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  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Pack bearings - by hAND or by tool?

pack by hand and yes keep same bearings on each wheel. us retired folks gotta have some thing to keep us busy.
midnightsadie 04/24/18 12:03pm Tech Issues
RE: Pack bearings - by hAND or by tool?

Pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat (five minutes) versus Goosh (5-seconds) Here is a little ditty that isn't opinion but fact Grease used-to-be a lot different. Bright oil mixed into a Hectorite Clay Base. Pack the bearings like normal Then gob a glob of grease into the center area of the hub between the two bearings. As the oil was used up within the bearing cage new oil osmosis'ed it's way through all the globbed grease and flowed it's way into the bearing. They used to brag the grease was long stranded or long fibered. But given a lot of time what was left was almost dried clay. Modern grease does not act like that at all. So any grease outside of the bearing cage is a waste. The modern "grease" ads brag about the grease "staying put" No joke. Grease outside the bearing cage is a waste. I dealt with the hectorite clay based grease with the arrival of the first Delco alternators. These early alternators had unique bearing sealing shields that retained a reservoir of grease. Bearing lube life was phenomenal. My bus has the same front wheel bearing lube as big-rigs. Stemco oil filled chambers. I got a bright idea and substituted turbine oil instead of what they recommended. Seems to work good.
MEXICOWANDERER 04/24/18 11:53am Tech Issues
RE: Pack bearings - by hAND or by tool?

Pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat pat (five minutes) versus Goosh (5-seconds) Here is a little ditty that isn't opinion but fact Grease used-to-be a lot different. Bright oil mixed into a Hectorite Clay Base. Pack the bearings like normal Then gob a glob of grease into the center area of the hub between the two bearings. As the oil was used up within the bearing cage new oil osmosis'ed it's way through all the globbed grease and flowed it's way into the nearing. They used to brag the grease was long stranded or long fibered. But given a lot of time what was left was almost dried clay. Modern grease does not act like that at all. So any grease outside of the bearing cage is a waste. The modern "grease" ads brag about the grease "staying put" No joke. Grease outside the bearing cage is a waste. I dealt with the hectorite clay based grease with the arrival of the first Delco alternators. These early alternators had unique bearing sealing shields that retained a reservoir of grease. Bearing lube life was phenomenal. My bus has the same front wheel bearing lube as big-rigs. Stemco oil filled chambers. I got a bright idea and substituted turbine oil instead of what they recommended. Seems to work good.
MEXICOWANDERER 04/24/18 11:52am Tech Issues
RE: WInnebago roof

Serious question, on the part below, who requires more maintenance? We've owned 5 motorhomes (including an earlier Itasca) and a TT and I honestly don't know. I've had RVs for 40 years and maintainting a bead of caulk on a roofline is light work compared to what some require.I answered that in the same paragraph Bruce. Somehow I'm missing it? My question is what builder and/or roof system requires more checks and/or maintenance? We've owned 5 motorhomes and a travel trailer and none of them had this type of required maintenance schedule. I will admit washing a true EPDM rubber roof is a pain, but in the 5 years we owned that one I let nature wash it.Bruce, our 5th wheel was what I used as a comparison. This is directly out of the manual:Inspect the roof every 90 days, paying particular attention to the seams where the areas of sheet metal, moldings, rubber and/or fiberglass are joined. Carefully inspect the sealant around any vents, skylights, air conditioners, etc.Every six months inspect all seals, including windows. Now add to that:Rotate tires every 5,000 milesRepack wheel bearings every 6,000 miles or 6 months,If trailer has not moved for 2 months, repack wheel bearings before useAdjust brakes every 3,000 miles Keep in mind, with the fancy 2+5 year warranty, these were Required maintenance items that had to be documented by yourself or through a Dealer to stay in warranty, and failure to produce the documents was used as a hammer to deny warranty in many many cases. I take all recommended maintenance with a grain of salt, but for those that care to get anal about the requirements, I would much rather get on my roof every six months to check that seam than try to keep up with the 5th wheel requirements of every 3 months knowing every other time I have to also rotate tires, pack bearings, and adjust brakes. http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL1523/6528899/12657597/413864858.jpg
Mile High 04/24/18 08:46am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Packing ez lube bearings

Its good to have a forum like this as after trying to get a proper answer from both Dexter and Lippert, it actually came from a discussion with my local auto parts store guy. So I thought after doing the service then a long ride, that I would share that information with everyone. I hope others searching the forum will now have some factual simple guidance. Happy Trails..All I read on here are more opinions by people that like EZ Lube and people who hate them. Just depends on who you wish to listen to. Plus some of the opinions are by people who have never used EZ Lube, never been around them, and have no real knowledge of them. Just regurgitating forum lore. And your speculative and FACTLESS post is a prime example of this what you call opinions and forum folk lore. I did what I considered a "FACT BASED" post back in 2009 which I tried to include a link to but somehow those links are not valid now??? Below is that post with updated links to the pics that were in the original post and are now no longer valid. ******EDIT***** I was able to link to that original post and it's in the CLICKY below for those interested (the pics are not there tho) CLICKY I'm in the process of doing my first full tear down/inspection on my Dexter E-Z Lube axles and took some pics. This is a pic of the axle spindle upon removal of the drum and you can see that there was zero grease in the area around the axle spindle between the inner and outer bearing. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/0WNFs0mMm4YD53wxQvO5kFHuGh8v6Fz4H0pQSBkGHIzUGRNN7Zr4YXa0mB6p5MrHctEAGsXazLjEw8_qnSjhPDdXRoTcw6UymZHp7kZhgJ5JuJ4GjvqShmiiuu0oJ3s1icINx98JPDfFl4gL3Wd4w8vL56d56Lm6N-3U40WQH09PpZkvJdfPc3R8H8DchRKQzT305FGZ0p0641QtcYM6dCc7FHeHL0fiCSmpAx5C5QW4TyUAzUuGEclLY3zJf-hwnqpFvxz9x6kznefhFUKdWMB8Kp4n6Gj4-nz-hgM_q9JUdMvtiuDDQHkGcqe87PK6aBMFu-mx_X-BboF2saK8DUPLipmTtSMS633mAz0ooi1tsEKQhUBDY-3ivEwfSmTrkAbp0Q_l41elm_7gZSY4NyWoIR0F0jAlUIy9up54KDMivcxiM67-tieO2DwaAaPcwRY8iRg23rCGjcvcuRZgUMM15tH5nyIn8YaZL4YF6TDQCXeXCOEsqS2UckbSjpA5q7lff1Mufy74qBgEM17H90__bpQUW3G8x9okvdJsoH0teokWSNz8r-H3t7sR-QhZS6fOD5mKijkwpRzMNwctvvTuAsdjrhGctkCOkpRjqZTbIPgesJ9QHnxIw4aACxYI4UkLAhSnMSpGXEJS4Hh_UU4KJmbyQogK=w378-h282-no Here is where the grease exits which is on the inner face of where the grease seal fits and exits at only one small hole. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/U5JdUUB4C_t248uK5nwKQKeaFI62uYzeUEu48bIdnvnFvRj-3VBkOK7ISbrf8hikAGwQj_0mPpj3llxFEd0BlPdz_BuVVMToaRVwvXP1eMYWkVbycvtIrbMOlRahHzQmLyif3cWfuIW6nr24Tnju-ZqG1jzCC601y9nlfYW6RQk8XDMEfURwJQK1sbayCaWt2bFctAOFSsfMIECKUinTK2pLMLmncUZ8wp4lLyILf3Jft8F-cyAIniK1qLlrfESxJhS6U-N8G0zdJiUpytV7GiRdS9Su86-e_7At3QATIZ6eLlVQixU6Vn9wKFYwALU6jnUJ0uvY_0iCWcLDTilaFx6OolzQJjAIAUFvA4aHnoamayykGGHUEYFkjXFkWpIzXcn9fN1DTx_PwU12AcFiXAJYtPS2NohImno519v4yayUCdS-sWFKGdOs-U86wsrka8N65LP9xAbnKvNEyxDTEDvAM6c-wA5-04DThuYHYgsfkEEqo_oVq3n_7qGXLm3LtKqpr5fSxLmVQ78VWb9Wsb6oRiPIU8LuJ05VWHRH9zarzq-FdRoK3kNn-67HQreNxXifHJaLF1MuqELKueDRGbIcJml1boxUl6XUVuSuqrGUIpYSA6Po5NNA_tCk4tFw8zpBFE2WbyJ465qIrlF9wqiMWK-yAMVg=w684-h504-no and a pic of the new grease coming out https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/mNgZIsaQ_ViUhrmsaPJkyqIKvgQRSLmScaj-J5C5TB_6cLMekFEnyoyrCaUNxmylIqDFldpSlyTA7pKHCPX9xJgXDO_R8SWEiGUfW2HoXkdA-uISmiAoEPEvth9IaKAqqkaR8hA09cSr0LwNm6s_53ytuiEiYitmGfnjdQY13NiQGInw9nJmu3VoOlyD6C1Z1OBvtU53IaDD16TdvuwiQhl6ol9mI78_wKOuvnQuxQ2VvVI0SYSab-eWs-vEexASRWcZbfRdJ_pQiPgkRKAcXS63tBGp92w9z-SjYd4VrAGUK3WYgVUgRz8uvhaycaamHQzzDl4_8ATIvY4BXLk2vPualRckERSvj0e_ZTpUQJnw9ForzLl8YI3QYmT9dNwubL7G2yvSoj68ZfAPkS76_H-3IYQMbua4Hif4x8lhlZOVn_jt2hLVx9a-7ddRXQfhPhmViTJNMw198B6ArJgz8G0d8KZSvzMuioq1VPGe0KMj2RpOEdIiUkUOhJH9qdW4x5rROwIxxko6xJf_fRdvnZuHBf4g32FrmqFFZVLAZmXUVQp_S49HW6P05Syas-BXpYbcELUIPdJNV3rfFQwgdBy73yvcW5UoQCx7gDoC2rcwHHzptzBZCfihU4e31zSoV38Q8srWIQerlUEG58TF4pkP8_EGS67s=w716-h504-no Here is how much grease was on the inner bearing and grease seal and notice even the cavity in the grease seal wasn't full. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/2Es8JcaXqPJCSsUBlPG_DCD9mmpF_yx4l-43nVL3TPTd1q1s7e4mx-7Kl0IkEm2n-kEgePti1vKgXGeHEl_kD-SeYl-sSEy7AEB3MWpDAkvX7Ce0dJv9H9ywQ-svU91LcSNdlrJ63wU9eOWHxiu4XSm1BTlQzUvBtKITjvjAdc_DLIYwTaleb36OH60EJzwjUXjNGUH9JKVjGzn81M5rZM4xHi251GfjrwaKrQFmu7aLpPdM8MoUZdqljCe8bihgW__-Knmxz99zDXNH34rw2TeX4CRx4XvIkgF7xN9xQgdpeuMEAEyKMNVRUHNpqdNA4eJsu7jbiCYGuHChRKrW74raEvrl951jDgun7rcCxpMXku3y69UYfTX7mafpxq-2fI40SeBRKgq13n8x84fVDHg8oey7YiP62CugYUU0Qp0JvWr_BOhZcRbGEi7gPmNMaYvne20boucIXd7uhBi88XyILunk3GhdbundSKrCB7humd40DBRuSQ8xBc6X_e9I8yW5kXjaPlCUp_8F2EkJ4rMObeM38HGJ7oniWvB1NTM63P4b_GRXTa9ou-swjnlEMoqCZtEKx8Iyu4uSP9QyrACHeYFP6rMHVeuPMQrx-BDpcaFq3CQMV83-iQGFZCmIQkoz-BZE6SlTCctceUGNQ0v1b2Pgm9dV=w708-h504-no https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/cwkiZ9k5x4LXs-2NP_xa8UNbL2u4TBDw3HY-fql855aAsUotPSk16l1S6wUVsFh2BBIAhv3had_u7V576FMfyPEsvUdSg2wjGzSV19pKG0aLeexgk41aO2kgwiWnQDUbU2GDoUQLL3gMQbEnXQ269oORGhYDaDXQ_gBsuyH6b8wVz2jMgJxSlK_zmvZKvhxOYu7i5t2_43tDolcf0T4sYdbIkA7b9WXuHzKDJ2_GPM5iy4d0dnS_Ud6mwtFSIEuaMVESiJovacQ_vteIsWSCqwt3lbT6FEzEc_vG9R0b6KjFCdSacnWbepibXo1pdvw6PrNahLUjsJy5zzXPcgPla5097fyLggzKErx75oAJF1wphDVcB_VUqTm8xmOvpYnSshYTdXGSLi-huQ9IdaXCRf-EhZ8NDzwqcVfKz4OdJCNNkdPyBcHEXqBCmFpOhw0SqkGznY9DK179YV95zbRbheuDo9GwVA3gLXg9ZdZpM4GdWQnsmDILQVCRl02v3MfuiK9PQO0QkBQ3IqqcL1W1jP5cC2nubBgR2ojqnW9uuHmpKPo_MMD3SbBPHcgwJxs9ZMauQxpcQ-WbO88uPhVh0CmNfnYeRZ182pZJYKlUq84kRZfTsHo0atHnUYCSWNP9521NayEgVW-00U6LokVhoq8NDcvNqISh=w660-h504-no https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/nFDAOu_jwS2w8bbWG9zAKv7HjJCpP8kjNe80n-FPg5kt2uQCCnV6BKx3QbgaIJ-_8uxBQsIE-F8cyqZKDq33eo-9nfcMknZmFyW6F80LqYH6TKPAfBH8cDwxtI6naHek0ZcbL5-EPiZ0swuqbG0SKalN04OrVzXfqL-Zcs_TeZUipLBWIRarbTP_vamo9ThubtbWcgRpqE6B4w1CABvhhry5oEoUyVcuFJEq1gijT3eU3ZwJSz9fQGvColCRvtgYuYhXgNPu9tWzie1wbjcbh8qpIABTcz2e1B27ZIDAIo-LvuVYTsBfE6kppbN9vf1UN77eJNyhOSZLOole3Ujt0TfErMe6cmr_hqCb5QB77CAFdSahR98xqxXDd3_m7vpsUhzxFbJQw0y_HGLH0l9LXKIID1N2XdrZRnLCEY8r9WYXF_07wAoWdcBsxaysMR3ng4qDZ2Cj8O7r7RPSgqs7igOsyf84ucb4HJGjZM-SU6i68_JmEpDTiSDkVyKVNtAK13nCRnIVA7cc9aspPYuaD2fE5Joo3zBUIHFGmy-xEgawMlVBoF7sCZ7b7RYxuV-Qp5Nn8WOGsH3nEawPfjGHMRGKLucU6fPQiijkAuzXSJWQbMKLmaNDJcsIB6Qblyxf3DQiQum6Lg1FYEXCwwgNBTup-mGGedpe=w632-h504-no I've read several comments on this one or two pumps is all you need so I took and cleaned both the bearing and grease seal and reinstalled them dry and then applied two good pumps to the grease fitting on the end of the axle and below is how much grease got applied and I did not rotate the wheel either during or after pumping the new grease in. https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-BFZJ5dwPpUUw1YwZsKXfrtg59fWdK2gnfyT7VpPzbztBrmSsp561jed2n2QwgvZbFZVXU_hRuZbwc68J7hZZnu1jbeCiEIwWdnAhqveUMAeX7f488yz6XrohwvQ1XZqLQB16yATJTB32KG5I3-U7AWkov1A7akiamKNfX2wsVlYCcnbyzsFhSdTR1Lj9cL8NTLgL3ROSjmUIaDiA9TzqoKMcA-E7xYsjDkTmrNF4LzonHcqHlhU-7PfOz7gHrE0MyVSIGMVHBjsy88VxsW0Oft_keEoBpeRbL0R5mGaDqFuhRI41aEAwn8_uFOmcNnOKCuDkAsLhZjQ9_VkrkXpCJ5-CQOmAKDg0yWx9KgxMdaagOidsIVC8Vb_L8wXP1pO8E0r-YQN-PakwOw6G2pgBFLt65mRYufYTDunHkxZUHQR1El-Ci_TtpWyvvBzl5l6238JobWDM88FrXSfhi9gdTf4mRLRTDmkAhQZm6HWwhniryGMdtZsvIZENYkA0GptIlbG72bdMT0nzm0ub1kBBQt-eksok4n7itZ0zhmJARNmR9l0HL-vpblhTcYgWWl7Sdm_j-yT4a1FQfUeIRk7Wng8A0Ni_p21ePMP24V2FK5OQHR68Nc-3MsP-dLVEx5sbF6QJzEvi_tzK0foHjpcSdmUMX-TG1nT=w650-h504-no Also be aware that until you fill the cavity in the hub/axle between the inner and outer bearings no grease will be applied to the outer bearing until you pump enough grease in to fill that cavity. I gave up after about 20 pumps and took the outer bearing out and squirted grease directly into the cavity and this was after I had filled the new grease seal up with grease in it's cavity also. At least with the Dexter E-Z Lube axles there is absolutely no way to use the "number of pumps" to lubricate both bearings. You have to keep pumping while rotating the tire until the cavity if full and you seal grease being expelled from around the outer bearing and axle spindle nut. While the E-Z Lube concept is good and does work after doing two wheels I'm somewhat concerned about just the amount of grease it takes to get it where it's working as designed. I'm estimating almost 1/3 or more of a standard tube of grease to fill things up on just one wheel. At $6/tube that might approach $9 in grease. I'm still formulating what I consider a reasonable maintenance schedule, but am starting to consider the following. 1. Doing a complete tear down for brake inspection, new grease seals that are required if the hub is removed every 5 years or 15K miles whichever comes first. I'm not recommending this, but having maintained and repacked TT wheels for over 25 years, IMHO this yearly requirement is overkill especially if you use the newer greases that also are more impervious to attracting moisture. 2. I think I might dump trying to fill the axle cavity after a complete tear down and inspection and lubricate both bearings via the grease fitting. I might just hand pack both bearings and not try and fill that hub/axle cavity with new grease and then each year or two pump in 10 pumps via the grease fitting while rotating the wheel to re-grease the inner bearing. Then I will buy one extra outer bearing that I will have prepacked and then w/o removing the hub and holding it in place, pry out the outer bearing and put the pre packed one back in and close things up. This will save me the cost of 4 new grease fittings (~$15 at current prices) and around $7 or so in un-needed grease sitting in that inner cavity. Remember, I'm not recommending this type of maintenance schedule, but IMHO it seems a more reasonable approach and a good balance between using some of the E-Z Lube axle features and still lubricating both bearing every year or so and at least inspecting the outer bearing when lubing the wheel. I'm also not looking forward during my next complete tear down in digging all that grease out of the hub. Larry
LarryJM 04/10/18 02:06pm Tech Issues
RE: Brake Job on 95 F53 ***Update***

Purchased our 1997 Rexhall in 2006 with 18,500 miles on it. One of the first things I did was replace the brake calipers with re-built ones from NAPA. I also replaced the brake hoses, and brake fluid. One of the reasons I went with the NAPA calipers was the metal pistons used (heard the stock, phenolic ones were not good) The calipers also came with guide pins incorporating stainless steel. Used permatex disk brake caliper lube when I installed the pins. Last year, after 35,000 trouble free miles (including a trip to Alaska and back), decided to pack the front wheel bearings and check the caliper pins. After repacking the bearings, re-lubed the caliper pins, reassembled, and everything is good again. Living in Colorado, going out of the state often means going over mountain passes. Never any sticking calipers or other brake problems. Just my experience, others may differ. Best regards, Lowell
eastfizz 04/10/18 01:12pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Packing ez lube bearings

Ok I pumped some grease in last year and...... like Reagan said trust but verify. Ill pull the hubs off and look but before I do can I have some advice? 1. what type of grease everyone like? I prefer Lucas Red N Tacky, or Valvoline Cerulean, or at times whatever is in the gun or on the shelf at the shop. We tend to be multidenomigreasonal. 2. packing a bearing...does everyone use the cone shaped packer or can I just use my hands to pack? Your going to get a grease bath anyway, just use your hand. 3. might as well buy seals beforehand....I have a crossroads cruiser. what type of axles are they and where best place to get seals? Online, get your axle weight rating, look them up and take a few measurements to make sure your ordering the correct ones. Timken, SKF, Generic....we're also very multidenomibearingonal. Send me a PM with your axle weight rating and manufacturer and I'll shoot you the numbers....Etrailer.com also has a wealth of info, and reasonable prices. 4. I looked into having done and its 200$. not a terrible price but I think I need to learn to do this. im pretty handy and I've done a few drum brakes but to be honest I've never cared to do them. disks are so much easier. Have at it..I for one am not paying some monkey $200 to pack bearings. Pre-load is important...You can go the rocket scientist route using a torgue wrench and usually getting the wrench nice and greasy in the process unless you do mechanical work like Hazel Burke. I prefer the old school method. Tighten it finger tight and spin the wheel, then another 1/4 to 1/2 turn with some slip joints and spin it a bunch of times. Then back off loose, re snug hand tight and put the pin to it. Have been using that method for years on dozens of trailers and back in the day cars when they had drum brakes. I have yet to lose or cook a bearing. https://i.imgur.com/dsdeDznl.jpg 5. any other thoughts before I tackle ? No, have a fun and greasy good time. You can make this simple **** as hard and complicated as you need it to be.
Ralph Cramden 03/22/18 02:54am Tech Issues
RE: Packing ez lube bearings

Have a look at this video . It is the Dexter "official" procedure for re-packing wheel bearings. Note the E-Z Lube zerk fitting in the video. Dexter themselves are demonstrating their official disregard for the E-Z Lube feature by basically acting as if it doesn't exist. -Speak That video starts out stating "standard bearings". Why would a manufacturer produce a video that goes against a feature they designed, patented, and promote? Perhaps when they produced a video to show how to hand pack bearings the trailer with the ez lube feature was the most convenient to use? Perhaps they think their ez lube system is junk lol. Funny how they also produce this VIDEO. This one starts out showing a boat backing down a ramp into the water but then goes on to show how to use the ez lube feature on a boxed equipment trailer. You can read into that however you want. I have used Dexters EZ lube, or have hand packed if I was pulling drums for other reasons, or a combination of both on many trailers without issues or blowing seals / contaminating brakes. That's 4 RV trailers since 2009, and so many box equipment trailers over the years from 8' to 24/26' used for construction that get highly abused that I have lost count. These posts go on and on here and at other RV forums just like an ST or Chinese tire thread, we use both of those also and my people abuse the hell out of them and everything else. A lot of people don't even know who made their axles and are posting on these threads. I'd put hard money down a lot of them had never known what a tapered bearing was until they bought an RV. Lippert also makes axles and their system is called Superlube, or Lippylube, or Jiffylube, or something. Same design but Lippert has been known to ship axles to manufacturers with the cheapest single lip seals they can source. Ask a lot of Grand Design owners the last few years about it and the issues they have had. Most people I talk to with Lippert axles call them ezlube also. IMO Lippert produces nothing but garbage, especially so when compared to Dexter. I have yet to see a new Dexter ezlube axle on anything that had a single lip seal. There are millions of boat trailers out their using bearing buddies that do not blow seals. That's an entirely different arrangement but it keeps constant pressure on the grease while the wheel is rotating and experiencing road shock....with no blown seals. That being said I would argue that maintaining positive pressure on the grease would be more prone to blowing past the seal than the grease pumped into the cavity which was only under pressure while pumping in through the zerk. IMO operator error, or as others have mentioned seals getting damaged by other reasons like the minimum wage nose picker down at the RV dealer pulling the drum for an inspection and bashing the seal against the end of the spindle. I use it and will continue to use it, and this thread and others will go on forever lol.
Ralph Cramden 03/22/18 02:40am Tech Issues
RE: Which 1 Ton SRW Diesel Truck Has Highest Payload???

Hi, I am the OP. Thanks for all of the information. I do have some additional information to ad that I guess I forgot to put in the original post. I am looking for a crew cab, 4x4, long bed in a Laramie, Lariat or LTZ configuration. This combination of features does lower the payload. Agree with the poster above that says that it should be easy to figure out given only 3 truck makers, but so far that has not proven to be the case. There are a lot of variables and you really need to compare apples to apples. All the advertised weights are for stripped down gas engines...and some are for the dually and not the SRW which does not help. I never thought this would be an issue when looking at new F350s until I looked at the door sticker and found that a truck that I thought from my research should have about a 3900 pound payload only had a 3200 pound payload. Big difference. Again, it seems from what I have seen that the Ram in a similar configuration is over 4000 pounds as shown by door stickers, but I can't figure out why there would be such a huge difference. To complicate matters, people on the ford forums tell me that Ford sells some of their trucks with a lower weight rating (despite no difference in teh truck) to certain states where the higher rated trucks are taxed as commercial vehicles. So the sticker weight may be "deflated" Not sure why this has been such a difficult search. Just don't want to buy the wrong truck to safely pull the trailer i am looking at....and really don't want a dually since this will be my daily driver. Matt I have read about Ford deflating some of their trucks specs as well.... I have never verified it though. It could be an internet myth. Something that starts out as speculation, and gets repeated enough times that many accept it as fact. If it was my money and it was important to me.... I would do my homework before plunking down the money on such a truck. You could look up part numbers for the different trucks on various parts. Several websites such as Rock auto Oriellys, even Ford could shed some light on it. Look at parts such as u joints, wheel bearings brake parts etc. Not as easy as just posting the question on a forum.. But definently more reliable. Don't think urban myth here is a link to the Keystone form, with a guy that bought a F350 SRW with a 10,500# GVWR. Low GVWR F350 A 2018 F350 4x4 CC GVWR ranges from 10,000 - 11,500. The F350 has a completely different rear end and spring pack compared to a F250 A 2017 Ram 3500 4x4 GVWR ranges from 10,300 - 11,500. The 3500 has a different rear frame section and leaf pack from a 2500 A 2018 Chevy 3500 4x4 GVWR is 11,600Fish, hate to tell you but your Ram info is wrong. Just ordered a 2018 3500 SRW yesterday with a GVW of 12,000#. Pulled the information right off Ram web site, and was a PDF for 2017.
FishOnOne 03/03/18 04:42pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Which 1 Ton SRW Diesel Truck Has Highest Payload???

Hi, I am the OP. Thanks for all of the information. I do have some additional information to ad that I guess I forgot to put in the original post. I am looking for a crew cab, 4x4, long bed in a Laramie, Lariat or LTZ configuration. This combination of features does lower the payload. Agree with the poster above that says that it should be easy to figure out given only 3 truck makers, but so far that has not proven to be the case. There are a lot of variables and you really need to compare apples to apples. All the advertised weights are for stripped down gas engines...and some are for the dually and not the SRW which does not help. I never thought this would be an issue when looking at new F350s until I looked at the door sticker and found that a truck that I thought from my research should have about a 3900 pound payload only had a 3200 pound payload. Big difference. Again, it seems from what I have seen that the Ram in a similar configuration is over 4000 pounds as shown by door stickers, but I can't figure out why there would be such a huge difference. To complicate matters, people on the ford forums tell me that Ford sells some of their trucks with a lower weight rating (despite no difference in teh truck) to certain states where the higher rated trucks are taxed as commercial vehicles. So the sticker weight may be "deflated" Not sure why this has been such a difficult search. Just don't want to buy the wrong truck to safely pull the trailer i am looking at....and really don't want a dually since this will be my daily driver. Matt I have read about Ford deflating some of their trucks specs as well.... I have never verified it though. It could be an internet myth. Something that starts out as speculation, and gets repeated enough times that many accept it as fact. If it was my money and it was important to me.... I would do my homework before plunking down the money on such a truck. You could look up part numbers for the different trucks on various parts. Several websites such as Rock auto Oriellys, even Ford could shed some light on it. Look at parts such as u joints, wheel bearings brake parts etc. Not as easy as just posting the question on a forum.. But definently more reliable. Don't think urban myth here is a link to the Keystone form, with a guy that bought a F350 SRW with a 10,500# GVWR. Low GVWR F350 A 2018 F350 4x4 CC GVWR ranges from 10,000 - 11,500. The F350 has a completely different rear end and spring pack compared to a F250 A 2017 Ram 3500 4x4 GVWR ranges from 10,300 - 11,500. The 3500 has a different rear frame section and leaf pack from a 2500 A 2018 Chevy 3500 4x4 GVWR is 11,600Fish, hate to tell you but your Ram info is wrong. Just ordered a 2018 3500 SRW yesterday with a GVW of 12,000#.
john&bet 03/03/18 05:26am Tow Vehicles
RE: Which 1 Ton SRW Diesel Truck Has Highest Payload???

Hi, I am the OP. Thanks for all of the information. I do have some additional information to ad that I guess I forgot to put in the original post. I am looking for a crew cab, 4x4, long bed in a Laramie, Lariat or LTZ configuration. This combination of features does lower the payload. Agree with the poster above that says that it should be easy to figure out given only 3 truck makers, but so far that has not proven to be the case. There are a lot of variables and you really need to compare apples to apples. All the advertised weights are for stripped down gas engines...and some are for the dually and not the SRW which does not help. I never thought this would be an issue when looking at new F350s until I looked at the door sticker and found that a truck that I thought from my research should have about a 3900 pound payload only had a 3200 pound payload. Big difference. Again, it seems from what I have seen that the Ram in a similar configuration is over 4000 pounds as shown by door stickers, but I can't figure out why there would be such a huge difference. To complicate matters, people on the ford forums tell me that Ford sells some of their trucks with a lower weight rating (despite no difference in teh truck) to certain states where the higher rated trucks are taxed as commercial vehicles. So the sticker weight may be "deflated" Not sure why this has been such a difficult search. Just don't want to buy the wrong truck to safely pull the trailer i am looking at....and really don't want a dually since this will be my daily driver. Matt I have read about Ford deflating some of their trucks specs as well.... I have never verified it though. It could be an internet myth. Something that starts out as speculation, and gets repeated enough times that many accept it as fact. If it was my money and it was important to me.... I would do my homework before plunking down the money on such a truck. You could look up part numbers for the different trucks on various parts. Several websites such as Rock auto Oriellys, even Ford could shed some light on it. Look at parts such as u joints, wheel bearings brake parts etc. Not as easy as just posting the question on a forum.. But definently more reliable. Don't think urban myth here is a link to the Keystone form, with a guy that bought a F350 SRW with a 10,500# GVWR. Low GVWR F350 A 2018 F350 4x4 CC GVWR ranges from 10,000 - 11,500. The F350 has a completely different rear end and spring pack compared to a F250 A 2017 Ram 3500 4x4 GVWR ranges from 10,300 - 11,500. The 3500 has a different rear frame section and leaf pack from a 2500 A 2018 Chevy 3500 4x4 GVWR is 11,600
FishOnOne 03/02/18 09:24am Tow Vehicles
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

I just pulled the drums on my ez lubes and what a mess. Good news, no leakage into the brakes. Brakes need replacing though. Pricing things out and wonder if the cost for never adjust is worth it. Thoughts? Also, are the bearings that come with the drum packages any good? The self adjusters are only as good as the tolerance held on the run out of the brake drums, and that can be very poor. I wouldn't pay a penny for them. I bought drums with bearings from eTrailer, and the bearings were pure Chinese trash that were failing in eight months. Get something other than made in China, I used USA Timkens. Buy good wheel bearing grease that is not an all purpose product and hand pack the bearings. Forget the grease fitting, I only use it once to clean out the passage before assembly. Read my thread under Towing for some other information that was countered by some on here. Link
Lynnmor 02/27/18 06:04pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

Hi Guys, Let me add some technical findings to the issue. I have been around machine building all my of my career and I'm now retired. You can build a shaft and seal to run true and hold back lots of psi of oil or grease pressure. They do it all the time on hydraulics. We are talking 1,000's of psi here. But we are not talking heavy duty industrial in this case. The seal leaking we are talking about in on an RV... Let's look at some of how the problem on leaking grease comes about. See this pic of out of our camper. It was bought used like that and we drove to PA to get it. Yes, a state that inspects trailers. At that time it had Alko axles and no EZ lube axles. When I brought it home, I went through the brakes when I changed the axles that were out of tolerance to know what I had. Sure enough, here is one drum https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4600/39357361761_22f3c4fe81_o.jpg width=640 This is non EZ lube and a standard hand pack by whoever did it and by who ever did the 2 years of PA inspections. This is the first time I had the wheel off. How did the grease come out? It was not the EZ lube as it did not have it. Well, they could have nicked the seal during an inspection, it could of been cheap grease with a low temp rating, there is heat involved from long distance towing that creates grease expansion pressure and there is centrifugal force of the grease flying around and it could of been the mechanical setup. It could be any of them or a combo. On a standard hand pack that was not that heavily packed, the grease had enough pressure/flow to works itself out of the seal that may have been compromised or had parts issues. Hold that thought, let's look how a trailer axle spindle and brake setup is made. If you have ever changed rear axle seals on a 3/4 or 1 ton truck and you go to the parts place, be ready to drop a $50 to $100 for 1 of those special rear axle seals. The rear axle casing is vented so it is not pressure seal, so why such a good expensive seal? Well, they do not want it to leak. When you go to get a trailer seal, the cost can be from $3 for a cheapo one to $7 for a Dexter double lip that works with their EZ lube https://www.easternmarine.com/dexter-2125-id-grease-seal-010-010-00 Why 10 to 50 times more cost for the truck rear axle seal then the trailer axle seal? Next, is the manufacture of the housing the seal is mounted in. If you ever look up the design spec's of the type of seals used in trailers, the seal and shaft are supposed to run true to each other within a small tolerance. See here when they talk about "runout" http://www.skf.com/us/products/seals/industrial-seals/power-transmission-seals/radial-shaft-seals/coaxiality-and-runout/runout/index.html Runout in this case means the seal needs to be running true to the shaft within about 0.004" to 0.005" TIR (total indicator reading) or else the lubricant can work it's way out the eccentric clearance between the seal and the shaft. I came up with that tolerance off the SKF chart since a trailer wheel of 27" (ST205/75R15) dia spins at around 685 rpm doing 55 mph. Larger tires spin a little slower, smaller tires a little faster. And a CRW5 and CRWA5 seal is close to what is used on our campers. SKF CRW5 The runout chart SKF Runout chart Granted there is a garter spering to help keep the seal lip against the shaft. But in time, the seal lip will wear more/deteriorate more the larger the runout is and inertia is always at work. So how good do trailer wheels spin? Well in my experience not very good. See my post from when I converted my manual adjust brakes to Dexter Never-Adjust Dexter Self Adjusting Brakes (long W/pics and details) I had one Alko original brake drum with 0.028" TIR runout. I called Dexter after I bought 4 new drums and their spec is 0.015" TIR. And 1 of the 4 drums was outside that. http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b378/JBarca/T310SR%20Camper%20Upgrades/Dexter%20Nev-r-Adjust/olddrum.jpg width=640 Basically the seal bore runs true with the brake lining surface. But the seal does not run true with the bearing bore. This is a machining setup issue but it doesn't matter as the spec is so wide open a lot of this is in spec. I asked Dexter, why can't these drums run more true like automotive does? Getting a seal bore to run true in automotive in less than 0.005" TIR is done all the time and 0.0005" TIR on disk brake rotors too. He said no one rides in a trailer and the vibration is acceptable where in a car it is not. He did not tell me it was to save cost, but in the machine shop world precision costs more $$$. Have you ever adjusted the manual brakes on your camper? Spin the wheel and you hear, skip, skip, skip of the drum only touching for a portion of the drum revolution. Why? The drums runout out that bad. Point: Yes, a "good" seal, on a "good" surface shaft, with a brake drum that spins "true", has "good" high temp grease has a chance of lube not coming out. The reality is this is an RV.... the seal is cheap, the brake drums do not spin true, shaft finish has issues, the grease type is unknown in some cases. Then with EZ lube we pack that seal side solid with grease right up to the seal edge trying to force grease through the bearings. And when that packed grease warms up from towing long hours, it can thin, expand and works its way out towards the brakes due to the runout issues and or a poor seal quality setup. I'm not trying to convince those that have had good luck with EZ lube to change their ways. Yours might be in the better machined side of the tolerances. Just pointing out how the trailer setup we have can fail. Do you really think these RV's are built to tight tolerances? Hope this helps John
JBarca 02/21/18 03:43pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

If you are in a state that requires annual trailer inspections, the inspecting place is often required to pull one wheel. They pull it, look and stick it back on. They also may have just nicked the seal putting it back on. They are not paid to put a new seal in. I need to do three inspections per year; one by me to make sure they won't add parts not needed, one by the official inspection station, and finally another inspection to correct the problems created by the inspection station. ""And that is one wheel from each axle. I have had seals compromised by them banging the seal into the axle end. I stopped one idiot from jacking from near the axle center, he said that he knew what he was doing. I have had dirty grease, of the wrong type, added to my repacked bearings after six miles of use. I have had lug nuts stripped. I could go on and on about PA's safety inspections, but I've mentioned it here before only to be countered by others."" Yes, here in PA, we are required to inspect every year, and they must pull two drums for inspection. The first time I got in there, I changed all the OEM china bearings and seals with Timken and CR, AND...dressed all the grease holes on the seal surface with a small grinding stone and hand pressure, and polished with crocus cloth, to guarantee they wouldn't cut a seal when reinstalling it. (doesn't mean they won't pinch it or crush it!) It's amazing how sharp those holes are from factory! I typically re-pull the same drums they do at inspection and go over then again before going too far (because, no, I don't trust their work). This puts me on an "every other year, two axle pack and check". On the odd years I don't pull the other two drums, I shoot about ten slow pumps of warm grease in the zirk for the rear bearings, and use a grease needle up front in between the rollers to get some fresh in there. It isn't perfect, but I'm pulling those other two axles next year anyhow, so it maximizes effective greasing while minimizing labor on my part. Lippert's grease system, similar to others, requires almost a full tube of grease to fill the hub space before any is pushed out the outer bearing. It's just nuts and it makes no sense. Hand packing is always better than any "maintenance free" system.
mosseater 02/18/18 11:28am Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

I bought my TT in 2017 and it has the EZ lube hubs, but.. When I bought it the RV mechanic that gave us the walk around was emphatic that we shouldn't mess with those hubs for a few years. He discouraged even squirting grease in them. I pushed him a little on that and he said that people regularly blow their seals out by trying to service the hubs. He said that if I wanted to I could maybe do one squirt a year into the hub. He also said, don't fool with them for ten years. Just tow it and don't worry about it. As a guy who has owned a few old Harleys with tapered roller bearings, and having personally repacked them at every new tire change, I'm really not comfortable with his instructions. I have pulled it for a few trips and the hubs are always cool. Hi Falconbrother, I 110% agree with you, the RV mechanic who stated the above to not mess with hubs for years, is not in the right context of a brand new trailer. I have personally seen too many brand new trailers with the bare minimum grease in a bearing pack. You go years on that and you will have a fried bearing at the most unwanted time. OH48Lt had stated the same thing so he must of seen this issue too. Since you know how to doing a bearing repack, pull the hubs, clean them out and pack them yourself. Then you know what your dealing with. Put a new seal in too. I have always done my own and at time of repacking them, they have never gone too long. I am on a 3 year 15 - 20K mile cycle for a repack. I cannot trust the brakes to be OK any longer then that so once the drum comes off for the brakes, a new seal is a must and I do the bearing repack again. In my case I have self adjusting brakes that I added. I do not know if you have had a trailer before, but unless you have the new feature of self adjusting brakes, they need to be tweaked/adjusted about every 2,000 miles. The standard trailer brakes do not self adjust. And since your trailer is brand new, odds are high they need a tweek now. The first 200 to 300 miles on new brakes is a need on this first interval as they are wearing/seating themself in. From there you can go the 2,000 miles. So if you are going to do a repack to know what you have on the grease and new seals, then do the whole thing with adjustment and start tracking time and miles from there. On the EZ lube feature, I'll add some to more to what I have heard from Dexter that OH48Lt had stated. The Dexter engineer I talked to stated, that they have had so many axle failures do to lack of lubrication from neglect that they started offering the EZ lube beyond the boat industry. The hope was that if the owner saw a grease fitting they might actually give it some grease in attempts to help save the axle from failure. As to using the EZ lube or not, as was said there is a long debate on this. I have it on my TT axles but never use it. The other trailers I have do not have it. The seals used in these trailers are so poor that adding a pumped greasing to the mix is a leak waiting to happen. If you are going to attempt it, jack up the camper and spin the tire while hand pumping slow. It your seal is bad, then you will have bad luck. If the seal is good, then you will have good luck. It's a flip of the coin. Hope this helps John PS. If you are in a state that requires annual trailer inspections, the inspecting place is often required to pull one wheel. They pull it, look and stick it back on. They also may have just nicked the seal putting it back on. They are not paid to put a new seal in.
JBarca 02/16/18 05:18pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

Pack the wheel bearings in your TT every time you pack them in your truck or car, or when you replace the brakes. Yep, same old technology and maint. that was used when cars had non-sealed bearings. After lubing my first few TT's every year, I finally realized there was no sense in it. So I let it go for 8 or 9 years and 50K miles before doing it again with the last one. At that point, it still didn't need it. This yearly stuff is just manufacturers covering thier arses. Check your brakes for wear and hubs for looseness yearly but yearly packing is a waste of time.Amen, if you have nothing better to do with your time, packing bearings is a fine way to spend time doing something probably unnecessary. I checked mine last year for the first time in 7 years, needless to say all was well. Spending a couple weekends packing bearings on my triple axle is not my idea of fun. However I'm pretty convinced that the EZ Lube isn't really necessary either. If the bearings are greased properly it shouldn't be necessary to add grease until the bearings/brakes are serviced again.
fj12ryder 02/14/18 06:48pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

Pack the wheel bearings in your TT every time you pack them in your truck or car, or when you replace the brakes. Yep, same old technology and maint. that was used when cars had non-sealed bearings. After lubing my first few TT's every year, I finally realized there was no sense in it. So I let it go for 8 or 9 years and 50K miles before doing it again with the last one. At that point, it still didn't need it. This yearly stuff is just manufacturers covering thier arses. Check your brakes for wear and hubs for looseness yearly but yearly packing is a waste of time.
ScottG 02/14/18 05:15pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

Pack the wheel bearings in your TT every time you pack them in your truck or car, or when you replace the brakes. Most vehicles have sealed bearings any more. And my Toyotas routinely run over 100K miles on the original brakes. Those are not good guidelines for RVs! Trailer Life website recommends annually or every 10K miles, whichever comes first. Grease also breaks down on stored trailers, from evaporation of the volatiles and oxidation from air. This is a good article from Family Handyman, which recommends every 20K miles, or annually. X2... I haven't read about any RV trailers using a sealed bearing pack like a modern car or truck. I do mine every two years, replacing the bearing as well, they're so inexpensive. Single axle takes no time. Haven't noticed any problems on the outgoing set, and plenty of grease still in place. Grease isn't burned looking or smelling funny.
GordonThree 02/14/18 05:04pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

Pack the wheel bearings in your TT every time you pack them in your truck or car, or when you replace the brakes. Most vehicles have sealed bearings any more. And my Toyotas routinely run over 100K miles on the original brakes. Those are not good guidelines for RVs! Trailer Life website recommends annually or every 10K miles, whichever comes first. Grease also breaks down on stored trailers, from evaporation of the volatiles and oxidation from air. This is a good article from Family Handyman, which recommends every 20K miles, or annually.
coolmom42 02/14/18 03:39pm Towing
RE: EZ Lube axles/hubs

Pack the wheel bearings in your TT every time you pack them in your truck or car, or when you replace the brakes.
K Charles 02/14/18 03:11pm Towing
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