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Topic: Removing vinyl adhesive from luan plywood

Posted By: Replant on 11/26/10 11:25am

My vinyl wall covering was too badly damaged to paint. With the help of a heat gun I got it off without much trouble. However the adhesive remained on the luan plywood and I can give a long list of products that will not take it off. Has anyone actually removed the adhesive and successfully painted the walls?






Posted By: JES TCB on 11/26/10 12:09pm

Try a heat gun or hair dryer and a putty knife. Be careful with the heat gun. After you get the bulk of it off try an adhesive remover.


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Posted By: Replant on 11/26/10 12:41pm

JES TCB wrote:

Try a heat gun or hair dryer and a putty knife. Be careful with the heat gun. After you get the bulk of it off try an adhesive remover.


As stated in my post - I did remove the vinyl covering with a heat gun. The question is - what will remove the adhesive outside of a blowtorch? I can give a long list of products that I tried without a glimmer of success.


Posted By: Replant on 11/26/10 01:42pm

Raymon wrote:

What are plans for the luan paneling after getting the adhesive removed? If not worried about discoloration etc., might try a product like OOPS. I have never had any luck using any of the so called "adhesive removers". Another stronger product is Goof Off.

Goof Off is the lastest product that I tried. Smells like dry cleaning fluid. No luck with it. Goo Gone, acetone, deglosser/cleaner, paint thinner, lacquer thinner, Greased Lightning, Kaboom, Windex, Glass Plus, are just some of the other products that failed to work. I haven't tried WD-40 because I do want to paint the plywood. I did put some Kilz in an inconspicuous area but people say it won't work and will crackle in time.


Posted By: Replant on 11/26/10 03:32pm

Tomorrow I'll try something that sounds way out - fabric softener to remove the paste, not the vinyl. That's gone long ago. If it doesn't work at least the MH will smell better.


Posted By: Raymon on 11/26/10 01:13pm

What are plans for the luan paneling after getting the adhesive removed? If not worried about discoloration etc., might try a product like OOPS. I have never had any luck using any of the so called "adhesive removers". Another stronger product is Goof Off.


Posted By: mgirardo on 11/26/10 04:40pm

A little elbow grease and some coarse sand paper should take it off. You'll have to sand the luan before you paint it anyway.

-Michael


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Posted By: Replant on 11/26/10 04:52pm

mgirardo wrote:

A little elbow grease and some coarse sand paper should take it off. You'll have to sand the luan before you paint it anyway.

-Michael

I tried 100 grit sandpaper on a sanding block and it just glides over the surface.
I even tried sanding with the grain and the glue is still there. It must have really penetrated the luan.

* This post was edited 11/26/10 04:58pm by Replant *


Posted By: polock on 11/26/10 05:05pm

I am a woodworker I spray on paper to wood to cut out different things I CALLED 3M GLUE CO ASKED HOW TO REMOVE GLUE they told me to use a citrus based spray cleaner worked for me


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Posted By: Gdetrailer on 11/26/10 06:23pm

Goo-gone is a great adhesive remover, it is also a citrus based cleaner. However, it may not work well on POROUS surfaces like unpainted wood (like you have).

Chances are that you may need something way stronger than consumer citrus based removers. 3M pin stripe remover might work but I would be rather concerned about using any type of chemical remover in an small enclosed space like a RV.

Additional problem is the porous surface of the luan will absorb your cleaners, it may break down the glue that is holding the luan layers together and then you will end up having to cut the luan out.

My suggestion is to simply cover the existing luan with a NEW layer of luan (if you are lucky you might be able to find 1/8" luan) or if you really want to paint the surface cover with 1/4" MDF (one side is paintable smooth surface).


Posted By: daveor on 11/27/10 09:45am

why not just recover it with some more paper, then paint. would get rid of the glue problem. Might even find some paper that you liked, then you wouldn't have to paint at all,


Posted By: Replant on 11/27/10 10:59am

daveor wrote:

why not just recover it with some more paper, then paint. would get rid of the glue problem. Might even find some paper that you liked, then you wouldn't have to paint at all,


I just arrived at pretty much the same conclusion. Spent hours using a liquid fabric softener and water solution which got rid of the stickiness without a problem but the paneling was real smooth which means that there was still adhesive present. Sure smelled pretty tho.
Then I washed the area with ammonia and warm water. When it dried I was able to sand with 100 grit down to the lighter wood. I would say the area tested would be safe to paint but it would be too much work to do the entire MH using that method.

So I guess it will have to be plan B. Trouble is, we just wanted to paint with a very pastel satin latex - just a hint of color.


Posted By: Replant on 11/27/10 06:13pm

One thing I haven't tried is Zinsser DIF Gel.


Posted By: Ladybug43 on 12/06/10 12:16pm

Replant, you can purchase the paintable paper that covers any surface from Lowe's and maybe from Home Depot also. I used it in our home over paneling that I didn't like. After removing the paneling from a different room, the walls were such a sad shape, took forever to patch the holes etc so when we did the second room, we bought this paper and it looks beautiful and the paint we used was a pastel.
Hope this will help you..

oops, didn't look at the post date,, you are probably already done with your re-do


Posted By: Replant on 05/08/11 11:46am

Well, 5 months have passed and I just saw this post by alpenliter. Actually I saw their photos before but don't didn't remember the bathroom re-do. Too bad I spent all the time and money on the 3/8" knotty pine panels, etc. We thought wallpaper would have been easier but knew the the wall defects would have shown through. This paper would have been great. Oh well.


Posted By: Replant on 05/08/11 01:15pm

Ladybug43 wrote:

Replant, you can purchase the paintable paper that covers any surface from Lowe's and maybe from Home Depot also. I used it in our home over paneling that I didn't like. After removing the paneling from a different room, the walls were such a sad shape, took forever to patch the holes etc so when we did the second room, we bought this paper and it looks beautiful and the paint we used was a pastel.
Hope this will help you..

oops, didn't look at the post date,, you are probably already done with your re-do

Right on Ladybug. I should have looked more into the stock that Lowe's has. That's where alpenliter got their's. This is what I wound up doing. Area above the chair rail is primed and painted but I don't care for the result. The surface isn't as smooth as it should be. Maybe we should paper over the paint since it's holding up well.


Posted By: Lady Fitzgerald on 05/08/11 01:44pm

Anything that will remove the residual adhesive will probably prevent paint adhesion. Instead of removing it, mayhap you can cover it with new wallpaper or a paintable textured wallpaper. Wallpaper is a lot lighter than plywood or MDF and there are grades of textured wallpaper that will cover minor defects in the wall. Instead of prepasted, you probably would have to use an adhesive compatable with the residual adhesive on your walls, mayhap a contact cement? If you use contact cement, use a water based one. The fumes from solvent based contact cements are extremely flamable, ferocious on the body, and take forever to dissipate.


Jeannie


Posted By: fisher60 on 05/08/11 04:03pm

Try M.E.K. Available @ Lowes, HD, etc.


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Posted By: Lady Fitzgerald on 05/08/11 09:30pm

fisher60 wrote:

Try M.E.K. Available @ Lowes, HD, etc.


MEK would not be a good choice. The fumes are extremely flamable and won't do you a whole lot of good. The danger of using it as a cleaner in an RV is even worse than gasoline. Even though it is commonly used, many companies (including one I worked for) have banned it's use in favor of safer solvents (granted, the safer solvents are rarely as effective).


Posted By: Bucky Badger on 12/06/10 05:03pm

Have you tried paint and stain stripper..the thick pasty stuff?


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Posted By: fishbarned on 12/10/10 03:18pm

Replant wrote:

mgirardo wrote:

A little elbow grease and some coarse sand paper should take it off. You'll have to sand the luan before you paint it anyway.

-Michael

I tried 100 grit sandpaper on a sanding block and it just glides over the surface.
I even tried sanding with the grain and the glue is still there. It must have really penetrated the luan.

Just wallpaper over it. The have paintable wall paper. or cover it with a wooden veneer you can get it in 3' roles.It sis only 10mils thick and very easy to work with.


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Posted By: Replant on 12/10/10 03:46pm

Thank you all. Since the cabinetry is nothing more than plain wood covered by knotty pine design contact paper (shelf liner) maybe I should buy some at Home Depot and cover the walls with that. It's only about $18 for 18" wide by 75' long. For the floor I'd have to use something other than wood grain floor tiles so it doesn't look like wall-to-wall walls


Posted By: Hey there on 12/12/10 12:07pm

Hi Replant.

I learned this from Norm, the carpenter, on PBS. He said, to seal in wood oils or glue or "what have you", to paint over the area with White Shellac. I have tried it and it works like magic. You will then be able to paint your pastel color over the shellac. You could probably have the shellac tinted; then you would need only one coat. Also, no sanding needed.

Kurt


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Posted By: Replant on 12/12/10 02:48pm

Hey there wrote:

Hi Replant.

I learned this from Norm, the carpenter, on PBS. He said, to seal in wood oils or glue or "what have you", to paint over the area with White Shellac. I have tried it and it works like magic. You will then be able to paint your pastel color over the shellac. You could probably have the shellac tinted; then you would need only one coat. Also, no sanding needed.

Kurt

Thanks Kurt. If Norm Abram said it then it must be true. He's a master.


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