core trailer dudes and the trailer is there hobbie and they like to play with there hobbie hinc all the extra stuff. Use your rig and decide for yourself what you need and don't need. Kind of funny if someone brings up nitrogen in the tires they are run off the forum but the same guys turn around and tell ya to get a TPMS system. Well I don't have the pressure fluctuations that air does with nitrogen so I am not always messing with air pressure in my truck or trailer when I go from 60 degree weather to 100 degree weather. My findings are the TPMS system will drive you crazy unless you have nitrogen in your tires and even then my TPMS system has been known to tell me I have a flat tire one minute then telling me the tire is fine the next so a good pressure gauge is a good idea.
Muddydogs 05/25/15 09:17pm Beginning RVing
RE: EZ Lube AND repacking the bearings

Yeap, the first sentence talks about submersible axles and the picture is of a boat trailer. This tells me these were originally designed for boat trailers, not RV's. Probably marketing departments thought it was a plus to install the axles in RV's. I had EZ lubes on my prior trailer and never used them after the brakes got greased the first year, and I didn't do it. Exactly. The EZ-Lube system makes it easy to pack the area around the bearings with grease, preventing water intrusion when the axle is submersed, as in launching a boat. Doing so risks extruding grease past the seals, fouling the brake linings, but most boat trailers don't have brakes. I repack wheel bearings once a year. Repacking yearly isn't really necessary, but Dexter recommends inspecting the bearings once a year, and of course the way to inspect them is to remove the grease. You can ignore the EZ-Lube fittings when repacking the bearings; they don't get in the way. You can ignore them the rest of the time, too. You should use the EZ-Lube system each time you submerge the RV. That is, hopefully never.
SailingOn 05/21/15 06:59pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Trip to Yellowstone

Again more great tips and suggestions. I'm a little concerned with the weight now if towing in the mountains makes a huge difference on pin weight. I'll get that checked next week. We've had the unit a year and camped about 12 trips, weight has never been an issue, half the time I forget its back there! But the mountains are a different animal, I will take the advice of those who have 'been there, done that'! Even though we've been on a dozen trips, there is probably no more than 3000-3500 miles on the rig. Would wheel bearings need repacked after that? They are supposed to be EZ Lube but it seems a little early for that! Mountains make zero difference on pin weight, either you have enough tire for the load or you don't. No need to let it scare you, just find out that you are working with before embarking on a long road trip. I would have the bearings repacked. Mosly because mos OE pack jobs leave a lot to be desired, IME.
AH64ID 05/17/15 08:46am Fifth-Wheels
RE: 2001 E-450 front calipers siezed-what now?

Ron, The 2008+ front disk bolts to the back of the hub like earlier ones, but I've never seen it sold separately The 2008+ front wheel bearings are serviced like earlier ones. Clean, Pack, New Seals, Nut, Nut Keeper, Cotter Key the Dust Cap If AutoZone's picture of Raybestos 68068 rear rotor is correct, the late model rotor is separated from the hub to replace. I'm not aware that the rear brakes get replaced by the 4*4 conversion shops, so those of us with New front brakes still have Old rear brakes, and the Master Cylinder still works with new fronts. BUT!!! Talking Rear brakes, the E350 DRW rear brake design differs from E450, at least in certain years. For one thing, the older E450's have the parking brake on the back of the transmission. E350 has parking brake shoes and so does the newer E450.
j-d 05/06/15 07:06am Class C Motorhomes
RE: 2001 E-450 front calipers siezed-what now?

I had a front caliper seize up just after leaving the ranger station check-in after a 50-mile highway run. Go figure. I went and got Hoses, Pads and Calipers for both sides. Changed the stuck side on the campsite (lucked out on that one) and the other side when I got home. After another couple runs, I could see the new pads weren't seating on the uncut rotors. Removed rotors, had them re-surfaced, packed bearings and installed new seals. Much better. I was NOT able to remove the Rotors before getting home to bigger tools than I had with me on the trip! The brackets keep them from coming off and are held with large metric bolts with 21mm (or 13/16") heads. Torque spec is 160-pounds and ours also had rust. As an aside, I believe some shops "re-pack wheel bearings" by doing only the outer ones... I'd change both calipers, all four pads, and both hoses. After a few miles, look and see if the overnight rust is being cleaned off both sides of both rotors. If not, have them re-surfaced. Unless they're discolored (blue) and/or checkered (surface cracked) then, replace. EDIT: Seeing the other replies, everybody's diagnosis is the same. Wanted to add, previous owners replaced rear calipers and I just had to do it again. Brake wasn't smokin' but had that burnt-electrical, slipping-clutch smell. REAR calipers aren't as easy to change as the fronts, and I don't mean just getting jacked up and dual wheels off. Up through 2007, Ford used key-type retaining hardware and the keys are a pain to drive out, worse to put back. 2008 and later uses slide bolts like the front. Maybe I should pay to have the backs done? I have the tools but some things are worth paying for.
Holiday27 05/04/15 07:25pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: 2001 E-450 front calipers siezed-what now?

I had a front caliper seize up just after leaving the ranger station check-in after a 50-mile highway run. Go figure. I went and got Hoses, Pads and Calipers for both sides. Changed the stuck side on the campsite (lucked out on that one) and the other side when I got home. After another couple runs, I could see the new pads weren't seating on the uncut rotors. Removed rotors, had them re-surfaced, packed bearings and installed new seals. Much better. I was NOT able to remove the Rotors before getting home to bigger tools than I had with me on the trip! The brackets keep them from coming off and are held with large metric bolts with 21mm (or 13/16") heads. Torque spec is 160-pounds and ours also had rust. As an aside, I believe some shops "re-pack wheel bearings" by doing only the outer ones... I'd change both calipers, all four pads, and both hoses. After a few miles, look and see if the overnight rust is being cleaned off both sides of both rotors. If not, have them re-surfaced. Unless they're discolored (blue) and/or checkered (surface cracked) then, replace. EDIT: Seeing the other replies, everybody's diagnosis is the same. Wanted to add, previous owners replaced rear calipers and I just had to do it again. Brake wasn't smokin' but had that burnt-electrical, slipping-clutch smell. REAR calipers aren't as easy to change as the fronts, and I don't mean just getting jacked up and dual wheels off. Up through 2007, Ford used key-type retaining hardware and the keys are a pain to drive out, worse to put back. 2008 and later uses slide bolts like the front.
j-d 05/04/15 07:12pm Class C Motorhomes
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