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Topic: Super C not obvious advantages.

Posted By: kwilkins on 01/30/10 04:56pm

I’m in the market to get a Class C RV and want to understand the advantages/disadvantage of a Super C compared with a regular C. The only other RV I ever had was a pop-up camper about 20 years ago, so I have a lot to learn.

To me the obvious advantages of a Super C are the increased space and larger holding tanks, although in some cases regular C’s have the same size gray tanks as some Super C’s.

Here are a few of the things I’d like to know:

Driving: Is a Super C easier or harder to drive? Is it more comfortable or less comfortable? Is the road noise louder or quieter?

Clearance: I have an old dilapidated tennis court on my property that I would like to park my RV on. However; there is a bit of decline from the street to the tennis court and I’m wondering if the RV will get stuck trying to get onto the court. Does a Super C provide any advantages in clearance over a regular C?

RV Climate: Last year we rented a regular 31 ft Coachmen Class C for a week. We were camping in cold weather and the heater provided really uneven heat. It would go from too cold to too hot very quickly and the heater was constantly switching on and off creating large temperature swings. Will this be the same with a Super C?

Cost of Ownership: I’m guessing gas mileage with a Super C is lower than a regular C. Are there any other costs in owning a Super C that are higher?

Where can I go: Are there places a Super C cannot go that a regular C can?

Resale: Does a Super C have better or worse resale value?


Are there any other important differences that you think I should know about before making a decision?

I’m very interested to hear from people who have owned both, but I greatly appreciate all advice.

Thanks for helping a new guy out.

Ken


Posted By: tatest on 01/30/10 05:04pm

The chassis under what is claimed to be a Super C category have a higher GVWR, compared to the chassis under motorhomes not called Super C. Bigger chassis lets a manufacturer build a bigger motorhome than he was building on a cutaway van. That makes it Super.

Note that many manufacturers have been building motorhomes on Class 5 through Class 8 chassis for years, without calling them Super C. That term was a recent invention of one manufacturer (same one that applied the term "B+" to a C without an overhead) and was subsequently adopted by a couple others.

Most of the cost of ownership is the time value of the money you have tied up in it. A more expensive motorhome, whether it is larger or smaller, is more costly to own.

The resale value is also strongly linked to the original sale price, more than to a type classification.

Resale is also determined by marketability, how easy it is to sell; for the years I studied resale prices vs original (1990 through 2000) C's in the 24 to 30 foot range held their value better than 30 to 36 foot A gassers, which were the closest thing in size Super Cs. While I was shopping, the C's also quickly disappeared from the dealer's lots, while A's sat for months of step by step price reductions. Of course, in the future, market preferences can change.

You can't count a one manufacturer's C on a class 5 chassis to be built better insulated, or more suitable for year round use, than the C he is building in the same factory, using the same technology and materials, on a class 4 chassis. Where you find major differences in quality is between different manufacturers, not different sizes from the same manufacturer.

Differences in how well they drive will depend on how badly the manufacturer has overloaded the chassis. A small Super C at 60% of GVWR may handle better than a large C at 95% of GVWR, but the reality is that the jump to the heavier chassis was mostly accompanied by an increase in house size, to the maximum capacity of those chassis.

* This post was edited 01/30/10 05:41pm by tatest *


Tom Test
Itasca Spirit 29B



Posted By: SooperDaddy on 01/30/10 10:17pm

It's difficult to find a Class C with a diesel anymore, especially since Ford (#1 Van Chassis used for Class C's and Ambulance use) is not offering any diesels anymore. The choice is a V10 gasser. There are the Sprinter van chassis Class C's, but the towing abilities and payload are very limited, and the engine has limited ability as well.

A Super C can use a Freightliner or Chevy Kodiak cab chassis with a diesel, so there is the advantage...plus the additional payload capacity and towing ability. More and bigger slideouts, cargo room, towing a trailer or bigger TOAD are all advantages with the Super C's.


My posts shouldn't be taken for factual data, and are purely fictional, for entertainment purposes, should not be constituted as related to scientific, technical, engineering, legal, religious, spiritual, or practical advice. After all it's FREE! Amen.



Posted By: kwilkins on 01/30/10 05:22pm

Thanks for the info. I noticed the Super C's have automatic leveling jacks and the C's don't. Is that a big deal? Do the leveling jacks on a Super C enable you to keep the RV level on an uneven campsite, what about a "very" uneven campsite?

Ken


Posted By: big dave on 01/30/10 05:31pm

kwilkins wrote:

Thanks for the info. I noticed the Super C's have automatic leveling jacks and the C's don't. Is that a big deal? Do the leveling jacks on a Super C enable you to keep the RV level on an uneven campsite, what about a "very" uneven campsite?

Ken
Once you've had the automatic jacks, you will never go back.
I think of a super C as a class A with a cab. And it will cost more than a C.


Dave & Rose C
90 Safari Ivory 34' DP
04 Saturn VUE V6


Posted By: ronfisherman on 01/30/10 05:44pm

The Super C's have a little more ground clearance and handle better than the typical class C. The Kodiak based ones have a shorter turning radius than a van based class C. Noise on our diesel is quite enough to carry a normal conversation without raising our voices
Hydraulic jacks make the MH easier to level. Sometimes I need leveling blocks under wheels and jacks if site is way off level.
Our class C with the Duramax diesel engine gets a little over 10 mpg.
Height is just under 12'. Gas models get around 8 mpg.
There is more room in the cab of a Super C. I do not hear the complaints that many have about having a hot foot with the Ford C's.
The thermostat is a problem with a lot of RV's. Changed ours to a digital. Now temperature is + or - 1 degree.
Have not thought about selling ours yet. Hope it brings a good resale price.
These are large MH's that are built on a MD truck frame. Heavier all around. Maintenance on the gas versions are about the same as a standard class C. If repairs are needed on the Chassis a Medium Duty Truck dealer will be required. Most GM dealers will not work on them.


2004 Gulf Stream Endura 6340 D/A
TST tire pressure monitor system
2012 Chevy Captiva Toad

Super C Group Forum




Posted By: bowlturner on 02/01/10 03:38pm

I wonder why you say a more expensive mh costs more to maintain ?? I know people that have coach house or dynamax rv's that are 3-6 yrs old and the only thing done is tires and batteries and light bulbs, they are still in better shape than other rv's that are only 6 months old.


Posted By: ronfisherman on 02/01/10 12:04pm

Jason Nipp wrote:

big dave wrote:

kwilkins wrote:

Thanks for the info. I noticed the Super C's have automatic leveling jacks and the C's don't. Is that a big deal? Do the leveling jacks on a Super C enable you to keep the RV level on an uneven campsite, what about a "very" uneven campsite?

Ken
Once you've had the automatic jacks, you will never go back.
I think of a super C as a class A with a cab. And it will cost more than a C.
Not to bit nit-picky but I have auto leveling jacks on my Itasca Spirit E450 C-Class.

You can get HWH leveling systems as a factory installed option on the Itasca Spirit and Winnebago Outlook.

So I would stick to GWVR/GCWR and towing capacity as the 2 main advantages of a Super.

I'd get a super in a heart beat if I could afford one BTW.

But on many of the premium super C's they are standard. When looking at used you more likely to find jacks already on the MH than a standard C.


Posted By: Jason Nipp on 02/01/10 12:41pm

ronfisherman wrote:

Jason Nipp wrote:

big dave wrote:

kwilkins wrote:

Thanks for the info. I noticed the Super C's have automatic leveling jacks and the C's don't. Is that a big deal? Do the leveling jacks on a Super C enable you to keep the RV level on an uneven campsite, what about a "very" uneven campsite?

Ken
Once you've had the automatic jacks, you will never go back.
I think of a super C as a class A with a cab. And it will cost more than a C.
Not to bit nit-picky but I have auto leveling jacks on my Itasca Spirit E450 C-Class.

You can get HWH leveling systems as a factory installed option on the Itasca Spirit and Winnebago Outlook.

So I would stick to GWVR/GCWR and towing capacity as the 2 main advantages of a Super.

I'd get a super in a heart beat if I could afford one BTW.

But on many of the premium super C's they are standard. When looking at used you more likely to find jacks already on the MH than a standard C.
Yep, I understand and I agree that the vast majority of Super's already have levelers. I was just making the statement that you do not have to buy a Super to have/get levers.
And given the price difference between the C and Super C anyone could buy power levers for their C and still come in under the cost of a Super. Thus having standard levers is not a primary advantage in my humble opinion.

Oh and I'd still buy a Super in a heart beat if I could. I'd love a Haulmark or Embark.


99 Itasca Spirit 31T



Posted By: Jason Nipp on 02/01/10 08:31am

big dave wrote:

kwilkins wrote:

Thanks for the info. I noticed the Super C's have automatic leveling jacks and the C's don't. Is that a big deal? Do the leveling jacks on a Super C enable you to keep the RV level on an uneven campsite, what about a "very" uneven campsite?

Ken
Once you've had the automatic jacks, you will never go back.
I think of a super C as a class A with a cab. And it will cost more than a C.
Not to bit nit-picky but I have auto leveling jacks on my Itasca Spirit E450 C-Class.

You can get HWH leveling systems as a factory installed option on the Itasca Spirit and Winnebago Outlook.

So I would stick to GWVR/GCWR and towing capacity as the 2 main advantages of a Super.

I'd get a super in a heart beat if I could afford one BTW.


Posted By: jauguston on 01/31/10 09:59am

Super C's are popular with folks that want to or need to tow large heavy trailers. Lots of car racers use them to tow stacker car trailers with two race cars inside.

Jim


2005 Coachman Sportscoach Elite 402 40'
350hp Cat C-7 w/MP-8
7500w Onan quiet diesel generator
6-Kyocera 130w solar panels SB3024i MPPT controller
Pressure Pro TPMS
1987 Suzuki Samurai tintop Toad w/VW 1.6 turbo diesel power



Posted By: 1971duster340 on 01/31/10 02:46am

I think the Super C has developed into 2 catagories, but some would call the bigger of the two, truck conversions.
There's the Kodiak or Freightliner M2 chassis, then the Haulmark, Showhauler or even Kingsley class. Dynamax kinda covers both Super C sizes with products.


Greg
2007 Chariot



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