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Topic: OSB vs plywood flooring

Posted By: axisbuck24 on 03/04/09 09:58pm

Looking at purchasing my first travel trailer, but I am really confused about the flooring materials. Which is better and why? What is laminated flooring? Thanks


Posted By: longtrailer48 on 03/04/09 10:39pm

OSB "Oriented Strand Board". Lots of chips and strips all glued together under high pressure with resins. It costs less than plywood because of the use of otherwise discarded material, but does not have a grain like plywood therefore structurally not as strong thickness for thickness. It will damage and swell up much easier than plywood when repeatedly exposed to water. It's heavy, and it's strength is primarily in compression applications like a floor. Bottom line, developed as a cost effective alternative to plywood.

Plywood "peeled layers of wood" glued together with the grain opposite on each layer. There are many grades of ply, some for cosmetics, some for strength. Marine grade uses a waterproof resin to bond the layers and generally makes for a highly water resistant product.

Laminate flooring is just that. Wood laminated together, usually with the top skin being the "A" grade or cosmetic finish, while the structural layers being less costly than a solid piece of the "A" grade material. Laminate can also refer to any type of material (plastics) bonded together under heat and pressure.

Hope that helps answer a few of your questions? What application are you questioning all this for? The floor of your trailer?

-Jeff


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Posted By: axisbuck24 on 03/04/09 10:50pm

Yes, I was questioning the flooring. The Keystone trailer I am looking at has a Dynaspan flooring, which I am really not sure what that is.


Posted By: longtrailer48 on 03/05/09 12:10am

Dyna-Span* flooring is specifically designed and manufactured for RV’s. It is free of formaldehyde and VOC emissions.

It's OSB for RV's.

-Jeff


Posted By: fla-gypsy on 03/05/09 04:00am

You will find that most RV makers are using OSB flooring. Very few if any are using plywood.


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Posted By: Bumpyroad on 03/05/09 04:33am

and beware of some "laminated" flooring. some is actually paper printed grain beneath the surface coat, not actual veneer.
bumpy






Posted By: Lantley on 03/05/09 04:56am

Years ago typical OSB was inferior to plywood. Today that is not so universally true. OSB has evolved to products like Advantech others. While I don't know what type of OSB is being used by the RV industry. The comparison is not as clear cut as it used to be. The chips that were once discareded are being used in LVL's and micro lam beams, creating stronger materials and structural capabilities that previously didn't exist. "This is not your father's OSB!"


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Posted By: NHIrish on 03/05/09 05:34am

Agree with Lantley...I spec'd advantech when building my house, but you can bet that rv manufacturers do not use this high grade product. I would look for exterior 5/8 plywood as a flooring and exterior 1/2 inch for roof.

Also keep in mind that you will not find these in a lightweight unit.....you will have to make many compromises depending upon the cost and weight of the units you are looking at. Water damage is the biggest problem in rv's so you are wise to be considering this.


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Posted By: crab80 on 03/05/09 06:05am

Plywood is superior to OSB, except for the previously mentioned Advantech, which carries a 50 yr warranty and holds up well to water. I doubt it is used in R.V. construction because it is heavy and more expensive, but it would make one heck of of a strong floor. Having seen first hand what happens to regular OSB when wet, I would prefer plywood hands down if available, if they were the only two choices. Laminated flooring such as Pergo goes on top of the subfloor in the color or style of your choice.


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Posted By: curt12914 on 03/05/09 06:17am

NHIrish wrote:

Agree with Lantley...I spec'd advantech when building my house, but you can bet that rv manufacturers do not use this high grade product. I would look for exterior 5/8 plywood as a flooring and exterior 1/2 inch for roof.


Like OSB, many RV manufacturers will not use the highest quality plywood. Plywood can delaminate (separate) when it gets wet.

Many rigs that come with Dynaspan (and other similar products), construct the floor with one seamless piece. It seems to me that there would be less chance of a problem with this one piece floor.


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Posted By: Nomadac on 03/05/09 08:11am

When Travel Supreme was in business they used Marine grade plywood that was tongue and grooved at the edges for best fit. When I toured the Monaco and Newmar plants in Wakarusa, IN. they were both using the OSB material. Take a pc. and get it wet and you will see what happens if you have a leak in your RV, it bad. IMO You get what you pay for in most cases.


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Posted By: axisbuck24 on 03/05/09 08:39am

I guess I should have said about dynaspan versus plywood. Has anyone had trouble with Dynaspan flooring?


Posted By: just_dave on 03/05/09 09:00am

OSB is another word for sponge. As in, soaks up water like a sponge. If possible I would get plywood. Marine grade plywood would be an excellent choice, though I don't know if anyone uses it. - Dave


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Posted By: Dixonmatco on 03/05/09 09:37am

just_dave wrote:

OSB is another word for sponge. As in, soaks up water like a sponge. If possible I would get plywood. Marine grade plywood would be an excellent choice, though I don't know if anyone uses it. - Dave



True for what you find at Home Depot. Not true for the waterproof version used in modern RV's it is more waterproof than plywood. It also comes with a 10 year warranty against separation.


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Posted By: redwake on 03/05/09 10:19am

nothing wrong with OSB when properly framed/supported


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Posted By: javaseuf on 03/05/09 11:39am

Please see my reply in your other similar post about Cougar.

Keystone uses a Weyerhauser OSB-type material called Structurewood.
This product is waterproof and far, far superior to plywood. It also comes in 26' lengths which means less seams between panels which translates to less squeeking from panels rubbing.
When I worked at Rexhall, we used this product and we took a piece and submerged it into a vat of water. One month later it still floated to the top of the water, was as flat as glass and absorbed no water.
This product has been well proven in the RV industry and is a great product. My Keystone Springdale has it which makes me very happy.

Yes, particle board that you buy in Home depot is a very poor material for RV flooring but the products used in modern RV's isn't the stuff the general public buys. And BTW, Sturdiwood costs much more than plywood so manufacturers aren't using it to save money. They use it because it is problem-free which pays off in the long run if water leakage problems arise. It is also less labor intensive to install since it is 26' long. No cutting and fitting multiple panels together in trailers 26' and under.

* This post was edited 03/06/09 09:36am by javaseuf *






Posted By: mwebber78 on 03/05/09 03:06pm

Nice job Steve - good explanation. I spec'd my house and built with Advantech. It is FAR superior to plywood and is a reminder that like computers, TV's and vehicles you can't compare a product from 20 years ago to current products.

The OSB used on the floors from Weyerhauser is a good product and water resistant. I would not allow this to play much of a choice in my RV shopping. My Cruiser uses T&G plywood, marine graded. While it is a good material I can't say with a straight face it is any better (or worse) then engineered OSB products.

A more important thing to consider is the dealer and brand of RV, not the decking.


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Disclaimer for the daft: Don't confuse my opinion with facts.



Posted By: Tyoung1127 on 03/05/09 04:35pm

I just purchased a 2009 Keystone Mountaineer. It has the Dynaspan floor which comes with a limited lifetime warranty. I dont believe its warrantied against water though. The dealer said Dynaspan is not regular OSB (original sawdust board). Dynaspan suposed to have a resin all the way through it. You can expect RV manufactors to use the cheapest product a sale it as the cat's meow. I had a 2000 Sportsmen. I bought it new in 2000 due to its "marine grade plywood" floor. Well let me tell you,,that stuff rotted real good!!! I replaced a 3'x3' corner of my floor due to a leak. One thing I learned is,,, you got to keep them protected from rain.


Posted By: Gdetrailer on 03/05/09 04:57pm

Doesn't matter if it is marine rated or standard home center types of plywood or OSB, ALL will rot when exposed to standing water.

Even boats with marine rated plywood tend to rot out where ever there is a place for water to get into the wood. Many boats end up with lots of rot under the seats since the water gets past the bolts holding the seats to the deck. So don't be fooled into thinking a special treated wood will protect you from rot.

The only way to garrantee no rot is to be proactive about maintenance of the exterior.

As far as OSB vs plywood, hands down I will choose plywood for subfloor, walls (stick house), roof. Even though there has been improvements with OSB it still does not hold up as well as plywood. My BIL used OSB for a subfloor in his house, after a few years it was sagging in between joists.

Place OSB on its side (like a I beam) and it is rather strong but still not as strong as equivelent size of plywood. Lay it down and it sags under weight.

OSB has another issue, it doesn't hold nails or screws. Yep personally seen this, my brother had used OSB sheeting on the side of his house, then nailed wood siding over top. After several years as regular maintenance he had to break out the ladder and punch the nails back into place. No thanks!

Screws are just as bad, breaks out some of the chips then you have less material to work with. No thanks!


Posted By: Mike Up on 03/05/09 07:08pm

My Pop Up came with OSB, structure wood flooring. It was good but was not water proof. I didn't like having it and it was very possible to get soft spots from the sponge affect OSB has. I had a leak because Starcraft forgot to caulk the outside door frame. The floor wasn't damaged but did swell a bit. Service stated that when OSB floor takes water, they simply take a hammer to it to get the uneven spots out of it. It worked as my floor was not bumpy but it does swell with water and therefore, I would take plywood any day over OSB floor.

Laminate floors are something I would prefer to stay completely away from. I would rather have an OSB floor over a laminated floor. Laminated floors are just like laminated walls on fiberglass walled trailers, without the fiberglass. Simply sheets of very thin wood are glued to an aluminum (or wood) frame which has foam insulation cut to go inbetween the frame members. Many have commented that the floors get soft after a time because it's styrofoam that your walking on, supported by an aluminum frame and covered with thin wood. Laminated floors and walls also could have delamination problems where the floor comes unglued. I would stick to a standard, none laminated floor for many years of reliability. Not saying that the laminated floor will fail, as I'm sure some have held up fine. There's just the chance since is a glue together lamination. Definitely nothing like plywood or structure wood which IMO, are better.

I think plywood floors are best for strength and longevity. If there's a leak, they can rot as any wood, but they don't have the problems of OSB or that of a laminated/frame floor.

Just my opinion, which I would go with any of the 3 depending on the camper and floorplan. I wouldn't let the floor kill a choice unless I could get that same floorplan in construction I prefer.

From what I found with most RV makers, is that they mainly use plywood on their standard trailers, and laminated floors on their ultralite trailers. Few use OSB flooring. I was actually sad to see these same makers used OSB on their roofs, that used it in their floors, instead of plywood. I would never ever want OSB on my roof. I'd rather have a laminated roof than OSB on the roof. Nothing like having a rubber covered sponge just waiting to soak up water.

Jayco used Structurwood OSB flooring on their inexpensive Jay Feather Sport series in 2006 and 2007. I think they've now gone to laminated flooring.

My camper uses plywood for the flooring and roof.

Have a good one.

* This post was last edited 03/05/09 08:37pm by Mike Up *


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Posted By: mwebber78 on 03/05/09 07:12pm

I'm with Mike on the 3rd choice (laminated/unitized floors)- Stay away from them if you plan on heavy use. Walk through a 2 year old light weight that has the unitzed floor system, as Mike state the foam starts to compress which leads to a soft/spongy feeling to the floor. While it's not a defect it is a noticable distraction when walking on it.

I'd take engineered OSB or plywood over the unitized/laminated type.


Posted By: TURK2500 on 03/05/09 07:18pm

mwebber78 wrote:

snip....I'd take engineered OSB or plywood over the unitized/laminated type.

I agree


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Posted By: jvann1 on 03/05/09 07:33pm

Komfort uses Weyerhauser OSB-type material called Sturdiwood. Carries a 25 year warranty from Weyerhauser. Like what was already said, new osb products are not like the old OSB and is NOT particle board. I believe all new plywood is made with waterproof glues, but still has the exposed wood surface that comes apart and seperates.


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Posted By: Mike Up on 03/05/09 08:16pm

jvann1 wrote:

Komfort uses Weyerhauser OSB-type material called Sturdiwood. Carries a 25 year warranty from Weyerhauser. Like what was already said, new osb products are not like the old OSB and is NOT particle board. I believe all new plywood is made with waterproof glues, but still has the exposed wood surface that comes apart and seperates.


Weyerhauser Structurwood is what I had on the Pop Up and it does swell. Not good IMO. Sturdiwood is not on the Weyerhauser website at all, even doing a search. Is Sturdiwood from another manufacturer.

Here's Weyerhauser's RV Structurwood floor.

Here's Weyerhauser's Structurwood Edge webpage.

Here's the 50 year warrantied Structurwood Edge Gold.

Even the Structurwood Edge Gold is open to edge swell but it's more resistant to it than standard Structurwood. The Structurwood Gold with the 50 year warranty and resin composition looks similar to what other were calling dynaspan. It looks very heavy and costly.

Have a good one.

* This post was last edited 03/05/09 08:43pm by Mike Up *


Posted By: crab80 on 03/05/09 08:43pm

The floors in some of the ultra light trailers are a one piece composite sandwich which are difficult to repair if they get wet because you cannot cut out a small piece, and there are no floor joists to fasten it to like there is in conventional TT construction. To me plywood would be the strongest choice,you would not feel the soft spots when walking, although if it got wet there would still be problems. Another note about the Advantech, I put on an addition on my house 5 yrs ago and had a piece left over. I used this piece to make a door for a shed and it is still there, never painted, no warps, no rot. Regular OSB would have basically melted by now, which is why I say this stuff would be great for R.V. floors. But it is kind of heavy. JMO.


Posted By: Tyoung1127 on 03/05/09 09:27pm

Dynaspan is an all wood component. It is not constructed with sawdust or particle board. Dynaspan is made from solid wood that is cut into rectangular pieces. It is then treated with marine grade resin and laminated into several layers to improve its structural capabilities. In fact each layer of wood chips is laid in opposing directions for maximum strength and durability. Most importantly Dynaspan is much more resistant to damage from water saturation than most marine grade plywood that is often used by other 5th wheel brands.


Posted By: SteveRankin on 03/06/09 02:23am

Most RV manufacturers use OSB for one simple reason: because it's cheaper. OSB also has the distinct advantage of being available in long lengths so that the manufacturer can make the floor from a single sheet which makes it easier to avoid squeaks since there are no joints in the floor.

FYI, Northwood uses 2 layers of plywood, with a grid of approx 2x3's between them. The floor of our 29V Arctic Fox is made from 5 sheets of plywood above and below the grid. The space between the plywood layers is used for routing the wiring and adds another layer of insulation to the trailer.

IMHO, any RV will turn into a mess if there are water leaks--either internal plumbing or external joints--regardless of the material used. The RV owner needs to be diligent in regular inspecting their RV to ensure that there are no leaks. The better designed RVs have better inspection and service access to both electrical and plumbing systems. We learned a long time ago from boats to examine the boat/RV for good service access to everything. If we can't find ways to gain good access the systems, we don't buy it.


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Posted By: Bumpyroad on 03/06/09 03:49am

I thought that OSB stood for Oriented Strand Board. not sawdust. sawdust reminds me of particle board or whatever it is that weighs a ton, with no wood grain at all.
bumpy


Posted By: biggrigg on 03/06/09 08:06am

OSB does stand for oriented strand board and is not particle board. I think that a lot of people who are not familiar with construction associate OSB with particle board. They are a completely different animals. I am on the fence between the 2. I like plywood for sub floor and OSB for roof and wall sheathing. For those who have had to put 1/2" plywood on a roof that has sat covered on the job site for a while knows how aggravating it can be. It can get very wavy. When plywood first came out most doubted its structural integrity as well.


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Posted By: coolbreeze01 on 03/06/09 08:16am

jvann1 wrote:

Komfort uses Weyerhauser OSB-type material called Sturdiwood. Carries a 25 year warranty from Weyerhauser. Like what was already said, new osb products are not like the old OSB and is NOT particle board. I believe all new plywood is made with waterproof glues, but still has the exposed wood surface that comes apart and seperates.


Komfort currently uses Dyna Span for flooring.


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Posted By: Pete D on 03/06/09 10:14am

I see a lot of misconception in some of these posts.

It all depends on the glue! Have you ever seen interior plywood exposed to water?

I have seen a piece of OSB straddling a puddle outside a bar's side entrance, where it lasted for years. There was piece of it covering a meter hole in my condo's garden that has been there for at least two years and has no swelling, even mild surface swelling, and this is the Pacific North West!

Marine plywood is vastly over-rated -- Same wood, same glue, the only thing is there are NO gaps or plugs in the inside layers...

The real problem is the existence of a persistent leak, either from an appliance (a/c, water heater, plumbing) or a seam or window seal.


1998 Ranger 4.0 4x4
1991 Scamp 13'


Posted By: curt12914 on 03/06/09 11:50am

It seems to me that everyone thinks what ever their trailer has is best. I, personally, think there are pros and cons to each.

Plywood has several joints in the floor and is prone to separation.

OSB does not hold fasteners as well as plywood.

Has anyone actually had any problems with OSB or plywood, other than in a condition where there was a leak or damage that kept the floor wet for an extended period?

I disagree that the only reason a manufacturer uses one product over the other is cost. I think that most manufacturers are more concerned about their reputation and the longevity of their products, more than the subtle cost difference between OSB and plywood.


Posted By: jvann1 on 03/06/09 12:26pm

Quote:

Weyerhauser Structurwood is what I had on the Pop Up and it does swell. Not good IMO. Sturdiwood is not on the Weyerhauser website at all, even doing a search. Is Sturdiwood from another manufacturer.

Strange, I got the information right off the warranty papers! They said it was Sturdiwood and 25 year warranty from Weyerhauser. Maybe they have one manufacture and share resources? Or maybe the paperwork is not worth the paper it is printed on, it at least felt like paper!


Posted By: jeffandjodiplus3 on 03/06/09 02:11pm

I'm not into all this wood rot possibilities, I went with Pilgrim's Cosmolite floor. CosmoLite is a bi-directional, thermoplastic fiberglass and polypropylene composite. Think thay are still using the stuff in the new company.

www.goevergreenrv.com
http://www.tekmodo.net/pages/CosmoLite.html


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Posted By: Mike Up on 03/06/09 05:26pm

jeffandjodiplus3 wrote:

I'm not into all this wood rot possibilities, I went with Pilgrim's Cosmolite floor. CosmoLite is a bi-directional, thermoplastic fiberglass and polypropylene composite. Think thay are still using the stuff in the new company.

www.goevergreenrv.com
http://www.tekmodo.net/pages/CosmoLite.html


Unfortunately, the links you provide describe it as a laminate floor with cosmolite substituted for Luan wood. It would have the same negatives of other laminated floors, since the thin wood covering in these floors is rarely the troubles complained about.

Nice concept, but I'd wait before using it as a roof cover material as they state in the links you provided. Fleetwood tried all kinds of neat new roofs for their Pop Ups and the newest, latest and greatest, always showed the most problems. It was usually some type of plastic. I feel a tried and true, and established material is better than an unknown. Looks good but lets wait and see if it lasts, cracks, splits, sags, discolors, or even is repairable. Hopefully it will be the best but time will tell if it's even as good as what's been available for years.

Have a good one.


Posted By: pcpdof1 on 03/11/09 11:31am

The problem with a "one piece" floor is if you have any damage to it, especially water damage. It's easy to replace a piece of plywood, not so easy to fix a one piece floor. Also, many of the OSB floors and laminated floors will tell you they have a 12 year warranty or 20 year warranty (whatever), but they fail to tell you that they do not warranty against water damage!


Proud Owner of a 2008 Star Stream 24 QB (my silver beauty)!


Posted By: Island-Slacker on 03/11/09 09:56pm

OSB blows - I don't care what the pro OSB camp says or the manufs of OSB claim.

its cheap and easier to cut than plywood thats the reason why manufs use it comming in 26 ft lengths just means its cheaper to install on a trailer thats all.

if OSB was so flamming great and a superior product why is it not used for utility trailers? horse trailers heavy equipment trailers?

I had two homes both built to code 1 with OSB 1 with ply for the exterior sheathing under the siding and sub floors. the plywood constructed home - infinetly superior in everyway


Posted By: curt12914 on 03/12/09 02:38am

Island-Slacker wrote:

OSB blows - I don't care what the pro OSB camp says or the manufs of OSB claim.

its cheap and easier to cut than plywood thats the reason why manufs use it comming in 26 ft lengths just means its cheaper to install on a trailer thats all.

if OSB was so flamming great and a superior product why is it not used for utility trailers? horse trailers heavy equipment trailers?

I had two homes both built to code 1 with OSB 1 with ply for the exterior sheathing under the siding and sub floors. the plywood constructed home - infinetly superior in everyway


As posted above, there are a lot of different types of OSB. I know of some local contractors that advise strongly against using plywood in a building.

As far as in utility or horse trailers, I assume the reason they use plywood is so that it can be replaced in sheets, since it is exposed to water and /or moisture and is not uncommon for it to rot out when a trailer gets older. It would be very difficult (probably impossible) to replace a one piece product after the trailer is built.

It's great to have an opinion and you are certainly entitiled to yours. There are others that feel just as strongly the other way, especially about having a number of joints in their flooring.

Do you have any facts to back up your position?


Posted By: SJStrait on 03/12/09 06:40am

Have any of you ever used Advantec? It looks just like OSB but it has a 50 year warenty stamped right on it. I swear by the stuff all of my sub floors in my house are this stuff. When we biult the house we had to leave it for a month and it was ealy spring it rained every day the floor was uncovered and never warped or anything that was 15 years agoe still surdy as the day we layed it. I biult banquet tables with it very strong and i can leave the outside for weeks and nothing hapens. Check it out!


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Posted By: ddav15 on 03/12/09 03:09pm

coolbreeze01 wrote:

jvann1 wrote:

Komfort uses Weyerhauser OSB-type material called Sturdiwood. Carries a 25 year warranty from Weyerhauser. Like what was already said, new osb products are not like the old OSB and is NOT particle board. I believe all new plywood is made with waterproof glues, but still has the exposed wood surface that comes apart and seperates.


Komfort currently uses Dyna Span for flooring.


Georgia Pacific Manufactures Sturd-I-Floor and Weyerhauser calls their's Sturdi-Wood, my trailer has 5/8" Sturdi-Wood Weyerhauser OSB floor with no problems in 5 years and is firm to walk on.

* This post was edited 03/12/09 03:41pm by ddav15 *


Posted By: javaseuf on 03/12/09 06:04pm

Island-Slacker wrote:

OSB blows - I don't care what the pro OSB camp says or the manufs of OSB claim.

its cheap and easier to cut than plywood thats the reason why manufs use it comming in 26 ft lengths just means its cheaper to install on a trailer thats all.

if OSB was so flamming great and a superior product why is it not used for utility trailers? horse trailers heavy equipment trailers?

I had two homes both built to code 1 with OSB 1 with ply for the exterior sheathing under the siding and sub floors. the plywood constructed home - infinetly superior in everyway


While your claims may be correct for METRIC OSB above the boarder, our commercial OSB is much better down here.
And once again, the Weyerhauser and Georgia Pacific products actually cost quite a bit more than plywood. So when we exclusively used the Sturdiwood when I was building Rexhalls, it wasn't because it was cheaper, it was because in the RV application, it was superior to any other product because:

Having a 26' long piece produces less floor joints, therefore less chance of squeeks.

When submerged in a vat of water for 30 days, the product stayed flat, absorbed no water and was still useable.

Having one piece of flooring makes for a more sturdy structure as far as flexing.

And, the reason many other manufacturers don't use it in horsie trailers or utility trailers is because it costs more and because the product isn't well know in those manufacturing segments.
But, FYI, here is a Cut-N-Paste from the Featherlite website, a manufacturer of utility and horse trailers that do use a similar OSB product:

Featherlite Advantage flooring & walls
Featherlite enclosed trailers 1610 and 1611 feature sturdy, moisture resistant Featherlite Advantage wood flooring. The Advantage wood floor won’t soak up water or warp like untreated plywood might. The floors of Featherlite’s motorcycle trailers and ATV trailers have a thermally fused protective liner underneath to better protect the cargo. The Model 1610 also contains 3/8” thick Featherlite Advantage wood lining on the sidewalls.

Please, let's continue the debate. It's so easy to compete with someone that doesn't have all of the facts!

* This post was edited 03/13/09 10:15pm by javaseuf *


Posted By: Island-Slacker on 03/13/09 12:38am

you guys can blather on about "facts" all you want, you can post all the manufactures warranties and properganda all you want as far as I'm concerned they are meaningless manufactures are just promoting their product - do you think they would advertise the short commings?

I've seen for my self OSB exterior grade swelling up flaking crumbling on the edge ( leaning up against my garage) Ive also seen plywood in the same location - nothing wrong with it

All I need is the personal experience I have in working with plywood and OSB board ( yes I know the difference between OSB and particle board) ; and owning homes constructed from both products; as well as construction with it ( sheds benches etc) it is far softer to cut and screws/nails do not hold as well and that tells me all I need to know



I'll take plywood every time

you guys are free to sing the praises of OSB as much as you want - it will never convince me its a better product beacuse its not


Posted By: javaseuf on 03/13/09 11:33am

Sorry, Slacker.
I had no idea that you were so passionate and emotional about OSB and plywood. It wasn't my intention to ruffle your feathers!


Posted By: Island-Slacker on 03/13/09 03:35pm

javaseuf wrote:

Sorry, Slacker.
I had no idea that you were so passionate and emotional about OSB and plywood. It wasn't my intention to ruffle your feathers!



My feathers wern't ruffled - your posts and a couple of others struck me as condensending and know it all- lets educate the unwashed heathen north of the boarder living in igloos


Posted By: mwebber78 on 03/13/09 04:04pm

Well I thought you were unwashed and a heathen probably living in a igloo but I didn't let that skew my opinion that your post was useless and short on facts.




Posted By: Bumpyroad on 03/13/09 04:08pm

can't we all just get along?
bumpy


Posted By: curt12914 on 03/13/09 08:42pm

If you have no problem with them, there is nothing wrong with either one!
It's like Ford vs. Chevy or motorhome vs trailer. There is no right or wrong!!!


Posted By: javaseuf on 03/13/09 10:14pm

Island-Slacker wrote:

javaseuf wrote:

Sorry, Slacker.
I had no idea that you were so passionate and emotional about OSB and plywood. It wasn't my intention to ruffle your feathers!



My feathers wern't ruffled - your posts and a couple of others struck me as condensending and know it all- lets educate the unwashed heathen north of the boarder living in igloos


Oh, come on. I did include a smiley face in my post but since you still were offended, I sincerely do appologise.
And, I never would say that I know it all. I only share about this subject from the facts that I gathered with my direct use of the product, purchasing the product and seeing how the product performs over the years in an RV application in RV's that I manufactured.
Not much different than you sharing your experience with plywood and OSB leaning against your house as you had earlier shared.

And, I was just stating that there actually are horse trailer companies (Featherlite) using the product in response to your claim that manufacturers like this were not.
Again, so sorry. I am finished with this thread. Have a great week-end everyone!


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