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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Which Manufacturer--Best insulation? Help please.

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realdeal1003

Providence,Rhode Island

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Posted: 01/12/06 02:20pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello everyone. I would appreciate if anyone knows which rv company makes the best insulation for their rigs. My aim is to have the quietest class A or C made. Thank-You very much.

raygreg

Seattle,WA

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Posted: 01/12/06 02:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Look at: www.foretravel.com

kwagner

Torrance, CA

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Posted: 01/12/06 03:05pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bigfoot is generally accepted as the best insulated Class C MH. They are built in Canada and very adept at 4 season, cold camping. This is due to the best insulation in the walls, roof and floor, double pane windows, as well as a complete basement.

The side benefit of the additional thermal insulations is that the unit does drive down the road much quieter than our previous Winnebago w/o a basement or our Four Winds with a basement. However, this is just the starting point. Suspension modifications and how you pack you unit have as much to do with how quiet the unit goes down the road as the "insulation" factor. Both need to be addressed to get the best possible results.

The other reality is that a Class C will never ride as smooth as an upper end Class A, we don't expect it to. We make it as quiet as possible, starting out with a good quiet unit and pack to minimize addtional noise from contents.

Good luck,

KW


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minnie26a

Hartford, CT

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Posted: 01/12/06 03:33pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One thing that does help a lot I think are dual pane windows. Our Winnebago has them. It seems to be very quiet for a Class C. I think it rides quieter than our 2003 Dolphin Class A did.

I understand that a Born Free is very quiet also.


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HiTech

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Posted: 01/12/06 06:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Typically the Canadian brands have good insulation.

K3BH

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Posted: 01/12/06 08:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another vote for Bigfoot (with the winter option). Between the dual pane windows, the thicker walls, and the basements, the rig seems very quiet winter and summer, and it's easier to keep cool/warm as needed. The dual windows are likely the biggest factor for noise, I would think.

Jay


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cm

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Posted: 01/12/06 09:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bigfoot uses polyurethane foam for their insulation in the 3000 and 4000 series motorhomes. Urethane foam has a R-value rating of R-7 per inch. They also put insulation inside their aluminum wall studs. The typical manufacturer leaves the studs hollow with no insulation. The Bigfoot motorhomes use a 1 1/2" wall stud and their walls are R-12.

Also the typical RV manufacturer who uses foam insulation only uses expanded polystyrene "beadboard" also called EPS. It is only R-4 per inch.

If a manufacturer uses foberglass batt insulation, this has a R-value that is even less than EPS.

tatest

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Posted: 01/12/06 09:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thermal insulation values don't tell you much about sound energy absorption. These are two different problems that usually call for different materials for solution.

Two panes of glass block more sound from outside than single pane, all other window design factors being equal. But the window design might be more important, for reducing sound generated by the window.


Tom Test
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Gweber3369

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Posted: 01/13/06 11:25am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Take a look at Lazy Daze - three inches of fiberglass, double pane windows with air between them, fully insulated floor. No squeaks or rattles, and we regularly camp in single digit temperatures and stay toasty. We once did below zero with no electrical hookup, but the furnace ran more than half the time keeping up with it.

Gus Weber

mfh

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Posted: 01/14/06 09:31am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I will toss in my Xcursion as really well insulated - unless I put the slide out...They use a spray foam in the walls and ceiling - R18 and then the entire undercarriage is sprayed with a dense foam as well. With the slide out, there is a draft...but when it is in, it gets really warm. We set the thermestat at ~72 (we have babies so we need to keep it warm) and on the last overnight at 20 degrees the furnace cycled probably once an hour for five-ten minutes...

I do not have dual pane windows...no idea why the guy before me ordered single pane...I guess because the ones he put in there crank open meaning 80% of the window is open...where dual pane you can only open half the window. I would prefer dual pane - but I bought used...

Someone did tell me that the only concern with dual pane windows is that you will get condensation somewhere else in the rig - like on/in the walls...not sure if that is true...

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