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 > Stabilizer question

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LarryJM

NoVa

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Posted: 09/19/11 05:25pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wes Tausend wrote:

Sean Boburk wrote:

I had a storm bend my front two stabilizers. I think it would be cheaper/better for me to just replace them, as opposed to having my insurance get involved ($250 deductable).

My TT is a flagstaff, and I was talking to another flagstaff owner. He has something where he has a single leg come down from each side of his TT for his stabilizer. It sounds like this setup would take away more of the sway than my vertical ones. Does anyone have any input on this.

If I have to replace them, I would like to upgrade to something that reduces movement more. Does anyone have any more inputs, on something that will not break the bank?? Just looking at doing the front end now, since that is what is bent.

Thanks in advance,
Sean


Sean,

Perhaps some small tripod, quadropod, or large base bottle jacks that must be carried, and placed, separately would be more stable. Here is a $32 Camco jack from Walmart:


I found one at Menards that is a combination bottle jack/4-legged jackstand. Not as handy as built-in jacks of course, but I need to take it out of my pass-through anyway, to get at other things. I use the jack for tire change and to stablize the frame near under my steps which helps the entire TT. The steps themselves also need to be blocked under the bottom one for lowest bounce results.

Wes
...


I LIKE your thinking and what you showed is all I use now and get a rock solid trailer and have even removed the factory installed Stab jacks that went to the dump about 2 years ago. BTW what I'm using now is what I got for my prior TT almost 30 years ago and my estimate will they will last at least another 50 years with no maintenance needed. If you get the proper pressure on what you showed it's almost like have the trailer on cinder blocks like mobile homes often use.

As far as convenience using my electric tongue jack I find using what you showed actually easier than messing with the factory jacks.


Larry


2001 standard box 7.3L E-350 PSD Van with 4.10 rear and 2007 Holiday Rambler Aluma-Lite 8306S Been RV'ing since 1974.
RAINKAP INSTALL////ETERNABOND INSTALL


Sean Boburk

Texas

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Posted: 09/19/11 05:43pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I guess I was talking about something like the bal C chocks mentioned above by Will. Do these work better than the standard scissor chocks (pic is from the used TT section at a local RV dealer)?? Or am I just looking at spending more money for the same performance?


* This post was last edited 09/19/11 06:13pm by Sean Boburk *   View edit history


2011 Flagstaff 29SKBS
2010 F-150 4x4 5.4L
2011 camping days=23 in 9 locations
2012 camping days=4 in 2 locations

willald

NC

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Posted: 09/20/11 10:01am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sean Boburk wrote:

I guess I was talking about something like the bal C chocks mentioned above by Will. Do these work better than the standard scissor chocks (pic is from the used TT section at a local RV dealer)?? Or am I just looking at spending more money for the same performance?


..If you're asking if C jacks work better than standard scissor jacks, then YES, they do. Here's why/how:

Scissor jacks make great leveling/lifting jacks (although reality is you really can't lift with them at the corners of the trailer without risking frame damage). The bad thing about them, though, is that they do not provide much stability from fore/aft or side to side movement. The more you extend them, the less stability they provide in this sense.

This is why many people use large blocks under scissor jacks, to keep from having to extend them very far. This is also why its not uncommon to see stabilizer bars (like Steadyfast, JT strongarms, etc.) attached to scissor jacks, this give them more stability. I made a set of stabilizer bars similar to Steadyfast, have them attached to all 4 of my scissor jacks. Was a huge improvement.

C jacks provide much more stability at least in one direction - side to side. They also have a much smaller profile when retracted (provide more ground clearance), so they're less prone to getting scraped than a scissor jack. That is why I prefer them over scissor jacks.

Like I said before, if tomorrow I was forced to replace all of our scissor jacks, I'd order two sets of BAL C jacks and be done with it.

Will

Gene&Ginny

North Kingstown, RI

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Posted: 09/19/11 09:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes, there is a hex head on each side to lower each leg with a crank or in my case a 9volt DeWalt drill.

I should add, the whole crosspiece bolts to the frame rails on each side. Fairly easy to bolt on after the holes are drilled. Maybe it will even match the holes from your old, bent stabs.


Gene and DW Ginny
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Gene&Ginny

North Kingstown, RI

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Posted: 09/19/11 07:05pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sean Boburk wrote:

... something where he has a single leg come down from each side of his TT for his stabilizer. ...
This is what I have and it is quite stable. You can get it here



Sean Boburk

Texas

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Posted: 09/19/11 07:38pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gene&Ginny wrote:

Sean Boburk wrote:

... something where he has a single leg come down from each side of his TT for his stabilizer. ...
This is what I have and it is quite stable. You can get it here
Can each leg be lowered individually, in case the TT is not on flat land?

willald

NC

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Posted: 09/21/11 10:56am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wes Tausend wrote:

At first I was thinking that Bal C jacks would be just as flimsy as scissor jacks, because they work on the same principle. But, as you have made clear, they are different. The Bal C jacks have two less joints in them to allow unwanted fore-and-aft play.

On my last TT (Coachmen), there were two Bal C jacks on one end and two scissor jacks on the other. It seemed to work OK but we still got an unwanted fore-and-aft movement.


Well, to be clear:

C jacks are very good at eliminating movement, in the direction they are mounted. Meaning, in the picture shown above, and the way they are typically mounted pointing 'outward', they will eliminate side-to-side movement, not so much fore/aft.

If you wanted to eliminate fore/aft movement with these, you'd need to mount them pointed long-ways, parallel with the chassis, if that makes sense. I've seen some trailers where they mount two C jacks one way, two the other, to take care of movement in both directions. Not a bad idea, as long as its done so that you can get to the jacks easily enough to deploy/retract them.

But, yes, either way, C jacks are a nice upgrade over scissor jacks because of how they prevent movement better (not to mention their lower profile as I already mentioned). One day I may well just pull off all the scissor jacks on my TT, and replace them with C jacks. I'd no longer need the 'home-made' stabilizer bars I have on the scissor jacks, then.

Quote:

Some people reduce this by block-clamping the tires together, but, like Larry says, nothing will beat large-base jackstands except cement blocks.....


You know, I've always thought of Larry's approach with the 4 large base jack-stands, as something straight out of the Fred Flintstone era, if you know what I mean. Just seems so old-school, and that there HAS to be a better way than the methods that were used 50 years ago, haha. However, I can see where for some folks it could well work.

My big problem with it (Larry's jackstand approach) is, I'm afraid the way you have to put so much weight on those jacks in places the manufacturer really did NOT intend you to be putting weight/pressure, that you could eventually do some serious frame damage. Especially on many trailers built today that have lightweight (read: flimsy) frames underneath them. That, and many trailers have things in the way (i.e., a gas line) that would make putting the jacks in some from the ends like JarryM does, impossible.

The 10" I-beam chassis on my trailer probably would be OK with the weight, but the gas line that runs underneath the I beam on one side makes LarryJM's approach not an option for me (at least not without rerouting the gas line or other major modifications that I'm not going to do) Otherwise, I could definitely be tempted to try it out one day just to see.

Will

Wes Tausend

Bismarck, ND

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Posted: 09/21/11 02:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

...

Larry,

It's good you can verify that the jackstand type is more stable. It makes sense that it would be. Just the one jackstand/bottle-jack combo, under the frame, near my steps, steadies my camper significantly not only preventing "entry bounce", but by also resisting fore-and-aft movement. I can only imagine how nice four of them would be.

You did seem to imply that you could use the electric tongue jack to lift the TT up on the rear two pre-adjusted stands, and then lower the TT tongue back down on the front two, for effort-free stablizing. That how you do it?
====================================================================

Will,

At first I was thinking that Bal C jacks would be just as flimsy as scissor jacks, because they work on the same principle. But, as you have made clear, they are different. The Bal C jacks have two less joints in them to allow unwanted fore-and-aft play.

On my last TT (Coachmen), there were two Bal C jacks on one end and two scissor jacks on the other. It seemed to work OK but we still got an unwanted fore-and-aft movement. Some people reduce this by block-clamping the tires together, but, like Larry says, nothing will beat large-base jackstands except cement blocks.

I had already purchased the jackstand/bottle-jack combo prior to my current TT, but the 11 inch minimum height would not fit under the old TT, so I carried a small floor jack for tire troubles. But the jackstand/bottle-jack combo Menard sale deal was too good to return it and it does work great under our newer, taller TT. We are making good use of it now. It stores first-out in the pass-through, ready for tire trouble, so comes out first during camping set-up and further earns it's keep, under the TT, reducing structure movement near the main entry.

Below is an identical combo unit from Alltrade Tools:


A 2 minute youtube video demonstrates how it works.

Wes
...


Days spent camping are not subtracted from one's total.
- 2000 Excursion V-10 - 2000 F-250 CC 7.3L V-8
- 2004 Cougar Keystone M-294 RLS, 6140# tare
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...

aquarious

Marion Indiana

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Posted: 09/21/11 06:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Be carefull about enquireing about your coverage. Some insurance companies treat an enquirery as a claim I found this the hard way . My stick home burned and after paying for the damage my insurance was canceled. When I asked why I was told that I had too many claims. I had only 2 claims in 20 years but I found that they had counted 4 inquiries about wind and hail damage as claims. Getting back to stabilizers, I crushed both front stabs and I replaced them with 3 ton scissor jacks from Wallyworld. I will not crush them any time soon. Ed

Sean Boburk

Texas

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Posted: 09/21/11 03:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, talked to someone at the dealership, and he said the C jacks are more stable than the scissor jacks. He said the one piece unit is more stable than the C jacks...so that is what i ordered. Should be in tomorrow.

This is the type I ordered.


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