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 > Your search for 'pack bearings wheel' found 67 matches.

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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Electric brake drums - how to correct out of balance

Holee Molee. Something so simple. Remove drum, pop the bearings out, clean bearings, races and EVERYTHING shiny clean. No seals! Reassemble. Loosely. LOOSELY! If the drum turns out of balance, use MAG WHEEL WEIGHTS, but epoxy them or JB Weld them to the drum until the drum is reasonably balanced. Pop the drums off again. Pack the bearings, pound in the seals, and reassemble. Yeah, you can go further and mount the tire to the lubeless drum bearings, and balance the tire that way too. It isn't spin balancing, but I can tell you it works just fine for low speed trailers.
MEXICOWANDERER 04/12/14 03:44pm Tech Issues
RE: Dexter EZ Lub - no 'return'

This is what makes me nervous and question the wisdom of using these. Dexter even says to remove and inspect the bearings and repack once a year (or 12K miles) so why bother with the EZ-lube. I don't buy the lawyer argument someone stated the other day for why Dexter says this. The bearings are made in Ch*na and just aren't up to the quality level they should be and I think they should be inspected regularly and I think, even replaced with good quality ones. IMO it's simply better to inspect the brakes and bearings and repack annually and for the $200 or so, it's easiest to just get a shop to do it. Our dealer says they pack the bearings as part of the PDI. I use my EZ lubes sparingly and as directed. With that said I repacked my wheel bearings this week and found one of the wheels had grease pushed passed the seal. Not onto the brakes yet but very close. I will not be using the EZ lubes any longer.
myredracer 04/12/14 09:27am Tech Issues
RE: Electric brake drums - how to correct out of balance

I've been harping on this subject for a long time. The drums are NOT balanced from the factory and there is little point in balancing wheels under this condition. Buying new drums is a crapshoot because they may be even worse than the ones you are replacing. The OP is the first person that has come on here having actually tested the balance of the drums. OP, you are correct that there is no provision for balancing. What I do is clean out ALL the grease from the bearings, add a few drops of light oil, and find the heavy spot. Then mount the tire/wheel with the heavy spot opposite the drum heavy spot. Mark everything and add balance weights to the wheel till it comes into balance. Clean the bearings, pack grease and reassemble with a new grease seal. Using this procedure, you should be able to get the entire assemblies within 1/2 oz. If you just balance the tire, you could be out 6 oz. or more.
Lynnmor 04/11/14 07:22am Tech Issues
RE: 2014 Wildwood X-Lite FS 235BH question/opinion

As long as you maintain it you will get a lot of years service even out of a entry level camper. Follow the recomended service such as check the sealent on the roof, pack the wheel bearings ect. I own a 2005 Wildwood LE 26 BHSS.
colliehauler 04/05/14 07:13pm Travel Trailers
RE: HELP! First Time buyer getting cold feet.

My 2 towing concerns are when it comes to 1) the higher profile (11 ft) than I am accustomed to and 2) any kind of "mountain" travel, so any advise or comments on those concerns would be appreciated. I Don't think the height will be an issue. My fiver height is 12'10" and I have not had an issue. You do need to know your height and be aware of your surroundings, but I try to stay on main drags and have never had to turn around due to height. Just be aware and read signs (in particular when going under covers at gas stations, etc). Be patient in the mountains. Stay in lower gears if needed not only for going up the mountains, but in order to use the brakes less when descending. As far as being away from the homestead, I guess I am concerned that we might be a couple years too early with this venture and should wait until our daughter goes off to college in a couple of years. Leaving the kids at home is not too big of a deal since, as a couple of you have already mentioned, the 22 year old is very capable of keeping watch over everything. I can't really help you there since I don't know the kids involved. Trust your instincts here. Start with short trips and go from there. You will be able to tell how long is too long. If we were to move ahead with this purchase (which would be within the next few days) I DO NOT look forward to dealing with the whole "black water" procedures, as well as the other set-up and tear-down procedures (so any comments are on that are welcome), although I am experienced with the actual "hooking-up" to the truck/trailer thing, as mentioned above and that is not a concern. As many have stated, the black water procedures are not that bad. Keep a pack of disposable gloves nearby. We do as one person above stated. I handle the outside set up and wife does the inside stuff. We are now completely set up within about 10 minutes max. It will take you about 30 minutes or more the first few times, then it will become second nature and not a big deal. One final, specific question: For any of you who own or have looked into the Keystone Copper Canyon from the 2009 vintage, we would be very interested in your comments about this particular make, model, etc., as well as any specific common problems to check-out prior to possible purchase. I wen tin a Copper Canyon lookinf a few years ago and it was nice. I don't really know much about them, but I would approach it just like any other used fiver. Do the slides would properly and are the slides seals in good condition? Do all the appliances work? Get on the roof and look over it well. Do you see any tears and is the caulking in good shape? Water is the single biggest enemy of any RV. Does the fifth wheel smell moldy? Are there any soft spots in the floor? are there any wavy walls? Look under the RV. Are the tires and axles in good condition? Ask the owner any questions you may have, but be sure to ask this one "Has the fifth wheel ever leaked or have you ever had any water damage? Have you ever had any problems with the brakes, bearings or axles? This is actually a good time to explore the RV lifestyle. You can take short trips and see how it goes. If you love it, you will know it by the time you are fully retired and can then consider upgrading. If you do not like it, you will know to look elsewhere for fun when retiring. You are doing it right and minimizing your expense be starting used. You will never know whether or not it is something you love until you try it. As suggested above, you can rent, but this can get expensive quick since many Class C's around here rent for about $300 a day. I hope this has helped. Good luck in whatever you decide.
kzspree320 03/21/14 01:39pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Greasing bearings, other

Packing the center of the hub is a waste of grease and time. If the hub gets hot enough for the grease packed into the center to flow out into the bearings, something is terribly wrong. A properly packed wheel bearing will last at least 30,000 miles in normal operating conditions. Think back in the old days when we used to pack wheel bearings on our cars and trucks, the service interval was 30,000-50,000 miles
eHoefler 03/17/14 05:45am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Lance 1025 on 3/4 ton diesel Silverado

The payload is determined by the tires. Put two Nitto or Toyo tires rated at 3750@80 PSI and you have 7500 - 3000 (weight of your truck on the rear tires) or 4500 lbs. of load capacity in terms of the axle, wheel bearings, and tires. If the camper weigh causes the truck to sag in the rear then for $500 you can add a set of SuperSprings that will take an hour to bolt in place. No different than the 3500 that has a second leaf pack on each side. With a 4500 lb. maximum payload you can stay at 4,000 lbs. maximum with gear, food, water, etc. and go with a camper that has a true dry weight of 3,000 lbs. and there are many to choose from. 1000 lbs. may seem like a lot to allow for "extras" but the Lance weight does not include an AC, a second battery, a roof rack, generator, solar panels, or the weight of the fresh, gray, and black water tank fluids at about 8 lbs. per gallon. Add a generator and fuel or tow a trailer and add a heavier duty hitch and a stinger and it is easy to push the boundaries. The other $3500 option is to get Rickman 19.5 rims and 19.5 tires at which point you have a rear load capacity of 8800 lbs. minus the weight of the truck. Not cheap but a better option in many ways than DRW.
wintersun 03/16/14 06:59pm Truck Campers
RE: axle, hub, bearing question

It does not take much grease in the bearing to do the job if the bearing is packed properly. It's the bearing that needs the grease not the whole inside of the hub. Boat trailers use bearing buddy's to keep pressure in the hub so as you back your boat trailer in and the hub cools quickly it creates a vacuum and can suck water in. I have packed wheel bearings for many years on cars and trailers and only a minimal amount of good quality of grease is needed. If you get the hub hot enough to get extra grease to flow into your bearing you have other problems. Just pack the bearing not the hub and service at recommended intervals.
Montana Mike 03/11/14 08:27pm Travel Trailers
Bearing Grease Intervals

On our 27-5L Fox fifth wheel, I do my own bearing packing. I use top quality synthetic grease and thoroughly clean and pack bearings every two years. That adds up to once every 6000 miles. Rig is stored under covert every winter. I am beginning to think that I am into overkill. Perhaps it's because I am getting older and wrestling the heavy tires and drums is tougher than it once was — or am I just getting wiser and less compulsive. Opinions and educated insights would be appreciated. BTW, everything I've done a repacking, grease and everything looks just fine. Wondering.
enahs 03/05/14 08:22pm Tech Issues
RE: Weight causing tires to rub inside of trailer

My tires are very close to the I-beam frame and a single tire does rub the frame if the other tire on that side goes flat (or comes off). I am considering either 2 inch longer axles or new wheels that are offset to the outside one inch more. Hi, Just passing along a concern about changing wheels, trailer wheels traditionally have zero offset. The bearings in the brake drum are sized to wheel loads on zero offset. If you shift the wheel weight 1" by 1" offset wheel this "might" aggravate bearing issues from and overhung load. If you are on Dexter axles, call them and ask. They have real good customer service. Ask if you can use 1" offset wheels on your size axle. Then you will know for sure. BTW, changing axle tubes cost is not that bad. My 6,000# axle tubes did not cost that much. IIRC right they where like $125 ish each delivered to my house. With your big toy hauler I do not know if you are on 6,000# or 7,000# axles. Good luck. John Yes you are correct about the axle flip. One does not want to "flip" the axle. Just move the spring pack to the top of bottom,(over /under) leave the axle the same way. Camber is bent into the axle tube and is positive camber (arch pointing up) If the arch is pointing down that is bad... Negative camber. You can also mess up the toe angle flipping the axle upside down. If you have slight "toe in" a good thing, this will turn into "toe out" with the axle upside down. Between the camber being wrong and toe aggravated, wearing tires will soon come.
JBarca 02/25/14 08:35pm Towing
RE: Wheel bearing re packed , price?

How often do you get them packed. 50 years ago they used to recommend every 10,000 miles on a car. Now on my pick up it is 60,000 miles or 5 years. I have seen bearings go over 100,000 miles on a pack. I feel it is an over kill to do then so often, and just a way to make money. Yes, to do a good pack job it takes about 30 minutes per wheel, so $200 would be considered a fair price. I do my own trailer every 12K to 15K, mostly to inspect brakes, or about 3 or 4 years.
Dr Quick 02/25/14 06:58pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: E-Z lube axles

I used them on a 5ver -once. Never again. Called Dexter about this, they said they wish RV manufacturers would not use them. They are intended for use only on trailers that get the axles submerged in water, such as a boat trailer. I replaced the seal I blew out using the hand-pump-and-spin method, and hand-packed them after that experience. This is exactly right. They are great on boat trailers that get submerged in water. Unless the seals are new, you spin the wheel as you slowly add grease and nothing else goes wrong........they work on Campers. However most people feel that hand packing is very sufficient. How often do you pack the bearings on your tow vehicle??? Same principle as campers. They don't need constant greasing!!! Did you see my picture of the bad bearing? I never had that happen in a car either. I'm sorry, but this is not car quality items we are dealing with. JMHO
Learjet 02/24/14 07:11am Tech Issues
RE: E-Z lube axles

I used them on a 5ver -once. Never again. Called Dexter about this, they said they wish RV manufacturers would not use them. They are intended for use only on trailers that get the axles submerged in water, such as a boat trailer. I replaced the seal I blew out using the hand-pump-and-spin method, and hand-packed them after that experience. This is exactly right. They are great on boat trailers that get submerged in water. Unless the seals are new, you spin the wheel as you slowly add grease and nothing else goes wrong........they work on Campers. However most people feel that hand packing is very sufficient. How often do you pack the bearings on your tow vehicle??? Same principle as campers. They don't need constant greasing!!!
Likes to tow 02/23/14 06:18pm Tech Issues
RE: E-Z lube axles

my 5er is a 2006. For about the first 6 years, I averaged around 5,000 miles per year. Like many, I thought the zerks were the best thing since sliced bread. I read all of the do's and don'ts. I lubed mine the safe way, wheels off the ground, rotate them slowly and pump grease very slowly. Then, one day, after about 3-4 years of using the zerks, I pulled all of the wheels off to inspect them and found one seal blown. What a mess! Everything in the wheel was covered with grease. Since then, I started doing them by hand. I bought a bearing packer which speeds up packing the bearings. All in all, since I have owned the 5er, I have replaced all of the brakes two times, the wheel bearings once, and the drums once. I think my 5er has around 35,000 miles on it and a lot of these miles were in the Rocky Mountains. If you decide to use the zerks here is my two cents on how to do it. 1. Get the wheels off of the ground. 2. Use a good grease recommended by your axle manufacturer. 3. Pump very slow, 1 or 2 pumps while rotating the wheel. 4. The first time you do this, be prepared for a long time to do this and a lot of grease to fill up the void in the drum. 5. After filling, make sure to leave some expansion space around the lock nut before putting the cap back on. 6. Pull the wheels off once a year to inspect. If you do all of this, you may find that it is just as easy to forget the zerks and pack them by hand. One blown seal changed my mind.
Like2Travel 02/23/14 06:06pm Tech Issues
RE: Newbie needs help with TT

You don't give a lot of information so it's hard to be specific to your case, but: 1) not only total weight, but hitch weight, especially if you have a load in the tow vehicle. 2) Size of propane tanks - some have 1 small tanks and others 2 larger tanks 3) Freshwater, grey water and black water tank sizes. If you will be in some state or natl parks without full hookups, larger holding tanks are nice. 4) Cargo carrying capacity - some lighter trailers have very little carrying capacity and you may pack fairly heavy 5) Look at the axles and wheel bearing ease of service. I like being able to just attach a zerk and add grease to my bearings. All axles are not created equal. 6) Look inside the cabinets and storage compartments to see the construction quality beneath the surface. See how it's built. Do you want stick and tin construction (nothing wrong with it, just preferance), or aluminum studs, fiberglass exterior and laminated construction (my preference, but you do run a small risk of delamination, especially if you are not diligent about checking caulking). Look at the construction using the brochure illustrations. 7) Size of refrigerator and hot water heater - normally bigger is better for us 8) Amenities, number, type and quality 9) THE MOST IMPORTANT - the floorplan. Think about the trailer and how you will be using it. Look at the flow. Which floorplan fits what you do best? This is the single most important thing. 10) In general, first time buyers buy too small and end up wanting more space. Good luck. Whet he said
OpenRangePullen_Ford 02/07/14 02:19pm Travel Trailers
RE: Newbie needs help with TT

You don't give a lot of information so it's hard to be specific to your case, but: 1) not only total weight, but hitch weight, especially if you have a load in the tow vehicle. 2) Size of propane tanks - some have 1 small tanks and others 2 larger tanks 3) Freshwater, grey water and black water tank sizes. If you will be in some state or natl parks without full hookups, larger holding tanks are nice. 4) Cargo carrying capacity - some lighter trailers have very little carrying capacity and you may pack fairly heavy 5) Look at the axles and wheel bearing ease of service. I like being able to just attach a zerk and add grease to my bearings. All axles are not created equal. 6) Look inside the cabinets and storage compartments to see the construction quality beneath the surface. See how it's built. Do you want stick and tin construction (nothing wrong with it, just preferance), or aluminum studs, fiberglass exterior and laminated construction (my preference, but you do run a small risk of delamination, especially if you are not diligent about checking caulking). Look at the construction using the brochure illustrations. 7) Size of refrigerator and hot water heater - normally bigger is better for us 8) Amenities, number, type and quality 9) THE MOST IMPORTANT - the floorplan. Think about the trailer and how you will be using it. Look at the flow. Which floorplan fits what you do best? This is the single most important thing. 10) In general, first time buyers buy too small and end up wanting more space. Good luck.
kzspree320 02/07/14 01:58pm Travel Trailers
RE: Dodge Ram payload vs Ford

Per Ford: "Gross Axle Weight Rating is determined by the minimum component of the axle system (axles, computer-selected springs, wheels, tires) of a specific vehicle. Front and rear GAWR's wiill, in all cases, sum to a number equal to or greater than the GVWR for the particular vehicle. Maximum loaded vehicle (including passengers, equipment and payload) cannot exceed the GVW rating or GAWR (front or rear)." The AAM axles and wheel bearings are the same for the GM and Ram trucks and rated at 10,900 lbs. so the payload reduction is based primarily on the rims and tires provided at the factory. All the manufacturers also subtract 150 lbs. per passenger seat from the payload rating which is why you will find that the trucks with a regular cab have the highest load rating. I bought a 2500 as I wanted SRW and the GM extended cab and that was not available in a 3500 model. Also most of the 3500 trucks on the dealers' lots were 2WD and DRW and I wanted 4WD and SRW. I spent $450 to add Supersprings and turn my 2500 Duramax into a 3500 Duramax equivalent. The ONLY difference between the 3500 and 2500 Duramax was the extra leaf pack on the 1-ton and the availability of DRW. For a camper my first choice would be a GM or Ram truck to get the much stiffer frames these two manufacturers provide. GM upgraded its truck frames in 2011 for both 2500 and 3500 and Ram is doing the same as of 2014 (in 2013 only the 1-ton Ram trucks got the upgraded frame). With DRW the frame flexing is even more of a problem and I would not choose Ford but pick between the other two.
Redsky 01/23/14 05:34pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Lets talk about Bearing Buddies

I for one was not aware till I read the PDF that one is supposed to rotate the wheel as the grease is changed. Perhaps others with poor experiences were unaware of this requirement . I mentioned earlier about following instructions for using E-Z lube. I think some owners don't receive the info, and don't search for it. There is much misunderstanding,such as over greasing, blown seals, etc. The old grease is pushed out the front, it comes out right around your grease gun tip, as you pump. If you over grease, the new will flow out the front. This is why it is most important to use the double lip, spring tentioned seals, specified for the E-Z lube system. I also use the recommended grease, and use the same each time. I agree the hand pack is best, when done by someone that knows what they are doing. The RV shop likely won't have their top tech greasing bearings. I know there are many qualified people on this forum, and some not so much. I would have to wonder, if 10 average joes, packed their own bearings/replaced seals, how many would have done it correctly? Upon reassembly, did they all torque the nut just right, before backing off, and finger tight? Did they all replace the seals, with no damage, and used the right ones? Just sayin, whatever the method, if things aren't done properly, problems will arise. Correct use of the E-Z lube system is better than not greasing at all, and I think the reason for many trailers having them on from the factory. Happy New Year to all, Jerry Francesca Knowles......... and there you have it (quoted above)..;) ~
ol Bombero-JC 01/22/14 01:31am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Jack size for tire change

The 2 ton jack will be enough. A 2ton jack should work BUT it is going to take a lot of man power effort. A 4ton jack will take considerably LESS manpower effort but will take more "pumps". A 10 ton jack will be nearly effortless but will require considerably more "pumps" I typically use a 2 1/2 ton floor jack while at home for checking the wheel bearings and let me tell you... even with the LONG handle it really takes a LOT of effort. My recommendation is go with the highest jack rating possible to reduce your effort. However you need to check the minimum and maximum height of the jack. Too tall and it will not fit under your trailer with a flat. Not enough height and you run out of jack before you can get a new inflated tire on the hub. Bigger jacks also have something else going for them, stability. They tend to have a bigger base and makes them much more stable and less tippy. This can be an issue while out on the road, you often will only have the side of the road to work with which is almost never flat. Make sure you pack some pieces of wood to use as cribbing, a 2x10 cut at say 10" length can give your jack a "platform" to sit on which is not going to sink into soft ground. A few short pieces of 4x4s can be helpful. Never get under the trailer with only a jack, use some wood blocking under the frame or a couple of adjustable car stands under the frame. Safety first...
Gdetrailer 01/11/14 04:02pm Travel Trailers
RE: Long Bed 1 ton SRW with dual slider?

Rear axle and wheel bearings can handle the weight and going to 19.5 tires will provide a rear load capacity of 8800 lbs. minus the weight of the truck itself. SuperSprings can help the stock leaf pack and that should be all you need with most trucks sold today. A rear anti-sway bar might help or it might be unnecessary, and best to wait until you have a chance to try out the truck with the camper in the bed. The 19.5 tires are going have stiffer sidewalls and help with handling as well as load capacity. Often people take the overkill route or make flawed assumptions, like that a F-450 has a great payload rating than an F-350. The F-450 has a higher tow rating but that is very different than the payload rating. For that you need to go to a F-550 which makes even less sense for the camper load planned.
Redsky 01/03/14 08:37pm Truck Campers
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