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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > 1/2 ton towable travel trailers

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Kampfirekid

usa

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Posted: 01/29/09 06:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, if you search for my past posts, It'll give you more than enough to read on towing with 1/2 tons. Although a lot of it has to do with ratings, A LOT of it has to do with the trailer itself. Read my past post on the WORLD of difference I have experienced going from a 2007 Jayco 26L to a 2009 Heartland North Trail 31BHD. The trailer has meant a TON of difference.

My 2008 F-150 Supercrew is rated above 9,000#, and our North Trail weighs close to 7,000#. My 5,500# Jayco towed like it weighed 10,000# all because of trailer design. This said, I'd still not be looking at an 8,000# plus trailer for behind my rig, but if I were you, I'd look at a 2009 F-150 before anything else. IT is light-years ahead of the 2008's with all it's capacity and integration of the brake control, anti-sway control, etc. The six-speed tranny makes up for the poor powered 5.4L (compared to the 5.7L Yotas), and the thing is supposed to pull like a dream.

We just bought a 2008 Expedition with the six-speed, and I can't wait to try pulling the trailer, although my 2008 King Ranch Supercrew will be the primaryu puller until it gets traded in on a 2009 F-150 or a Superduty this year.


2013 Ford 350 Superduty Lariat. 6.7L Stock. Loaded.
2011 Jayco Flight G2 32BHDS

Lantley

Ellicott City, Maryland

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Posted: 01/24/09 03:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ch47d99 wrote:

Is not the point of a WDH to distribute that tongue weight to both tv axles and even some back to the Travel Trailer? That is what the Equalizer home page indicates. I also have heard of a video showing a vehicle with an Equalizer hitch driving without even having rear wheels on the tow vehicle. It also seems that passengers might distribute a bit between both axles. Short of going and spending an hour on a scale (which most people do not do), another technique I have heard is to try to keep your weight under what your Rear and forward axle weights together add up to. Seems logical to me. I am well within that on both travel trailers I am considering on my Armada.

While I agree most people may not spend an hour at the scale. I did and I suspect many other informed, responsible RV'ers do weigh their rigs. To ensure that your rig is properly set-up a trip to the scale is required. If one is not willing to weigh their rig and know (not assume) your real world numbers. Then all of the above discussion is just worthless diatribe. The only way to effectively know if your rig is properly set-up involves a scale, particularly if your towing at your limits.........
No wait! The brochure said this model could tow 10K. That's all I need to know. Honestly, the marketing dept. hopes you don't read the fine print or go to the scales either.


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Nspect

York SC

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Posted: 01/24/09 01:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For those that find all this confusing, it all comes down to this with 1/2 ton trucks and TT's:

Tongue weight plus passengers and truck cargo should be close to or less than the rear axle load limit of the truck.

The max towing capabilities really only apply to horse trailers and equipment trailers. You won't find a TT that is near the max towing capability that has not already far exceeded the truck rear axle rating. This can be tricked of course by stacking heavy items in the rear of the TT to "subtract tongue weight" and no doubt there are some that do that.


See our rig below, it is way below the max tow rating but if we added a couple of kids and more stuff in the truck bed we would be over the truck rear axle limit.

A rule of thumb is to take the manufacturers tongue weight and add at least 250 lbs to get the true "ready to camp" tongue weight then add your total loads in the truck. Then find your rear axle rating and see if you have exceeded it.


Bruce and Donna
2007 Forest River Wildwood 27RLSS
2003 GMC Sierra 1500 Z71 towing package
Putnam XDR hitch
Equalizer WD with 1k bars
Tekonsha Prodigy brake control


Nspect

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Posted: 01/24/09 02:29pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Without getting too technical, that is true and also with the weight of the fuel onboard.

8iron

Canada

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Posted: 01/24/09 01:59pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Nspect wrote:

For those that find all this confusing, it all comes down to this with 1/2 ton trucks and TT's:

Tongue weight plus passengers and truck cargo should be close to or less than the rear axle load limit of the truck.

The max towing capabilities really only apply to horse trailers and equipment trailers. You won't find a TT that is near the max towing capability that has not already far exceeded the truck rear axle rating. This can be tricked of course by stacking heavy items in the rear of the TT to "subtract tongue weight" and no doubt there are some that do that.


See our rig below, it is way below the max tow rating but if we added a couple of kids and more stuff in the truck bed we would be over the truck rear axle limit.

A rule of thumb is to take the manufacturers tongue weight and add at least 250 lbs to get the true "ready to camp" tongue weight then add your total loads in the truck. Then find your rear axle rating and see if you have exceeded it.


Do passengers in the cab get added to just the rear axle weight and not spread out over the front as well?


2011 F250 Lariat FX4
2011 Sunset Trail Reserve 29ss


ch47d99

VA

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Posted: 01/24/09 02:46pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Is not the point of a WDH to distribute that tongue weight to both tv axles and even some back to the Travel Trailer? That is what the Equalizer home page indicates. I also have heard of a video showing a vehicle with an Equalizer hitch driving without even having rear wheels on the tow vehicle. It also seems that passengers might distribute a bit between both axles. Short of going and spending an hour on a scale (which most people do not do), another technique I have heard is to try to keep your weight under what your Rear and forward axle weights together add up to. Seems logical to me. I am well within that on both travel trailers I am considering on my Armada.

LAdams

Northern Illinois

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Posted: 01/24/09 12:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

seb1899 wrote:

Remember it may have a "tow capacity" but can it handle it????


A good point by seb and I'll go it one better... In an emergency situation can both the truck and driver handle it???

All this conjecture about what a given truck can handle is fine given a nice dry sunny day and good road conditions and driving situation normal...

Now let's suppose your hit by a giant gust of wind, or some 4 wheeler cuts you off or slams on his brakes in front of you or worse... Will the truck and driver be able to handle it then???

Now I know what's coming, a lot of members will say that's a once in a lifetime experience and you don't plan for that etc., etc,...

Well, that's fine I suppose, but I like to plan for worst case and not best case... I've had my trailer come around and try to "kiss the front end of my truck" and it is a frightening experience... I was very glad I had as much truck as I did, and that my equipment was up to the task...

I'm not advocating that everyone needs overkill, but it is something to think about when your thinking about being at or stretching the limits...

Les


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sbingham

Payson, AZ

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Posted: 01/24/09 10:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ArticDodge said this: "I would keep your TT around 25 feet and less than 5000 lbs dry for a safe and comfortable towing experience." That pretty much sums it up! "comfortable towind experience"
See my signature.

Here is an example of my Northwoods Nash 25S. It is a VERY well made 26' trailer.

Listed dry weight= 4,567
Delivered weight (inside cabinet) = 5,040
Weight fully loaded with 58 gallons of water, etc (CAT scale)= 6,500
Factory GVWR = 8,000

Generally speaking, GVWR is a good indicator of construction quality, suspension system, and tires. Unless you have an inexpensive trailer, reaching the GVWR is pretty difficult. In your case, I would take a careful look at the DIFFERENCE between delivered weight and GVWR. As you can see from the example above, I still am 1,500 pounds under GVWR. Some similar size trailers will max out at 7,000 GVWR. Even then, I would be 500 pounds under. Now apply this information to your situation and you might be just fine.


Steve and Bobbie (and Shotgun - my 115 lb dog)
Down sized to a Nash 25S
My web page is www.dustylens.com


surveyorjp

Missouri

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Posted: 01/24/09 09:37am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

seb1899 wrote:

I apologize in advance - I did not read the whole thread.

Somewhere on this site there is a formula for figuring what you "real life" can tow. I did it last year and I figured that the max I could tow with my 5.3 Silverado xtended cab was about 6600 pounds.

Remember- you have to figure vehicle occupancy full tank of fuel, tongue weight etc,etc.

I purchased a Pilgrim 1500 lite and they told me it was "designed/engineered" for a 1/2 ton truck. I pulled this trailer and I felt that i was "maxed out".

I lost the trailer and the truck in a "rollover" on I 95 when the winds were high and probably no high profile vehicles should have been on the road.

I now have a Silverado 2500HD Long Bed Xtended Cab Duramax Diesel that has a rated tow capacity of 15000 pounds !!!!! and I bought a Jayco Jay Feather 25F.

Remember it may have a "tow capacity" but cn it handle it????


Many good points, and I will add this. Can the driver handle it?

TerryAllen also makes some very good points in his post that some folks with limited towing experience like to go overkill with the TV because they don't understand the sensations created by the trailer's influence on the tow vehicle. Naturally, if you use a 1 ton truck to tow a small trailer you are not going to feel as much influence from the trailer as you would if you used a 1/2 ton truck. For those with limited ability and experience, I suppose overkill is a good thing. However, there are those of us who are capable drivers and can safely use our fully rated tow capacity.


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bobbyg123

Duvall, WA

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Posted: 01/24/09 01:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As a 1/2 ton owner, it's refreshing to hear logical responses to this very important question. So many times, the knee-jerk answer to the 1/2 towing question is "NO, you have to have a 3/4 ton truck to tow safely." That's hogwash. It all comes down to following the REAL WORLD specs of the tow vehicle in question.

Pickuptrucks.com is a great site for researching this topic. I like their reviews because they test many of the trucks with a 7000lb trailer attached to them. They recently reviewed the new 2009 F150 and gave it stellar marks. Not only is it "rated" to tow over 10,000lbs, but the reviewer spoke to many of the other towing factors that affect performance. Transmission downshifting, trailer sway control, on-board factory brake controllers, wheel size, payload, etc.

It's all about following the rules and respecting the specs of your truck. I have a 5.4L V8 F150 with 3.73 gears rated to tow 9200lbs. A quality w/d hitch with anti-sway will give me the peace of mind to comfortably tow up to 6900lbs fully loaded. I won't race up mountains, nor will I speed down the interstate; however my set-up will be safe and that's the bottom line.


2008 Jayfeather 29A
2007 Ford F-150 5.4L V8

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