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 > Whats Your Real Weights? Truck and Trailer. The Real Deal

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Tireman9

Akron, OH

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Posted: 11/12/12 09:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RGCG18 wrote:

The bank and I bought a ..........

2012 Chevy 3500 CC Short bed Diesel SWD with Allison transmission. We are looking at full timing down the road. Is there a standard form to determine weights and pulling capacities.
I have read that Chevy rates this truck to pull 17,400 lbs.

Someone give me a web site or printable form to determine weights and pulling ratings.

We are looking at 39 ft 13,400 dry..16000 GVWR..2480 hitch weight..axle weight 10,920


THIS page has worksheets on how to get the loads on each tire.

* This post was edited 12/11/12 06:09am by an administrator/moderator *

DRS1949

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Posted: 12/09/12 10:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TV/ 2012 Ford F250 FX4 6.2 gas 3.73 GVWR 10000 GCRW 19000 cargo 2550 weighed..7800 w/driver,hitch,full gas (35 gal)
GAWR f..5940 weighed..4320 GAWR r..6100 weighed..3480
Loaded Weight f..4440 r..5360 GVRW ..9800
Fifth Wheel/ 2013 Cougar High Country 299..33' 11" overall
GVWR 10000.. 4400 GAWR frt/rear
Dry.. pin..1450 weighed..loaded..1880
Dry..trailer..7720 weighed..loaded..7240 on axels
GCWR..TV/5er weighed loaded for camping,2 people..17040


2012 F250 Lariat CC FX4 6.2 Boss
2013 Cougar High Country 299RKS
Reese Elite 18K/non slide
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Tireman9

Akron, OH

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Posted: 12/10/12 07:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have completed an analysis of individual side to side and axle to axle variation in load. I note that out of the 500+ posts in this thread only two owners appear to know their real loads.
Most of you probably assume you have equal load distribution axle to axle and almost 50/50 side to side balance. The reality is you may have axle to axle split of 61/39 and/or side to side split of 41/59 with no indication which axle or which side is heaviest.

If you think you might like to avoid a multi-thousand dollar repair bill after having a tire failure you might find the information in my Dec 12 2012 post educational.

* This post was edited 12/11/12 06:09am by an administrator/moderator *

mdamerell

Fort Wayne

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Posted: 12/16/12 07:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I find this thread interesting and frustrating at the same time. Having driven class 8 trucks in all 48 contiguous states over the last 17 years, I have never had so many issues trying to ensure I am with in all my legal limits. I can find some of the information here and some there and even within the paper work that came with my truck, once I put it on the scale, I find a different story. Searching the web I find even more contradictory information.

Dealers have no idea what vehicles can legally pull what. I was told all I needed way a 3/4 ton, but as I do the math and weight things, I appear to be near the limits of what my book and I feel comfortable with, having a 1 ton dually to pull my meager 5'r (13,820# GVWR by the manufacturer's paperwork). Will have to weigh in the spring when reloaded for the season.

It's no wonder so many say "puck it" and just go!


2012 Sundance 3100RB w/Reese Goose Box
2004 Ford F350 6.0 L PSD, CC, DRW, long bed, B&W drop ball hitch, Firestone Ride-rite air bags.


Tireman9

Akron, OH

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Posted: 12/16/12 10:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Tireman9 wrote:

I have completed an analysis of individual side to side and axle to axle variation in load. I note that out of the 500+ posts in this thread only two owners appear to know their real loads.
Most of you probably assume you have equal load distribution axle to axle and almost 50/50 side to side balance. The reality is you may have axle to axle split of 61/39 and/or side to side split of 41/59 with no indication which axle or which side is heaviest.

If you think you might like to avoid a multi-thousand dollar repair bill after having a tire failure you might find the information in my Dec 12 2012 post educational.


I made a typo above my blog post is dated 12/10. I am posting parts of it here:
"Without knowing the real load you can't use industry guidelines on how much air you need to have in your tires.
Too many RV owners simply and incorrectly assume that if they get on a scale and learn the axle load they can assume they know the tire load because they simply divide by 2 and think the result is the tire load. In reality few motorhomes are balanced side to side and even fewer trailers are balanced between axles so towables tend to be worse off as they start down the wrong path by taking the total load on all the trailer axles and divide by the number of axles and assume equal load distribution. They then compound their error and further assume equal side to side loading."
"most RVs have no room for error and many have so little safety margin that they end up with one or more tires and/or axles overloaded."
on this thread with its 500+ posts I find the real tire loads were only posted by two owners. On other threads "I found that the best trailer had 50/50 on the front axle and 52/48 on the rear axle. This sounds good until you also look at F-R axle to axle split and find 61/39.If we look at the trailers with 50/50 balance between axles we see some as bad as 41/59 side to side."
"RVSEF has done over 35,000 RVs and recorded the individual tire load measurements. They point out in their seminars they have found some 57% of RV have an overloaded component."


40 years experience as tire Design & Quality engineer with focus on failed tire forensics.

Google "Tireman9" if you want to learn more on RV Tire Safety

j0hnburks

Birmingham, AL

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Posted: 12/26/12 07:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

5th Wheel/Gooseneck Truck & Trailer Weight Safety Report
from http://fifthwheelst.com/fifth-wheel-weight-calculator.htm

Certification Ratings Scale Weights

Truck Truck with Trailer Attached
Front Axle (GAWR) 1 4850 Total Front Axle Weight A 4500
Rear Axle (GAWR) 2 6100 Total Rear Axle Weight B 4780
GVWR 3 9800 Total Trailer Axle(s) Weight C 6640
GCWR 4 16000

5th Wheel/Gooseneck Hitch Truck W/O Trailer Attached
Gross Towing Weight (GTWR) 15000 Total Front Axle Weight D 4480
Maximum Vertical Load (Kingpin)3750 Total Rear Axle Weight E 3380
Automatically calculated at 25% (Industry Standard)

Never exceed manufacturer’s rating.

5th Wheel/Gooseneck Trailer
GVWR 6 9500


Section C - Report
Safety Margin vs. Overload

Truck w/attached Trailer Wt. 9280 Truck Front Axle -350
Truck Weight 7860 Truck Rear Axle -1320
Trailer Vertical Load (Kingpin)1420 Truck GVW -520
Trailer Gross Weight 8060 Truck GCW -80
Truck & Trailer Combined Wt. 15920 Hitch Tow GTW -6940
Vertical Load (Kingpin) 18% Vertical Load (Kingpin) -2330
(Recommended range - 15-25%) Trailer GVW -1440


Pops250
2010 F250 Super Duty
H&S Mini-Maxx, S&B Air Box, Sinister EGR delete, 4" turbo back EPF/CAT delete, Bilstein shocks
50 gallon TransferFlow inbed fuel tank
38' Heartland Big Country fifth wheel

RGCG18

Ohio

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Posted: 01/12/13 08:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NEW QUESTION....

We bought our TV this year.....2012 Chevy Silverado 3500 Diesel SWD CC. 3.73 gears

WHAT size 5er can we pull ??

Have NOT weighed our truck yet, but from the manual and sticker on the drivers door here`s what I have.....how heavy a 5er can we pull.

Max trailer....17,200
GCWR............24,500
Max pin..........3500
GVWR.............11,100
GAWR FT........5200
GAWR RR........7050
Tires......LT265/70R 18E

Going to a RV show this week...would like to know 5er limit ?

Thanks


RGCG18
Bob & Cheryl
2012 Chevy Silverado 3500 SWD CC Diesel / Allison
Class of 2018

avvidclif1

Texas

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Posted: 01/12/13 02:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Since you don't have any numbers on your vehicle loaded and ready to pull look at the Max Pin weight of 3500 and subtract the weight of the hitch you plan to use. Subtract another 1-300 lbs for misc junk in TV bed(tool boxes, etc). While shopping around the trailers will have empty weight and empty pin weight. From that figure the percentage of the trailer weight that is on the pin. Then go the other way and look at the GVWR for the trailer and using the percentage figured above calculate the max pin weight on the trailer when fully loaded.

Now that you are probably completely lost here's an example which will make sense. You look at a trailer with empty weight of 10,000 and it has a pin weight of 2000. That means 20% of the trailer weight is on the pin. Now look at the GVWR for the trailer (how much stuff you can put in it + empty weight). If it is 13,000 multiply that by number you found of 20% and you get 2600 lbs. If that 2600 plus hitch plus other stuff totals less than 3500 you are good.

Figuring the back way, most trailers have 18-20% of their weight on the pin. Subtract 500 for hitch etc gives 3000 for pin on TV. A trailer with a GVWR of 15000 and using 20% pin weight is exactly 3000.

Look at the numbers on any trailer that interests you. If the GVWR is 15000 or less you are probably OK. You will have to figure your own percentage for pin weight on that trailer if it's close.

Those are strictly my opinions based on what I have read. I'm not an injunir, I didn't even get a whiff of the fumes when the train went by.


Clif & Millie
Ozzie half a dog tall and 2 dogs long
2009 Ford F350 SRW CC Lariat 6.4 Diesel
2013 Crossroads Cruiser CF305SK Patriot Edition

Glen Schumann

Winona, MN

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Posted: 01/13/13 05:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

avvidclif1 wrote:

Since you don't have any numbers on your vehicle loaded and ready to pull look at the Max Pin weight of 3500 and subtract the weight of the hitch you plan to use. Subtract another 1-300 lbs for misc junk in TV bed(tool boxes, etc). While shopping around the trailers will have empty weight and empty pin weight. From that figure the percentage of the trailer weight that is on the pin. Then go the other way and look at the GVWR for the trailer and using the percentage figured above calculate the max pin weight on the trailer when fully loaded.

Now that you are probably completely lost here's an example which will make sense. You look at a trailer with empty weight of 10,000 and it has a pin weight of 2000. That means 20% of the trailer weight is on the pin. Now look at the GVWR for the trailer (how much stuff you can put in it + empty weight). If it is 13,000 multiply that by number you found of 20% and you get 2600 lbs. If that 2600 plus hitch plus other stuff totals less than 3500 you are good.

Figuring the back way, most trailers have 18-20% of their weight on the pin. Subtract 500 for hitch etc gives 3000 for pin on TV. A trailer with a GVWR of 15000 and using 20% pin weight is exactly 3000.

Look at the numbers on any trailer that interests you. If the GVWR is 15000 or less you are probably OK. You will have to figure your own percentage for pin weight on that trailer if it's close.

Those are strictly my opinions based on what I have read. I'm not an injunir, I didn't even get a whiff of the fumes when the train went by.


Cliff has it nailed. I would just add that how you load you trailer can have an impact. 100 lbs at the back end of the trailer (behind the axles) takes weight OFF the pin while 100 lbs in from of the trailer axles ADDs wieight to the pin.


2013 Redwood 34 SK (36'11", e slides, dual pane windows, self leveling, full paint)
2010 Chevy 3500 HD LTZ Crew Cab Duramax/Allison 4X4 LB
B&W Companion Hitch on Rollover Gooseneck Ball
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Granted

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Posted: 01/14/13 09:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Side to side is tooooo much damn trouble. W \e just now now got all the rest of ot1


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2000 F350 XLT LA West Custom DRW 7.3 PSD
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