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 > Help Needed Finding A Leak

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LarryJM

NoVa

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Joined: 11/09/2007

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Posted: 11/03/11 02:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

webhannet wrote:

EXCELLENT bubble pictures - the best EVER on the subject!

"Doors" are always a problem, and rotted floors near doors are very common. Obviously, between the mounting of the door to the wall and the frame-to-door gasketing, there are lots of areas for leaking.

I'd suggest pulling up your flooring and replacing the bad subfloor, and then you'll have a clearer picture of where the leak originated. Before you rebuild, have someone hose the door area while you check for leakage. Of course, check the roof as you should every year. You might find it worthwhile to remove the door to look for evidence of a water trail.

I've used ETRNABOND in a VERY FEW small repairs, and it certainly has its place - BUT I'm not a fan of running it all over the trailer. Of the many yards of sealant used in a trailer or motorhome, very few feet (or inches) go bad - and regular maintenance would have sufficied to prevent trouble. "Regular maintenance" means running gobs of NEW SEALANT over and beside the old. The flexible sealants do work! Getting a tight bond with ETERNABOND over non-flat surfaces like the roof/wall joints is really difficult and usually messy looking. When you go to sell your unit, it's a huge RED FLAG to a buyer. Removing it to troubleshoot later troubles is a problem. I saw one beautifully restored trailer on which the owner made one non-original addition - ETERNABOND on the roof/wall seams. It didn't form well, water found it's way behind it, and it was a MESS. So please, only use it when you MUST.

Remember that leaks can travel. A leak at one end can travel to the far end along the inside of the roof top rail.


I guess all I can say is that I don't think you have any experience with Eternabond and I think the applications in my link in my signature look fairly neat and not messy looking like you seem to think happen.

I will take the Eternabond route over caulk any day and not look back.

Larry


2001 standard box 7.3L E-350 PSD Van with 4.10 rear and 2007 Holiday Rambler Aluma-Lite 8306S Been RV'ing since 1974.
RAINKAP INSTALL////ETERNABOND INSTALL


Livin Good

On The Road

Senior Member

Joined: 12/07/2008

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Posted: 02/21/12 01:42am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LarryJM wrote:

webhannet wrote:

EXCELLENT bubble pictures - the best EVER on the subject!

"Doors" are always a problem, and rotted floors near doors are very common. Obviously, between the mounting of the door to the wall and the frame-to-door gasketing, there are lots of areas for leaking.

I'd suggest pulling up your flooring and replacing the bad subfloor, and then you'll have a clearer picture of where the leak originated. Before you rebuild, have someone hose the door area while you check for leakage. Of course, check the roof as you should every year. You might find it worthwhile to remove the door to look for evidence of a water trail.

I've used ETRNABOND in a VERY FEW small repairs, and it certainly has its place - BUT I'm not a fan of running it all over the trailer. Of the many yards of sealant used in a trailer or motorhome, very few feet (or inches) go bad - and regular maintenance would have sufficied to prevent trouble. "Regular maintenance" means running gobs of NEW SEALANT over and beside the old. The flexible sealants do work! Getting a tight bond with ETERNABOND over non-flat surfaces like the roof/wall joints is really difficult and usually messy looking. When you go to sell your unit, it's a huge RED FLAG to a buyer. Removing it to troubleshoot later troubles is a problem. I saw one beautifully restored trailer on which the owner made one non-original addition - ETERNABOND on the roof/wall seams. It didn't form well, water found it's way behind it, and it was a MESS. So please, only use it when you MUST.

Remember that leaks can travel. A leak at one end can travel to the far end along the inside of the roof top rail.


I guess all I can say is that I don't think you have any experience with Eternabond and I think the applications in my link in my signature look fairly neat and not messy looking like you seem to think happen.

I will take the Eternabond route over caulk any day and not look back.

Larry


Yep a gallon of RMP and 50' of eternabond and you can build a brand new camper.

JJBIRISH

Butler, PA, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 10/06/2002

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Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/21/12 10:16am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Midnightpumpkin wrote:

webhannet wrote:



I've used ETRNABOND in a VERY FEW small repairs, and it certainly has its place - BUT I'm not a fan of running it all over the trailer. Of the many yards of sealant used in a trailer or motorhome, very few feet (or inches) go bad - and regular maintenance would have sufficied to prevent trouble. "Regular maintenance" means running gobs of NEW SEALANT over and beside the old. The flexible sealants do work! Getting a tight bond with ETERNABOND over non-flat surfaces like the roof/wall joints is really difficult and usually messy looking. When you go to sell your unit, it's a huge RED FLAG to a buyer. Removing it to troubleshoot later troubles is a problem. I saw one beautifully restored trailer on which the owner made one non-original addition - ETERNABOND on the roof/wall seams. It didn't form well, water found it's way behind it, and it was a MESS. So please, only use it when you MUST.



We are all entitled to our opionions, as for me, I applied
Eternabond to all roof seams on our present trailer when it was brand new. I still inspect the roof annually, but in 5 years, I have not had too touch a thing. I would do it again to any new or used RV I would purchase in the future.

As to the orginal question, I would recommend removing the door, and re-sealing it. I had a front window leak in the above mentioned trailer when it was 6 months old. It turned out the caulk was folded under in one corner. By removing the window and re-sealing it, the problem was permanently repaird.

John U



While I believe eternabond to be a good product, it isn’t utopia…

There have been many reports that I have read about it peeling and a few leaks, even though it was claimed to have followed directions…

As far as your use for 5 years as evidence, that is good, but my trailer is now 9 years old and the factory caulking it still doing a fine job and has never leaked or needed touched-up… the only leak I had was the dealer installed caulking on one of the fantastic fans and that was after 5 years itself…

While I have never tried it, I believe my 2 FF would produce enough internal pressure to do a bubble test… I am going to try it sometime…


Love my mass produced, entry level, built by Lazy American Workers, Hornet


dcb17b

foothills of the adirondacks

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Joined: 02/25/2007

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Posted: 02/26/12 09:03am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had a simular problem in my campers. If your door is near your awning arms then look at the bracket at the bottom of the camper that the arm hooks on. If the bracket is loose or the lag screws are rusty then the seal has been compromised and is letting water seep in. This problem rotted the floor of my hybrid just inside of the door and my current camper it rotted the bottom board that the aluminum siding is attatched to. The seal around the door is another area to check out too,although it can be coming from just about anywhere and migrating to that area. Good luck!!


2003 Ford F150 STX Supercab
2004 Dutchmen 24QBSL

ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Joined: 11/11/2010

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Posted: 02/21/12 06:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DIY Sealtech. Love it. Keep in mind with leaks that show up on the floor, the source can be far away. 2 cases in point. On my fiver, the basement had water in it on the street side. The source was a leaking screw on the range vent about 10 feet away on the curb side. Friend of mine has a TT with the floor rotted out in a storage comparment under the bunks. Source of leak was where the furnace vent went through the wall 8 feet away.


ERS

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