RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: Fiberglass Panel Repair (Long)

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Fiberglass Panel Repair (Long)

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Sponsored By:
Finally Fulltiming

Summer: NYS Finger Lakes; Winter: Someplace warm

Senior Member

Joined: 12/08/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 04/30/11 05:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I knew my 1999 Itasca had some delamination issues, but apparently I wasn’t paying close enough attention. The other day, driving 58 mph into about a 40 mph headwind, a portion of the side panel on the overhang got ripped right off & disappeared somewhere back up the highway.

Totally covered the exposed plywood with duct tape & continued on about 200 miles with no further problems. Not even a leak in the heavy rains. But now I’m left with a 2’ x 4‘ section of tape-covered “nothing” with a window in the center.

A Camping World salesman estimated they’d charge $4K - $6K to fix both sides (the other side has similar issues). Of course he’s more interested in selling me a replacement vs. fixing this one. But I checked with a local auto body repair shop & he was reluctant to even tackle it. Said he’d give it a try @ $50/hour but no guarantees.

This rig is perfect for me - has only 60K miles, no mechanical issues, 1 year old tires, gets 10.5 mpg & I love the floor plan. Really don’t want to trade. If I did, I’d likely wind up with a rig of similar age & unknown problems.

Complicating the whole situation is that, as a full-timer, I’d have to find alternative housing if someone else did the repair. Therefore I’m considering tackling the repair myself - with some help from better qualified friends.

More concerned with function than cosmetics. Even considering just applying another layer of duct tape & spray painting it white, but I realize that’s a short term fix.

Questions I can think of:

1. Anyone had a similar experience?
2. Is there framing of some sort behind the plywood? (plywood is not in great shape)
3. Do I have to be concerned with wiring behind the plywood?
4. Is there somewhere I can buy panels of a similar material that are relatively easy to cut to size?
5. Am I foolish to even consider doing this?

Sure would appreciate feedback from “those in the know”.

oldtrucker63

Harlan Kentucky

Senior Member

Joined: 12/10/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/30/11 06:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think you can do this job, It's not as hard as someone would think, You do have to watch for wires behind the panels and there is wood framing behind all this, I saw a cabover fix on here some time back that would show an ideal what it look like behind your panels, I will see if I can find it and come back and post it for you, Good luck with it buddy.


Without Trucks,....America Stop's

skipnchar

Topeka or somewhere else

Senior Member

Joined: 12/17/2003

View Profile



Posted: 04/30/11 08:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Try a different auto body shop. Should be an easy repair for them as long as they"re only doing the outside of the MH. If the inside needs anything have a dealer handle it.


2011 F-150 HD Ecoboost 3.5 V6. 2550 payload, 17,100 GCVWR -
2004 F-150 HD (Traded after 80,000 towing miles)
2007 Rockwood 8314SS 34' travel trailer

US Govt survey shows three out of four people make up 75% of the total population


fisher60

Plant City, Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 03/23/2006

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 04/30/11 06:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would like to venture a guess that maye, just maybe, a marine boat repair shop could offer some advice or maybe even tackle this. If you could find a panel a little larger than what you actually need, it could be attached and glassed in to make it look reasonably good.


'01 Dutchman Express 28A, Borg Chrome Dually Valve Stems, Pacific Dualies Wheel Simulators, '06 Tuscon, 2014 FLHTCUTG
Good Sam Life Member

oldtrucker63

Harlan Kentucky

Senior Member

Joined: 12/10/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/30/11 06:11pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is one of the cabover repairs.

Cab Over.

oldtrucker63

Harlan Kentucky

Senior Member

Joined: 12/10/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 04/30/11 06:15pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here is one more, These is not the one's that I was thinking, There is one on here somewhere the the RV is a lot newer, I did not find it But it is still out there, Maybe someone can help find the other cab over rebuild....Good luck.

1973 cabover rebuild.

tenbear

Northern Vermont, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/11/2004

View Profile






Posted: 05/01/11 06:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It seems to me that if the exposed wood is in good shape, you could put some fiberglass cloth on the wood and saturate it with epoxy or polyester resin. Maybe three layers would make it better than new. That's how some fiberglass boats are made. If you don't feel comfortable doing this, fisher60, above, has a good plan.


Class C, 2004/5 Four Winds Dutchman Express 28A, Chevy chassis
2010 Subaru Impreza Sedan
Camped in 45 states, 7 Provinces and 1 Territory


oldtrucker63

Harlan Kentucky

Senior Member

Joined: 12/10/2009

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 05/01/11 08:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

tenbear wrote:

It seems to me that if the exposed wood is in good shape, you could put some fiberglass cloth on the wood and saturate it with epoxy or polyester resin. Maybe three layers would make it better than new. That's how some fiberglass boats are made. If you don't feel comfortable doing this, fisher60, above, has a good plan.
I too think this would be the best and the most simple too.

Deleted-3

East Central Florida

New Member

Joined: 03/29/2010

View Profile



Posted: 05/01/11 04:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Phil Here. I am going to suggest a fix for your damaged siding on your Class C. Cut out the damaged section of siding ,plywood and all.
leave only bare studs, remove window.

Purchase approx size Plywood 24"X48" etc. Make sure it is the same thickness as the wood that you ripped out!

Now comes the strange part? Obtain from a building supply store a piece of white Formica, Contact cement the Formica to the Plywood.
Now you have a perfect panel to apply to your damaged Bunk area......

Most Class C's are manufactured with a Fiberglass or Formica sheet laminated to either Plywood or Foam board. I am excited ! I hope it works for you?





W4MBG

Williamsburg, VA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/15/2010

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 05/01/11 08:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

the exact same thing happened to my rig. thats how i ended up with it. the PO was quoted way more than the NADA value of the rig, so he sold it to me and he bought a new rv.

anyway, my plan is to remove the damaged luan on the outside of the foam, sanding down to the foam if needed. then i will glue a new piece of luan to the foam. i have already cut and painted a piece of thin plastic sheeting to fit, and that will be glued over the new luan. new stripes and she will be all fixed.


1999 Winnebago Minnie, 29', Triton V10, mostly stock. So far...


This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Fiberglass Panel Repair (Long)
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS