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 > Going alone??

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Buzzcut1

Norcal

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Posted: 01/18/12 05:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I travel alone quite a bit. I almost always Mt Bike or Road bike solo. I do pack a small med kit and sometimes I carry a cell phone but thats more for the picture. After years as a climbing guide, Scuba Instructor/ dive master , and mountaineer, I find that I pretty much take what I need for self rescue. I find nothing more annoying than the folks out in the backcountry with minimal skills, no survival supplies, no map no compass paniced and lost because the battery in the GPS died and they are "lost". Don't get complacent that the SPOT is gonna work and the weather is going to let SAR reach you, you have to carry what you need to make it out on your own. I can't tell you how many rescues we do in the local parks where we find folks less than a 2-3 hour hike to a road who have called 911 or triggered their SPOT


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LabMan1945

North Central Maine - God's Country

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Posted: 01/18/12 05:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"I can't tell you how many rescues we do in the local parks where we find folks less than a 2-3 hour hike to a road who have called 911 or triggered their SPOT "
You mean like the Massachusetts woman who called 911 to get out of a corn maize back at Halloween??
It is easy to be prepared with all the food, water, supplies etc but still have an emergency totally unrelated to being foolish and taking chances. I see those times when SPOT is a real benefit - not just to call 911 to get out of a self made problem that with a little thought can be solved by one's self.
Grant


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BradW

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Posted: 01/18/12 09:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I know a dude who went for a short hike in the Smokys alone to Mtn LeConte via Alum Cave Bluffs late in the afternoon. He misjudged the time/distance and it got dark on him. All he had was his cell phone. He managed to to get a NPS ranger on the phone and asked them to bring him a flashlight. They hung up on him.


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sleepy

Oak Ridge,Tennessee

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Posted: 01/19/12 05:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I lived in the woods as a child... every day after school until dark... all summer... I often had no idea exactly where I was... but I was never lost. I learned to navigate without a compass, a gps, or an electronic crutch. (It was hard in northern Maine when I was 18 years old, the woods are so dense you can't see the sun or moon, everything looks the same... I was proud that I learned to do it)

Part of the thrill of being allone in the wilderness is the problem solving skills that you acquire as you have emergencies... and the ability to recognize your limitations. i.e., knowing how far you can go into a cave by yourself, or who to trust to go into a cave with you.*

I can pretty much pick the people out on the forum that are self sufficiat and could be labeled "survivierists" ( people with a will to survive under all conditions)... I'll bet you can too.

I would be very embaressed to read a report that I'd survived over night in a broke down vehicle... even in a snow storm, as we often see on the news.... Shishhhhh!

Most people are wuss's... 'fraidy cats... that never learned the basics of survival... or practiced them. Any kind of survival.

I want to survive, on my own... and I want to be able to protect Janet... we've been joined at the hip for 49 years... a lot closer for the last 15 years. maybe the smartest thing a person can do is understand their limits.

* As for the cave... to heII with it... I'm not going in a cave, I've never said that I was crazy... ; > }


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bka0721

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Posted: 01/19/12 12:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DJ wrote:

I worry about you. Get a SPOT and put me down for a recipient. I will come help you. Always looking for a good road trip!~!~!
I have often thought about getting something like a SPOT. Like the time I ended up in the hospital in Arco, ID. That was a bad moment.

I guess my attitude is from all those years of working by myself, in the mountains with backup an hour away. My wife often was asked what she would do if anything happened to me, she would say; "I know where the life insurance policy is."

Count on it DJ, you would be on the contact list. Plus, you would just love where I am, for the next 6 weeks, your comnpany here would be enjoyed. Funny thing is, I have cell and internet coverage, miles from anyplace, here. Sort of like my backcountry site, in Yellowstone.

b

btggraphix wrote:

Put me down as well....not as someone else worrying about you, but as someone that would do my damndest to help if I knew you needed it.
Thanks for your comments. I am slowing down, some of it age, some of it other things, I am just able to see the details better, that I love so much. When I do make a decision of getting a locator, I certainly will put you on the list. I know personally how it feels, to see one of those familiar "shirts" show up when you need help.

b

I am starting to realize I need to start carrying more beer, for when people start showing up.

* This post was edited 01/19/12 01:20am by bka0721 *

kcabpilot

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Posted: 01/19/12 02:23am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Buzzcut1 wrote:

I can't tell you how many rescues we do in the local parks where we find folks less than a 2-3 hour hike to a road who have called 911 or triggered their SPOT


This is one of the reasons I'm not a SPOT fan. I don't care for the way it is marketed and operated and I've never considered it necessary to send messages saying "I'm okay" or broadcast a bread crumb trail over the internet.

A PLB is something that you activate only when you have no other options. Once you do it has to be returned to the factory to have a new battery installed and be restored. A PLB also operates under the COPAS/SARSAT system and can be located even if the GPS function does not work.

The SPOT works under a private company and relies on being able to obtain a GPS signal and if your annual subscription fee happens to not have gone through due a credit card expiration or such no one knows what happens. Because of the annual fees the SPOT is not cheaper than a PLB, it actually costs about twice as much over the five year period. (more if you want the tracking service)


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sleepy

Oak Ridge,Tennessee

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Posted: 01/19/12 10:18am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Technologies fail!

Common sense and training shouldn't!

I see nothing wrong with electronic devices as a possible back-up...

#1

Don't do anything extreme that you haven't prepared for...


Many people have a false sense of security because they have the latest and the greatest technologies.

Brads post proves my thinking in in its simplest form... a person with any training or common sense would use a number one rule in survival skills...just sit down when it got dark... Wait until morning and then continue out of the wilderness.

----------------------------------------------

Many years ago (about 1985) a small group of northern college students on spring break were caught by an unexpected heavy snow while back packing in the Smokey Mountain National Park. There was a lot of press... "whoa is me" over and over...

... after a couple of days helicoptors were sent in to rescue them... they were easily found... sitting around a nice campfire... enjoying the opportunity to try out their equipment and survival skills... freeze dried foods and high quality sleeping bags... they were singing and haveing a good time.

They were reluctant to leave... snows seldom last very long around here. They were enjoying their adventure.

The athorities forced them to board the helicopters... cutting their trip short.

The athorities actions irrated me then... (still do).

I thought at the time... I'd be torn between staying and getting a chance to ride on a helicopter. But I surely wouldn't need rescuing!


~DJ~

Boise, Idaho

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Posted: 01/19/12 01:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

sleepy wrote:

Technologies fail!

Common sense and training shouldn't!



This is the attitude that required my services for SAR!!!!!!

I say again, I don't care how much common sense you think you have, or training or equipment or experience.

You have an accident or medical emergency out by yourself and you can not get help, you're gonna die. It's that simple.

"Common sense and training shouldn't fail". RIGHT!!!! You have a heart attack or stroke out by yourself let me know how all that common sense and training will get you back to the truck 20 miles away.

You people scoffing at these communicators are not using common sense at all!!!


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~DJ~

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Posted: 01/19/12 06:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OK, I am going to disagree with some here. I've done my fair share of SAR with 28 years in the Sheriff's Dept. I don't care what you did as a kid. I don't care how much knowledge you have. I don't care how much equipment you have. I don't care how much experience you have.

You are not immune to accidents or health issues!!! Myself included.

Sure, common sense is needed to use these things. A couple hours away from the truck is no big deal. UNLESS you have a burst appendix or broken hip.

It really saddens me to read of folks needlessly dying for lack of a communicator. The 3 most recent ones were those who spent their money on a GPS instead and blindly followed it to their death!!!

A SPOT would have saved their lives!~!~!~! $$$$$ Really? $150 down and 9 bucks a month is not worth it?

We use our SPOT a lot. Not only does it go camping with me it goes on all my/her/our road trips. When I'm out camping out of cell range I send home "I'm OK" every evening. That feature right there is worth everything to my wife.

Out hiking I sometimes will send home "I'm OK" just to have a Google map location sent to my computer.

I am starting my 4th year with my SPOT and it has never failed.

JMHO

~DJ~

Boise, Idaho

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Posted: 01/19/12 06:48am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BradW wrote:

I know a dude who went for a short hike in the Smokys alone to Mtn LeConte via Alum Cave Bluffs late in the afternoon. He misjudged the time/distance and it got dark on him. All he had was his cell phone. He managed to to get a NPS ranger on the phone and asked them to bring him a flashlight. They hung up on him.


And there is a Ranger who needs a good sound ass kickin'!!!!

Sure the guy went unprepared and was no one's fault but his own to be in that predicament. He made a mistake. A mistake that could have injured or killed him. Happens every day.

So why did this Ranger choose to become a public servant just to hang up on folks who made a mistake and needed his help?

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