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Open Roads Forum  >  Fifth-Wheels

 > Running heater while towing

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laknox

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Posted: 01/05/12 12:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ofc950 wrote:

I am new to RVing during winter. I am not sure is I can run the heater in my 5er while towing it. I do know it would be wise to shut it down while re-fueling. Can anyone help?


I would only do it in an extreme situation, i.e. towing when it's well below freezing for a long period. You still have to keep your plumbing and tanks from freezing; not so much an issue with tanks, but the plumbing, hell, yes. You =don't= have to try and keep your FW at 68, but keeping it in the 40's to low-50's, will certainly help keep stuff from freezing. Might want to run a 12v fan, and keep your lower cabinets and drawers open, especially near the pipes.

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srink

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Posted: 01/05/12 01:11pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree with a previous post.
If the temp in below 40, we'll stop about an hour out and start the furnace. Never had a problem.


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Ofc950

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Posted: 01/05/12 03:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was mainly worried about the water tank freezing until ii get a little south. I do have what they call a polar package which should be good a little south of me. Thanks to all


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Slownsy

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Posted: 01/06/12 04:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A flame is a flame it only takes a spark not a camp fier


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phillyg

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Posted: 01/06/12 07:19am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't know any reason why you couldn't unless your manual says not to (or if you're pulling in to fuel up), but like a couple other posters, why would you want/need to? It doesn't seems to take long to heat up the inside after setting up, in any rig I've owned.


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Jonesz

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Posted: 01/06/12 08:50am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PHILLYG saidbut like a couple other posters, why would you want/need to? It doesn't seems to take long to heat up the inside after setting up, in any rig I've owned.

The reason we do this is because in leaving from a very cold climate heading South for the winter we like to run the furnace for the first day or so at the lowest setting to protect whatever we have inside from frost. Also when we get to a place with electricity we can then overnight without frozen beds etc. which do take a long time to heat up.
Jonesz

* This post was edited 01/06/12 09:06am by Jonesz *

ExRocketScientist

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Posted: 01/06/12 09:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jonesz wrote:

. . . snip . . . The reason we do this is because in leaving from a very cold climate heading South for the winter we like to run the furnace for the first day or so at the lowest setting to protect whatever we have inside from frost. Also when we get to a place with electricity we can then overnight without frozen beds etc. which do take a long time to heat up.
Jonesz


Not sure about the frost thing. I have never been able to generate any inside of my trailer, despite the fact I have been in temperatures conducive to it.

But you have an excellent point about the thermal mass of the contents of the trailer, including the beds. Climbing into a bed that is that cold will suck the heat right out of you, and if you are sensitive to temperature while you sleep, could result in a sleepless night.

I have posted my method for dealing with condensation (shut off furnace, open windows, exchange air in trailer for 5 minutes with Fantastic Fan, etc.) which works without a long recovery period of the furnace running because all of the furnishings basically stay warm during the process. But when I first arrive and turn on the furnace, it runs for about two hours getting everything up to 72 degrees. The blower runs constantly the whole time but you can hear the burner coming and going. After it shuts off the first time, it will cycle back on very quickly (within a few minutes). After about 4 or 5 hours, the pause between cycles has greatly increased (20 minutes or more).


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Monaco Montclair

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Posted: 01/06/12 09:11am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To me that's a waste, since nobody will be in there. And IMHO that's the most unsafe thing to do. I like my wife and frieinds more than that. IMHO happy. Camping

Jonesz

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Posted: 01/06/12 09:18am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ExRocketscientist if you look up the definition of "Frost" you will see that it includes and I quote "a degree or state of coldness sufficient to cause the freezing of water". I assure you that on several instance when we left here at -30 degrees that was the case. Groceries, tinned goods, water on hand and most importantly Mix for my adult beverage were at risk.
Jonesz

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Posted: 01/06/12 10:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jonesz wrote:

ExRocketscientist if you look up the definition of "Frost" you will see that it includes and I quote "a degree or state of coldness sufficient to cause the freezing of water". I assure you that on several instance when we left here at -30 degrees that was the case. Groceries, tinned goods, water on hand and most importantly Mix for my adult beverage were at risk.
Jonesz

Oh . . . OK. You are worried about contents of the trailer freezing. Good point. I know part of my winterization is the removal of all of that stuff, to even include toothpaste and Clorox wipes.

Although you might be able to rely on the thermal mass principle. Have everything warm before you leave the house. By the time you stop for the night, it should not have gotten cold enough for these items to freeze, although they will certainly be cold. With the heat on during your overnight stay, the stuff again gets heated up and the cycle repeats.

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