RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: E 450 suspension

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > E 450 suspension

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Sponsored By:
chardel

Camden, ME

Full Member

Joined: 04/22/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/02/07 09:47am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On the longer class c's on the e 450 chassis has anyone come up with good suggestions to improve the ride and not be so hard over road bumps and highway expansion groves. I have a friend who has a 24 ft. and has tried bilstein shocks and firestone air rides in the rear and he said that has helped a lot but still not like other friends with class a's. Are the 30 - 31 footers "hard" riding like his 24 originally? and if so, would those additions help or have you found other actions that would help. Am leaning toward the 30 -31 class c on e 450 rather than kodiak mostly because of cost as we look into actually buying one and talking to a couple of dealers but dw does not want to have very hard & loud ride a things throughout the coach bounce and it would also cause dogs to not be very happy riders either. Thanks for your comments.

Cool Mike

No. California

Senior Member

Joined: 06/24/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/02/07 10:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Weigh the rig at all four corners, and adjust the tire pressure to whats required for that load, this is with the RV loaded as if you were on a trip.
Don't go by the max air pressure marked on the sidewall, unless that tire has its rated full load, check with Michelin's web site for recommended pressure vs load. And you should have about 33% of the rigs total weight on the front axle.
Other than that, have good shocks on all 4 corners. And you might look under the rear axel and see how much distance is between the rubber snubbers and the axle, most will have 2" to 4" of travel before they bottom out, springs can sag with time, and you didn't say if its going to be new or not.
Its hard to compensate for bad roads, and there are a lot of them out there, it will never ride or sound like a car, rather like a loaded motor home.


2001 27' Four Winds Class-C E-450 V-10.
Buick Park Ave Ultra, Ford Ranger PU, JD 500 backhoe.
1941 Farm All "A"

dicknellen

Fallon Nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 09/28/2004

View Profile






Posted: 06/02/07 01:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We had a stock 2003 Minnie 24' on E-450 and now have a 2004 stock Minnie 29' on E-450 chassis. The 29' is a much better riding unit, 29' longer wheel base plus has air bag helper option. Love the 29', Minnie model 29B (W329).
Regards,
Dick

DouglasC

Summerdale, AL

Senior Member

Joined: 04/03/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/02/07 02:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The problem with most motorhomes built on the Ford E450 chassis is that the rear axle is usually loaded to capacity. Any excess carrying capacity that the motorhome has is on the front axle. That means that the rear tires have to be inflated to their maximum (which is 80 PSI on Michelins) and that means a hard ride. I think that air bags are the only solution which will cure the hard ride in the rear.


Doug
2006 Jayco Greyhawk Model 27DS
Towing 2012 Ford Fusion Hybrid with Brake Buddy


journey fan

Los Angeles, CA, USA

Full Member

Joined: 08/05/2003

View Profile



Posted: 06/02/07 05:24pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As the posts above indicate, the best ride is a function of weight and running gear settings. The E450 isn't perfectly sprung and shocked on a Class C because it is just a mule for weight applications the factory can't predict. The factory shocks are too soft and wear out immediately. The springs are a compromise that are too stiff for light weight applications and too soft for fully loaded applications.

Add the Firestone air bags and learn how to adjust them to produce the best ride for the weight you have on the platform. They make a big difference. Replace the shocks with Bilsteins. That will help some more. Replace the tires with bigger tires that have taller sidewalls (e.g., go from 225/75 to 235/85). This makes a huge difference. Bigger tires also have a higher weight capacity, so you can run less air and have more sidewall to cushion the ride. You'll need to switch out the steel rims to aluminums to get the bigger tires to fit without a dually spacer, but it's worth it. The steel rims run hot, soft and heavy, and that slows down and randomizes your suspension reaction. Aluminum rims will help your ride and handling, and you won't believe what a difference the taller tires make. Bigger tires apply the balloon/air cushion principle of suspension design and will ease your pain.

I had a Mustang once that used the tires as suspension. Unbelievably stiff shocks, springs and struts - if you went to a low profile tire on that car you would need new kidneys. The Ford engineers used big fat sidewallls on the Mustang to cushion the ride. I switched my MH tires to 235/85 tires in the hope that the same principle works for MHs. It worked like a charm. Much better ride. Coupled with the Ride Rite system, depending on whether I am on the freeway or around town, and depending on whether the tanks are full or empty, I can get the ride I want. It's not perfect, but it's pretty good, and better than any of my 4wd vehicles. With fluids in the tanks and the right pressures in the tires and suspension, it rides better than a fair number of cars these days (the trend from 15" rims to 18" rims coupled with low profile tires is making cars ride much worse today, IMHO). The big problem that remains is that, unlike a car, the wheelbase is long enough to fall into the concrete sine waves that trucks carve into roadways, and that can make an otherwise decent road (to a car) seem a whole lot rougher in the MH.

On my 29 foot rig, more pressure is generally better, except for the tires, where less is better, but with gas prices so high now I keep more air in the tires than I used to in order to reduce rolling resistance. Good luck.

Greyeagle44F

Stratham NH USA

Senior Member

Joined: 07/21/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/02/07 01:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Shocks will not improve the problem your describe; that is not their function. Careful adjustment of tire pressure might well be the best you can do.


The U.S. Military: "All gave some, some gave all."

The Ancient Aviator

2002 26Q Tioga, Michelin Sneakers, Front XPS, Rear LTX M/S, no chassis "gimmicks" (Wind Machine sold APR 2006...pushing my luck at 84 years and a high performance bird).

Jeff N

Kansas City, MO

Senior Member

Joined: 04/17/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 06/03/07 02:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had an '03 24' Coachmen that rode like a tank and rattled your teeth and it had airbags and it was that way even when it was brand new. I now have an '06 30' Minnie Winnie with Bilsteins, airbags and Michelin tires and it's a hundred times better than that 24'.

Jeff

crawford

Dandridge Tenn.

Senior Member

Joined: 03/22/2006

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 06/07/07 08:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think you will find shorter platforms ride harder and hander hasker





This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > E 450 suspension
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS