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 > Utah - Best Route

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Moosemuffs

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Posted: 09/05/11 10:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Is Route 191 from Flaming Gorge south Green River on I70 a good road for a motorhome with toad? Also Rt. 24 from I70 to Torrey and then Rt. 12 down to Bryce Canyon NP. From there we are looking at Rt. 89 south to Kanab. If the Rt. 24 road to Torrey is not good how is Rt. 191 south Moab thru Blanding, UT toward Arizona?


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Posted: 09/05/11 11:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We drove from Moab to Bryce last year and used routes 24 and 12 as part of the route. Route 24 from I70 to Torrey is no problem at all. A nice scenic drive. We spent a night at Thousand Lakes RV Park in Torrey then drove route 12 the next day. Route 12 is one of the best scenic drives in the country. From Torrey there is a long climb and descent in the Dixie National Forest, but the grades aren't bad. Route 12 is famous for the 1/2 mile long hogsback with steep drop offs on both sides. If you can keep the tires on the pavement on other 2 lane roads, you will have no trouble there. We really enjoyed route 12.


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TexasShadow

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Posted: 09/05/11 11:17am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

those are good roads, but you will cross some passes with tough climbs and descents at Flaming Gorge and on route 12.
There are some nice campgrounds south of the dam at Flaming Gorge, up in the forest. Firefighters Memorial campground is good, with water and dump available.
the town of Green River has a nice campground.
as stated, 1000 Lakes RV park at Torrey is nice.


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Moosemuffs

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Posted: 09/14/11 11:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is in response to the question as to the best route from I-80 to Moab. The trip from Rock Springs to Flaming Gorge was a real nightmare. South on Route 191 is a series of switchbacks that were very harrowing. After arriving at Flaming Gorge we talked to a trucker that traveled 191 for many years. His advice was golden and to the point. His best advices was no matter how good a driver you are, no matter how big your engine is, or no matter how macho you might think you are, respect Route 191. Here is what he said. Disconnect the car from the Motorhome and both drive to Vernal, Utah then hook up and drive the nice portion of this road to Duchesne, UT. At Duchesne, disconnect from the Motorhome and drive on to Price, UT and then hookup again for the nice road to Moab. Between Duchesne and Price Route 191 goes from 6000 feet, up to a summit at 9113 feet. To get to the top of the mountain there are many switchbacks and 8% up grades. From the summit down to Price, Utah is a 24-mile long series of 8% - 9% switchbacks. There are 18-wheeler pulling two or three bucket trailers of rock. They crawl down the mountain at 5 MPH smoking their brakes all the way. This is not the road to be towing a car or truck behind a Motorhome. From Price to Moab on Route 191 is a pretty nice drive. So take some advice, if you can get to Moab some other way try to avoid Route 191.

Lauren

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Posted: 09/15/11 04:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We were just there; stayed in Green River and drove the loop of Flaming Gorge. We had gotten advice NOT to take the RV on the 191 and did not. I am so grateful we did not and would not recommend it with an RV. Simple as that.


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c.traveler2

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Posted: 09/16/11 02:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Moosemuffs wrote:

Is Route 191 from Flaming Gorge south Green River on I70 a good road for a motorhome with toad? Also Rt. 24 from I70 to Torrey and then Rt. 12 down to Bryce Canyon NP. From there we are looking at Rt. 89 south to Kanab. If the Rt. 24 road to Torrey is not good how is Rt. 191 south Moab thru Blanding, UT toward Arizona?


Hwy24 from I-70 to Hanksville looks like this:


Goblin Valley State Parks is along this way, a ready well worth stop.

Hwy24 from Hanksville to Torrey, you'll be going through Capital Reef National Park, many wonderful things to see there.
Hollow Mountain Store, Hanksville


Hwy12 Torrey to Hwy89
Dixie NF. Hwy12

hwy12 narrows down in the Calf Creek area a very short run.

the worst area will be the Escalante.

Plently of fuel station along the entire route.
hwy89 from Hwy12 is a easy 2 lane road which will take you by the east entrance to Zoin NP, if you wish to make a stop there make a day of it(2-3 days) and drive your toad in.
Here's a link to Scenic Byway12
If you want more photographic information on Hwy24/12 go to my Travelingman2 link and look in the Utah trip galleries, I most likey have enought picture posted to cover most of this area.


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JimK

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Posted: 09/17/11 06:18pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We drove rt12 from Torrey to Bryce Canyon a few weeks ago. After much consideration and advice from locals we decided to leave the trailer in the CG and make the trip in the pick-up, returning that evening. Rt12 is a beautiful, scenic drive but it is only 2 lanes and very twisty and hilly. It has one 14% grade, a couple of 10%, and several 8%. And none of them are long, relatively straight runs. They are twisting 15-25 mph curves. The only RVs we saw during the entire round trip were a couple of shorter class Cs with no toads. We didn't see any class As or trailers.
When we left Torrey we continued on 24 back up to I-70, across to I-15, and down I-15 to Hurricane where we stayed in a beautiful RV park while we toured Zion and surrounding area.
. . .
We traveled Rt 191 south of I-70 thru Moab, etc. several years ago and it was no problem. Another scenic Utah road. If you do go through Moab, Both Arches NP and Canyonlands are must sees.

* This post was edited 09/17/11 06:25pm by JimK *


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Searching_Ut

Utah

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Posted: 09/17/11 09:38pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Trying to give good advice as to how suitable a road is hard because people have such different experience and skill levels. I would consider all of the mentioned roads as quite good and suitable for just about any RV, provided its set up to handle grades of 8 percent or so without difficulty. You see many Buses, semi trucks, and lot's and lots or RV's on all the mentioned roads. While you will find a lot of areas without shoulders, the roads are normal width, generally well maintained, and there aren't any switchbacks anywhere that I can remember that are sharp enough to make it necessary to drive out of your lane. Especially in the mornings and evenings you'll want to watch out for deer or elk, and you'll have to sometimes try to watch the road rather than taking in all the scenery but other than that I feel they're good roads.

Now if we care to discuss driving through a major metro area during road construction, that causes me serious white knuckles and anguish. If you try to drive through the Provo area on I-15 right now, that's a tough somewhat dangerous trip.

paulj

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Posted: 09/17/11 10:30pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I like your definition of a bad switchback:
" there aren't any switchbacks anywhere that I can remember that are sharp enough to make it necessary to drive out of your lane."

Based on some 4x4 trails I rode as a kid, I was thinking that a bad switchback was one that required a three point turn! For a kid in the back of a longwheel base Landrover or pickup that kind of maneuver can be a bit scary. Black Bear Pass above Teluride is the classic example in the USA of this.

In one of the Canadian National Parks there's a waterfall access road that requires RVs longer than 21ft to backup one of the legs of switchback (in the style of a few old time railway switchbacks).

Searching_Ut

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Posted: 09/18/11 10:16am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In this case, I was thinking of the vehicle configuration the OP was talking about when I mentioned staying in lane. We have quite a few mountain roads where although paved, the switchbacks are tight enough a larger vehicle, especially one towing something will be unable to make the turn without cutting into the other lane. I know of a few where turns like you described may be necessary with a longer vehicle, which rules out towing something.

As for the dirt off road stuff, now we're talking. I've been an avid off road enthusiast for 30 plus years, trashed a lot of trucks along the way. Now I just use a little polaris rzr as my off road machine. They're quite tuff, and much cheaper to operate in the long run. The best part about the rzr is that we've been in such tuff situations in it that now the DW doesn't consider any paved road as challenging, where at one time they used to scare her half to death.

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