RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for 'pack bearings wheel' found 68 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 4  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: 2005 Mobile Suite 32TK3 + 2000 Ford F-250 Super Duty - OK?

We are picking up the truck on the morning of the 18th. Then, straight over to get the trailer. I then have 4 days to get all the techy stuff completed: Truck * new double din head unit touchscreen * new speakers all around (I have to; I'm an acoustical engineer) * amp * slim sub * inverter with custom cab USB & 110v outlets * set up solar w/ battery backup tire pressure and temperature monitor * install and hardwire dash cam * install wireless charging puck under center console * set up the back seat area for the Basset Hound and Mini Dacschund * add blackout curtains over their windows * home built security system that I can't tell you about or I would have to kill you * other stuff I can't recall right now 5th Wheel * install back up cam and wireless radio connecting to the screen in the cab * install a WiFi Ranger on the roof * install removable outdoor speakers * upgrade inside speakers (the stock units are atrocious) * toss out the Sony receiver, tube TV, VCR, and DVD changer * add Chromecast * add new receiver * install a HD projector inside ceiling cabinet above recliners * install microperf pull down screen in front of TV/electronics cabinet * install x-series encore ninja master speakers in TV/electronics cabinet * all new wiring for that stuff * install kegerator (2x sixtel or 1x 1/2 barrel) * install Kegbot flowmeter and tablet * add LED lighting to basement * add pair of 6v batteries * install solar panels on roof (non-permanent; can take down for ground positioning) * swap out commode for a composting type * new locks outside to replace the 751's * install new fireplace * check wheel bearings and repack as needed * set up my desk area * set up media server allowing access by any computer/phone anywhere to all music, movies, TV shows, books, games, & dailies of the stuff we will shoot on the trip, etc. * install retractable lines on the outside for the dogs * fabricate and install some basement organization stuff * more geeky custom security (I'm also an electrical and mechanical engineer - I'm all the engineers) * wrap some EL wire around our cruiser bicycles (she has a 2012 Schwinn and I ride a 1950 Colson Commander) * install a small cargo carrier on the 32tk3's hitch for the bikes and a gas can for the generator (+ more unobtrusive security) * fab a generator noise abatement box with some proprietary material from my audio company * weld up a muffler if I still think it is too loud (no, I'm not using a loud construction gen) * and the customary other **** I can't remember right now - Hit the scale to check weights (truck, pin, trailer). Alter pack out as needed. - Head out to a local spot - Horsetooth Reservoir for a shakedown. One day and night minimum. - After a week or so on the the trip, we will be stopping by some friends and I can change/add/delete anything that isn't working for us. - During the trip my wife will be updating all the fabrics inside the trailer, painting, and re-wallpapering. If any of that sounds too heavy or power intensive, it's cool; I've accounted for each pound and watt. That's it! edit: change formatting for reliability
The Skiing Ninjas 01/31/16 06:46pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Romex AND Outlets

The outlet on the left side is labeled with a sticker as a GFCI outlet but has no test or reset button and looks exactly like the outlet on the other side. :? It's probably GFI protected upstream in the circuit (likely the bathroom). FWIW, somebody should have at least suggested to the OP that a call to an electrician may be warranted. I'm all for DIY when it makes sense, but I get the feel from what I'm reading here that the OP should stay hands-off on this one. As a past Sparky in a previous lifetime, I can say with all honesty that I have not seen a recommendation to do what I would have done in this instance. Nor would I feel comfortable trying to explain it step by step in a forum. Be certain of what you are doing and do it safely when it comes to electricity. These things already go up like a matchstick without our help. I joined this forum to learn. Because of this forum I was able to hard wire a Progressive Industries EMS into the camper...learned how to pack wheel bearings...installed two Fantastic Vents...removed the oven and replaced with a new cooktop...installed shocks for the under bed storage...just to name a few. I learned by reading and asking questions and have saved a ton of money by not staying "hands off" and calling someone else to do the work and I plan to keep doing it that way. There are several intelligent people in this forum and I have not been steered wrong yet.
dmullen 01/12/16 05:28pm Travel Trailers
RE: Greaseable Wheel Bearings?

Great on boat trailers that get submerged under water. Terrible idea for rv type trailers. You will destroy your brakes using this method if not done properly and sparingly. RV Trailer bearings don't need constant attention like boat trailers anyway! How often do you pack the wheel bearings on your tow vehicle? What's the difference??
Likes to tow 12/31/15 08:12pm Tech Issues
RE: My bearing failure story

Scroll Down halfway to ALMAGARD 3752 You can follow the bouncing ball and buy single tubes online now http://products.lelubricants.com/category/all-industrial-greases CHEVRON RED GREASE NLGI No 2 https://cglapps.chevron.com/msdspds/PDSDetailPage.aspx?docDataId=77100&docFormat=PDF Forget what you read on the PDF page about Black Pearl wheel bearing grease. Chevron outright stole this formula from L.E. and Red Grease will spit in Black Pearl's face. Chevron has never been good at grease except for their stolen formula, Red Grease. Wish I could find the Red Grease in a small can rather than a tube. Both greases are virtually the same, even in color. Have lots of rags handy as this stuff is sticky. I use Brake Cleaner to spray down bearings that have been cleaned in solvent. Lab clean. Pack the big and the small end accesses to the bearing, keep revolving and keep packing. The bearings should be impossibly stiff to turn by hand when you're finished. Then take a good look at them, with good spindles and races, you won't be seeing them again, soon. These greases spit water out of them. I have taken a bearing, packed it good, hooked a 40 lb fishing line to it and tossed it out into 80F ocean salt water. A month or whothehellknows how much later, I pulled it in, wiped the grit off the grease and the bearing was like new. Coat a rod, boil water, whip the water into a froth and then remove the rod. Has any of the grease dribbled off? I lubed Jeeps with this stuff then spent a year of submerging the chassis up to the floorboards crossing streams, fording winter slush puddles two feet deep and a year or so later TRIED to re-lube ball joints, u-joints, etc. One slight twitch of a grease gun handle had brand new looking red grease forced out of the seals. Two year old new looking grease. It does make an impression on a person. Hey Mex... been following this thread... looking in stores... Chevron hard to find here... can find Lucas NLGI #2 that's also red... do you have an opinion on that grease? Tks
Puddles 12/11/15 11:26am Tech Issues
RE: My bearing failure story

Scroll Down halfway to ALMAGARD 3752 You can follow the bouncing ball and buy single tubes online now http://products.lelubricants.com/category/all-industrial-greases CHEVRON RED GREASE NLGI No 2 https://cglapps.chevron.com/msdspds/PDSDetailPage.aspx?docDataId=77100&docFormat=PDF Forget what you read on the PDF page about Black Pearl wheel bearing grease. Chevron outright stole this formula from L.E. and Red Grease will spit in Black Pearl's face. Chevron has never been good at grease except for their stolen formula, Red Grease. Wish I could find the Red Grease in a small can rather than a tube. Both greases are virtually the same, even in color. Have lots of rags handy as this stuff is sticky. I use Brake Cleaner to spray down bearings that have been cleaned in solvent. Lab clean. Pack the big and the small end accesses to the bearing, keep revolving and keep packing. The bearings should be impossibly stiff to turn by hand when you're finished. Then take a good look at them, with good spindles and races, you won't be seeing them again, soon. These greases spit water out of them. I have taken a bearing, packed it good, hooked a 40 lb fishing line to it and tossed it out into 80F ocean salt water. A month or whothehellknows how much later, I pulled it in, wiped the grit off the grease and the bearing was like new. Coat a rod, boil water, whip the water into a froth and then remove the rod. Has any of the grease dribbled off? I lubed Jeeps with this stuff then spent a year of submerging the chassis up to the floorboards crossing streams, fording winter slush puddles two feet deep and a year or so later TRIED to re-lube ball joints, u-joints, etc. One slight twitch of a grease gun handle had brand new looking red grease forced out of the seals. Two year old new looking grease. It does make an impression on a person.
MEXICOWANDERER 12/10/15 03:40pm Tech Issues
RE: My bearing failure story

GDETRAILER, car bearings are a different story,this guy and the rest of us are talking trailer, Car bearings ARE THE SAME THING AND IDEA, PERIOD. Car rear bearings (rear on front wheel drive, front on rear wheel drive and 4x2 trucks) ARE ONE IN THE SAME. They are the same "tapered" roller bearings and use GREASE. Per Dexter axle manual.. HERE "Dexter’s standard wheel bearing configuration consists of opposed tapered roller bearing cones and cups, fitted inside of a precision machined cast hub. This method of using tapered roller bearings requires that a minimal amount of axial end play be provided at assembly. This end play is essential to the longevity of the bearings service life. This design is typically lubricated with grease, packed into the bearings. Oil lubrication is another method which is available in some of the larger axle capacities." How many people that have front wheel drive vehicles actually ever check their rear axle bearings for heat? How many people actually pull, inspect and repack front wheel drive rear axle bearings?.. None to the first question and nearly zero to none on the second question. There is nothing different when comparing 4x2 front axle bearings and front wheel drive rear axle bearings to a trailer bearing when it comes to inspecting and repacking the bearing. Trailer axle manufacturers DO recommend 12K miles of every two years for removing, inspecting and repacking the bearings.. Done right you will not have a bearing failure. Done incorrectly or never done and you WILL eventually have a failure. As I mentioned above, PROPER packing the bearing with grease IS essential. Most mechanics (and a few DIYers) now days do not understand how to properly pack a bearing. THAT is the cause of most failures, in fact the garage I used that I had failures on my vehicle WERE FACTORY CERTIFIED ASE MECHANICS.. PER DEXTER MANUAL here is how they describe how to properly maintain the bearings.. "Along with bearing adjustment, proper lubrication is essential to the proper function and reliability of your trailer axle. Bearings should be lubricated every 12 months or 12,000 miles. The method to repack bearing cones is as follows: 1. Place a quantity of grease into the palm of your hand. 2. Press a section of the widest end of the bearing into the outer edge of the grease pile closest to the thumb forcing grease into the interior of the bearing. 3. Repeat this while rotating the bearing from roller to roller. 4. Continue this process until you have the entire bearing completely filled with grease. 5. Before reinstalling, apply a light coat of grease on the bearing cup" As you can tell I have not made up anything.. It is pretty much as I described.. As far as bearing adjustment here is what Dexter has to say.. "Bearing Adjustment and Hub Replacement If the hub has been removed or bearing adjustment is required, the following adjustment procedure must be followed. For standard grease or oil axles using cotter pin: 1. After placing the hub, bearings, washers, and spindle nut back on the axle spindle in reverse order as detailed in the previous section on hub removal, rotate the hub assembly slowly while tightening the spindle nut to approximately 50Ft. Lbs.(12" wrench or pliers with full hand force.) 2. Then loosen the spindle nut to remove the torque. Do not rotate the hub. 3. Finger tighten the spindle nut until just snug. 4. Back the spindle nut out slightly until the first castellation lines up with the cotter key hole and insert the cotter pin. 5. Bend over the cotter pin legs to secure the nut. 6. Nut should be free to move with only restraint being the cotter pin." With the exception of the actual torque spec and #6 instruction for looseness of the nut the steps that Dexter lists ARE the very same steps you do for ANY 4x2 vehicle which has tapered roller bearings.. Those steps are what my Dad SHOWED me nearly 35 years ago on my first CAR which by the way had drum brakes on the front axle..
Gdetrailer 12/09/15 08:01am Tech Issues
RE: i regret for trading my Snowriver TC

We started with a Northstar Arrow 8.5, DW wanted a couch so we bought a AF 25R TT and then got into solo canoes. Got a TracRac on the truck, put the canoes on the truck and it worked. We retired and our truck struggled a bit in the mountains so we downsized to an AF 22G, took the canoes with us and paddled in the western NP's, it was great. DW says, "you know we were more spontaneous with the TC", so we looked at triple slide TC's, too big. Back to Arctic Fox and she fell in love with the 990, it was just right. Back to a TC, no more ST tires to think about, no more wheel bearings to clean, pack and adjust, no brakes/brake wiring to worry about, no hitch to hook and unhook, etc., just get in and go!
GeoBoy 10/26/15 06:50pm Truck Campers
RE: Wheel Bearing Maintenance

Every other year for me also. I replace the seals about every 4 years. Never do I use the grease fitting!! This is great for boat trailers that get submerged in water but it will hose down your brake shoes if the seal is not 100%. Why would you go thru the trouble of repacking the bearings and not replace the seals? The seal has to be removed to remove the inner seal anyway and they don't cost much. Just curious. I don't actually pull the inside bearing out to pack in more grease. I only visually inspect and feel for the amount of grease it has, then grab some more grease with two fingers, go through the seal and pull the grease off my fingers as I withdraw my hand. I do this several times. I wipe some of the excess off with a clean towel. The outside bearing is of course removed when I pull the hub and I go through the routine of packing it with "grease in the palm of hand" method. In pulling boat trailers for over 50 years...I have never lost a bearing. I only pull my 5th wheel about 2000 miles a year. Every other year seems to work good on the bearings and every 4 years on the seals. The seals never show leakage. If I pulled more miles I would step up the schedule.
Likes to tow 10/23/15 05:49am Fifth-Wheels
RE: P30 (1984) Brake Question

Changed out the hose and put grease on the dry slides. Took an opportunity to re-pack the wheel bearings, put some grease in the upper ball joint and put it back together. Topped off the fluid after letting gravity get the air out of the new hose. It feels good and doesn't appear to be locking up anymore. So was it the slides or the hose? I guess I'll never know. A couple of weeks ago I pumped grease into the bell cranks and everywhere else I could. It really feels good on the road now. Next trip out is this coming Friday. Only 100 miles each way but that's enough in this old thing!
turbojimmy 10/04/15 12:30pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Help with my wheel hub please

Here is yet another case where repacking the bearings did more harm than good. All that was needed was to lube the bearings with a gun and inspect the brakes. Instead repacking was done and caused problems and looks like what could be a major expense for the OP. I have always said the same. Unless an owner truly knows what he is doing, or has a competent mechanic, that he trusts to do the job right, hand packing bearings is just too important to let the kid, with his cap on backwards, and his pants falling down, do this important task. Jerry Is that so? Interesting. I did find it curious that they cleaned them out and repacked them when there's a grease fitting right on them, but it sounded like a more thorough method of completing the job so I let them do it. I'll stick to greasing them myself from now on. I can just squeeze new grease in and old grease/contaminants/water will be pushed out, correct? Correct. Buy a $29.00 IR temperature gun at Harbor Freight. I check my hub temps at every stop. The hubs on the "sunny side" of the trailer will always run a little warmer. For some unknown reason(s)-some owners on here like to hand pack and mess with the tolerances when you can just use a grease gun. There are many videos online you can search to see exactly how the system works.There is no doubt that hand packing , done correctly is the best way. The grease gun method, though easier has it's downsides. First it takes a LOT of grease to do it the first time. You need to fill the hub cavity entirely before the grease will start to come out.. You also need to rotate the wheel while pumping te grease in. This is because there is only one hole where fresh grease will exit and enter the beaing.. In order to get fresh grease into the entire bearing, it needs to rotate around the grease hole. And this is for the inner bearing. The outer bearing is next in line to get grease... The grease it will get first is the old grease that was pushed out of the inner bearing... The first time or two you do it, the outer bearing will likely get fresh grease from the hub cavity, but from then on, it will get used grease.. Unless you pump until all the old is expelled ( a lot of grease). If one does it often, then I suppose that the used grease the outer bearing is getting will be fresh enough.. What ever you do... Pump it in very slow. Going too fast risks blowing grease past the seals and onto the brakes. I just recently got the EZ lube hubs and and still on the fence as to how I will do it. So-what happens if you choose not to rotate the wheel? Won't the grease still get disbursed as the assembly turns going down the road?NO. If you do not rotate the wheel, you will have just a small spot of fresh grease in the bearing. Any excess fresh grease will flow into the hub cavity. That small spot of fresh grease in the bearing will mix with the old grease as the bearing rotates on the road... But it being a very small percentage of the total grease in the bearing will have a minimal effect.
Huntindog 09/27/15 07:10pm Travel Trailers
RE: Help with my wheel hub please

Here is yet another case where repacking the bearings did more harm than good. All that was needed was to lube the bearings with a gun and inspect the brakes. Instead repacking was done and caused problems and looks like what could be a major expense for the OP. I have always said the same. Unless an owner truly knows what he is doing, or has a competent mechanic, that he trusts to do the job right, hand packing bearings is just too important to let the kid, with his cap on backwards, and his pants falling down, do this important task. Jerry Is that so? Interesting. I did find it curious that they cleaned them out and repacked them when there's a grease fitting right on them, but it sounded like a more thorough method of completing the job so I let them do it. I'll stick to greasing them myself from now on. I can just squeeze new grease in and old grease/contaminants/water will be pushed out, correct? Correct. Buy a $29.00 IR temperature gun at Harbor Freight. I check my hub temps at every stop. The hubs on the "sunny side" of the trailer will always run a little warmer. For some unknown reason(s)-some owners on here like to hand pack and mess with the tolerances when you can just use a grease gun. There are many videos online you can search to see exactly how the system works.There is no doubt that hand packing , done correctly is the best way. The grease gun method, though easier has it's downsides. First it takes a LOT of grease to do it the first time. You need to fill the hub cavity entirely before the grease will start to come out.. You also need to rotate the wheel while pumping te grease in. This is because there is only one hole where fresh grease will exit and enter the beaing.. In order to get fresh grease into the entire bearing, it needs to rotate around the grease hole. And this is for the inner bearing. The outer bearing is next in line to get grease... The grease it will get first is the old grease that was pushed out of the inner bearing... The first time or two you do it, the outer bearing will likely get fresh grease from the hub cavity, but from then on, it will get used grease.. Unless you pump until all the old is expelled ( a lot of grease). If one does it often, then I suppose that the used grease the outer bearing is getting will be fresh enough.. What ever you do... Pump it in very slow. Going too fast risks blowing grease past the seals and onto the brakes. I just recently got the EZ lube hubs and and still on the fence as to how I will do it. So-what happens if you choose not to rotate the wheel? Won't the grease still get disbursed as the assembly turns going down the road?
CKNSLS 09/27/15 06:55pm Travel Trailers
RE: Help with my wheel hub please

Here is yet another case where repacking the bearings did more harm than good. All that was needed was to lube the bearings with a gun and inspect the brakes. Instead repacking was done and caused problems and looks like what could be a major expense for the OP. I have always said the same. Unless an owner truly knows what he is doing, or has a competent mechanic, that he trusts to do the job right, hand packing bearings is just too important to let the kid, with his cap on backwards, and his pants falling down, do this important task. Jerry Is that so? Interesting. I did find it curious that they cleaned them out and repacked them when there's a grease fitting right on them, but it sounded like a more thorough method of completing the job so I let them do it. I'll stick to greasing them myself from now on. I can just squeeze new grease in and old grease/contaminants/water will be pushed out, correct? Correct. Buy a $29.00 IR temperature gun at Harbor Freight. I check my hub temps at every stop. The hubs on the "sunny side" of the trailer will always run a little warmer. For some unknown reason(s)-some owners on here like to hand pack and mess with the tolerances when you can just use a grease gun. There are many videos online you can search to see exactly how the system works.There is no doubt that hand packing , done correctly is the best way. The grease gun method, though easier has it's downsides. First it takes a LOT of grease to do it the first time. You need to fill the hub cavity entirely before the grease will start to come out.. You also need to rotate the wheel while pumping the grease in. This is because there is only one hole where fresh grease will exit and enter the beaing.. In order to get fresh grease into the entire bearing, it needs to rotate around the grease hole. And this is for the inner bearing. The outer bearing is next in line to get grease... The grease it will get first is the old grease that was pushed out of the inner bearing... The first time or two you do it, the outer bearing will likely get fresh grease from the hub cavity, but from then on, it will get used grease.. Unless you pump until all the old is expelled ( a lot of grease). If one does it often, then I suppose that the used grease the outer bearing is getting will be fresh enough.. What ever you do... Pump it in very slow. Going too fast risks blowing grease past the seals and onto the brakes. I just recently got the EZ lube hubs and and still on the fence as to how I will do it.
Huntindog 09/27/15 06:43pm Travel Trailers
RE: What are the good quality bearings for a TT?

I was going to ask, instead of worrying about good bearings, what is good, or the best lubricant to pack the bearings with. Red "Farm" Grease, the kind used everywhere on the farm, where bearing failure during harvesting season isn't an option? Many years ago, in cased bearings for skateboarding... Japanese bearings were very good, but the best bearings, rolling resistance wise, came out of Germany. It was noticeable, certainly, the glide effect on German bearings being the best, we tested many a skate board truck and wheel, by bearing brands, in the mid 1970's. Whether it was bearings or grease lube that the germans used, I don't know, but they rolled out the farthest, consistently. They were priced accordingly.
NinerBikes 09/27/15 11:01am Tech Issues
RE: wheel bearing lubrication

I'll do it for you for $40. Honestly, with all the right equipment it only takes a few minutes, so $45 sounds fair for the wheel bearing pack. But you need to ask the following question of both of them: 1. When you repack the bearings, are you replacing the grease seals with new ones? 2. Before you repack the bearings, are you thoroughly cleaning them to remove any old grease? 3. What method do you use to pack the new grease? By hand?, by machine?, by using a bearing buddy injector? 4. If your trailer has electric brakes, you need to understand if the price includes inspecting and adjusting the brakes? Different approaches can add different costs. You need to be an informed consumer and understand the approach of each of them.
TucsonJim 09/18/15 04:20pm Folding Trailers
Greasing tow trailer axles

I would like to grease the wheel bearings on my 2011 StarCraft TT. It has electric drum brakes. I bought Mystik No.2 Hi-Temp Multi Purpose Grease. Is this OK to use? My TT has the axle grease zerks. Someone told me pump in the grease until it comes out some type of port. Is this OK or should I hand pack the bearings? The trailer is 4 years old and besides an occasional shot of grease no other maintenance has been done on the wheel bearings.
davebr 09/18/15 03:17pm Travel Trailers
RE: Wheel Bearings on a 7 year old pop-up - Shuld I?

Before I dis-assemble things to repack the bearing, I use a punch to mark 12oclock on the retaining nut. When all is complete, I put that nut back to the same position. There should be no reason for the nut to be tighter or looser after a bearing re-pack. The wheel should spin freely, with just a hint of wobble. My test for too tight of a bearing is if I can't hold on to the hub at the first stop/50 miles, then it's too tight. Been there, done that with the first pop-up - had to repack bearings with fresh grease at the truck stop about 500 miles from home. Having brakes on the trailer will also generate heat, so you would minimize their use prior to checking the hub temp. I have seen more bad bearings from non-use (more motorcycles than trailers). If the grease hardens and moisture builds up on the bearing surfaces, those rusty bearings need replacing. As others have stated, if the grease looks like honey - its full of moisture. A good inspection should be done on the cleaned bearings and races prior to repack. Lastly, I would be worried if the wheel was looser after 100 miles than at the repack - what the heck moved to make it looser? If you don't mark the nut first, standard practice after a repack is to tighten up the nut, then loosen it until you get the little bit of wobble. Do this a second time to see if the rotation of the nut is in the same place when the wheel starts to wobble just to be sure. Sometimes with castle nuts, it may seem that you have a choice between too tight and too loose. Choose loose. Those of you afraid of a hint of wobble have never tried to induce wobble on a spinning bicycle wheel!
PopUpTom 08/29/15 09:42am Folding Trailers
RE: Advice in Trailer Life's RV Clinic

EZ Lube and Bearing Buddies are designed to allow the owner to pack grease into the outer void of the wheel hub to prevent the Lake Water from getting into the bearing hub assbly. They are NOT to be used to "clean/PACK" the actual bearings. When you PACK a bearing you are forcing the OLD grease out and pushing in new grease. That cannot happen with an EZ lube or Bearing Buddy. If you try, it will bulge out/blow out the axle seals. Then you will have one heck of a greasy mess all over and on the brake shoes. Doug
dougrainer 08/24/15 12:46pm Tech Issues
RE: Disappointed!!!!!!!

We are a year and a half into our "NEW" 2014 Forest River Rockwood 5th wheel. 1st thing the amplifier to the tv wasn't wired correctly, fixed it myself. 2nd thing this one I thought as major, dining slide would not go out. Called coachnet, They told me as long as the slide was in to take it to the dealer. Purchased in Orlando FL, RV is in Texas, could not find a local dealer to look at it without a four to six week wait. Trip ruined so we took it home, a 300 mile trip from where we were, I had a look at it. Broken gear pack under the slide, ordered from FR and within four days had the slide back in operation. My biggest gripe is the cheap tires they put on these rigs. Had a tire that would not hold air. Went to Discount Tire, when they took it off the rim the bead was crumbling. The capacity of the stock tires was just enough to hold the weight of the rv as long as it was hitched up with the pin weight on the truck. Needless to say I replaced all four with a quality heavier tire that will support 20% more than the GVW of the RV. After checking the spare and having to add air to it a few times there is another tire purchase in my very near future. A number of other small things, so far everything was fixed by yours truly. Prior to this unit we purchased a used 5th wheel. The only thing I did to the used unit in three years was to grease the bearings and adjust the brakes.
PhoneDude 8289 08/05/15 10:56pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply... Actually you didn't. You're confused. It was Dog you asked, and he answered you. But since you seem to want to know from me, I will tell you. As several posters have already said, axel makers have no idea what their axles are going to be put on. Couple that with the fact that you can be sued for making a hair dryer and not having a label on it that states: "DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT IN THE SHOWER." I do all my own work. I check my trailer bearings and brakes about every 7 to 10 years. When I say check, I mean just that, check, not pack. I put about 4 to 5K on my trailer/ year. It goes something like this: It's been 7 years since I have checked my bearings, time to check them. I pop a hub cap off and take the nut off and pull the drum. I look over the brakes and also the bearings. In 28 years I have owned the same trailer I have NEVER seen anything wrong with the bearings. They have OEM bearings in it. In fact, they pretty much look the same as when I packed them. No rust, grease where is should be, the proper amount of grease, seals look good..........good to go. The brakes on the other hand have wear on them. Not so much the shoes, but the other hardware. Especially the magnets. They are the biggest wear item by far. This is the main reason I pull the drums that often. Because of the wear on the brake hardware. As far as when should "you" look at your bearings? I have no idea? I don't know how you use your trailer? I suggest if you used your trailer like these guys do, you check them every trip; and ALSO your TV bearings! You should know what your bearing look like if you check them every year. What do they look like when you check them? Or do you do your own work? Like I said, it's a sealed system. If the seals are in good shape it won't allow contamination in and grease out so the bearings remain in good shape. Oh, and to people that say they are not the same bearings, load, bla, bla bla. Not true. TV's can have cartridge bearings or packable bearings in them. Trailers can have packable bearings or cartridge bearings in them. (right Dog :B )They are both designed for weight and load for what they are used for. If anybody thinks that a trailer sees more side load think about this: A truck going into a turn at 40 or 50 MPH. Think of the side load at that speed. It's enormous!!! Like I said, it's a red herring anyway. I have yet to see a bearing fail do to side loading and I have seen a bunch. Besides, the fact that they both are designed for load and stress they are put through. As far as the Lippert schedule: Is this the same company that built these great frames? :B I think I will stay away from this companies recommendation as far as I can! A few people on this forum have junk trailers because of this companies gross incompetence. cmcdar I now have answered your question but you didn't answer mine: Do you pack or check you wheel bearings on your TV every year? Also, do you do your own work or do you rely on others for that? I have posted here several times and even posted pictures of the 'dry' bearings/hubs I found. YES I have checked, repacked my own bearings. I have previously explained that I have seasonally camped for 17 years However, towing a camper to different locations and maintaining a roadworthy travel trailer is new to me. I have checked and repacked camper bearings just once since I have only owned my camper since March. I plan to check it at least yearly to begin with. Now, you certainly are impressive with all of your experience and 'knowledge'. It baffles me, however, that you seem to not be able to comprehend that the general public lacks the very basic level of mechanical inclination to be able to understand what you are even talking about. If you are able to intuitively determine that every seven years is right for you, well wonderful. If I had not checked the bearings on my 'new to me' camper, I would likely have been in trouble my first time out as there was barely any grease and what was there was all broken down. I am not someone who is neurotic about most maintenance but I sure as hell do not want to be irresponsible either. New People to camping may have never towed a vehicle. They have no idea that the 'new' tires they bought 5 years ago and only have 100 miles on them, need to be replaced because they have dry rot. Many people out there on the road towing campers can barely change a lightbulb. Maintenance schedules are guidelines to follow. They are very important to the general public. Without recommendations, most people would NEVER even change their oil (still, many don't). You have sufficiently dazzled us with your abilities. Please leave some dignity for us regular folks who feel more comfortable going through life with some safety nets. I might remind you that you are the one that found "dry bearings" not me. I was just suggesting why you found such dry bearings. I have never found "dry bearings" with my maintenance schedule. Don't like it? Move on. You are free to follow any maintenance schedule you deem necessary. I find it amusing that you never did answer the question I have asked you twice now.
Turtle n Peeps 07/29/15 11:24pm Travel Trailers
RE: What's the fascination with trailer bearings?

It's funny that it seems irritating to some that several folks are fastidious about maintenance and safety. Why should this bother anyone? It should bother people that there are many out there that are willfully ignorant of even the most basic safety recommendations and regulations. In other words, if I repack my bearings every year - why should this matter to you? LOL, if you talking to me I'm not irritated at all. I really don't care if you pack your bearings every night at the campground. I just find it fascinating that when I ask people if they do the same with their TV I get a blank gaze with an open mouth. The question for you is: You say you pack your trailer bearings every year because it has to do with "fastidious maintenance and safety". Do you repack your TV bearings every year too? I have asked you, if you do not agree with manufacturer's recommendations, how often do YOU think it should be done? Ever? Never? ...waiting for reply... Actually you didn't. You're confused. It was Dog you asked, and he answered you. But since you seem to want to know from me, I will tell you. As several posters have already said, axel makers have no idea what their axles are going to be put on. Couple that with the fact that you can be sued for making a hair dryer and not having a label on it that states: "DO NOT USE THIS PRODUCT IN THE SHOWER." I do all my own work. I check my trailer bearings and brakes about every 7 to 10 years. When I say check, I mean just that, check, not pack. I put about 4 to 5K on my trailer/ year. It goes something like this: It's been 7 years since I have checked my bearings, time to check them. I pop a hub cap off and take the nut off and pull the drum. I look over the brakes and also the bearings. In 28 years I have owned the same trailer I have NEVER seen anything wrong with the bearings. They have OEM bearings in it. In fact, they pretty much look the same as when I packed them. No rust, grease where is should be, the proper amount of grease, seals look good..........good to go. The brakes on the other hand have wear on them. Not so much the shoes, but the other hardware. Especially the magnets. They are the biggest wear item by far. This is the main reason I pull the drums that often. Because of the wear on the brake hardware. As far as when should "you" look at your bearings? I have no idea? I don't know how you use your trailer? I suggest if you used your trailer like these guys do, you check them every trip; and ALSO your TV bearings! You should know what your bearing look like if you check them every year. What do they look like when you check them? Or do you do your own work? Like I said, it's a sealed system. If the seals are in good shape it won't allow contamination in and grease out so the bearings remain in good shape. Oh, and to people that say they are not the same bearings, load, bla, bla bla. Not true. TV's can have cartridge bearings or packable bearings in them. Trailers can have packable bearings or cartridge bearings in them. (right Dog :B )They are both designed for weight and load for what they are used for. If anybody thinks that a trailer sees more side load think about this: A truck going into a turn at 40 or 50 MPH. Think of the side load at that speed. It's enormous!!! Like I said, it's a red herring anyway. I have yet to see a bearing fail do to side loading and I have seen a bunch. Besides, the fact that they both are designed for load and stress they are put through. As far as the Lippert schedule: Is this the same company that built these great frames? :B I think I will stay away from this companies recommendation as far as I can! A few people on this forum have junk trailers because of this companies gross incompetence. cmcdar I now have answered your question but you didn't answer mine: Do you pack or check you wheel bearings on your TV every year? Also, do you do your own work or do you rely on others for that? Man, when this thread started out, I felt it was borderline trolling, now I'm sure it's full blown trolling. T&P, I'm really not sure why you're so concerned when people maintain their trailer bearings. If you feel they're wasting their time, what do you care? Does this create a disturbance in the force that somehow effects you? But, to answer some of your questions from my perspective: No, I don't pack the bearings in my tv. In fact, I've not had a vehicle with pack able bearings in any of my cars since the 70's. They've all been either FWD or 4WD. I believe most of the vehicles with packable bearings are RWD 2WD. I could be wrong, so don't slam me, just my observation based on the vehicles I've owned. Yes, I do pack the bearings on my trailer every year. I guess that disturbs you, but oh well. Maybe I'll bring my IR with me the next time I travel and really get your head spinning! You're wrong regarding the lateral forces on bearings on a TANDEM trailer v a car or truck. If you've ever seen a trailer making a tight turn, one tire is scrubbing one way, the other is scrubbing the other way. This, by the way, is one argument for having ST tires on a trailer with tandem axles. The STs don't provide the same traction as a LT tire, allowing it to slide sideways better, putting less strain in the bearings, axles, etc. Hate to break this to you, but what you're doing is not a proper bearing inspection. Do you even remove the inner bearing? How do you possible inspect the bearing without cleaning it off? Your posts are inconsistent. In an earlier post you stated you've packed the bearings maybe three times on a 29 yo trailer. Then you say you don't pack them every 7-10 years, you just do is magical inspection. Which is it? While I agree my annual cleaning, inspection and packing may be a little over the top, it hardly takes any time, is very inexpensive for me to do, and I'm practically guaranteed a trouble free camping season. I'm certainly not harming my trailer by performing this maintenance. So my question to you is, why do you care how others maintain their campers? The only reason I'd care would be if I was buying a trailer used. All other things equal, I'd go with the one maintained every year over one that gets this magical inspection every 7-10. Can we start a new thread entitled "why do people who ignore basic maintenance get upset when others don't?"
jfkmk 07/28/15 06:37pm Travel Trailers
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 4  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2016 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS