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Open Roads Forum  >  Fifth-Wheels

 > trailer tires for 5th wheel

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kedanie

Albuquerque, NM

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Posted: 01/26/12 03:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3Fivers51 wrote:

I was just at a tire dealer today and they said it is not recommended to put a LT tire on a trailer application. My size is the problem I guess. 225/75R15D. So I asked them about 235/75R15D and they said again about putting LT's on trailers. The ST tire has a better side wall strength than the LT. Now this tire place in my mind is reputable. So does anyone have any new found wisdom to dispute what I just said?
Thanks,,,,,Bill

Keep in mind that the tire store's main goal is to sell tires at a profit. ST tires are generally cheap for the store to buy and they get sold at a good profit margin. Add to that the fact that the average life of a ST tire is less than 3 years, he'll make more money selling tires that get replaced more often.

The others here have given some good options. Do your homework and buy what makes you comfortable. There are options.

Keith


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sandpiper1

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Posted: 01/26/12 04:05pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was just at a tire dealer today and they said it is not recommended to put a LT tire on a trailer application. My size is the problem I guess. 225/75R15D. So I asked them about 235/75R15D and they said again about putting LT's on trailers. The ST tire has a better side wall strength than the LT. Now this tire place in my mind is reputable. So does anyone have any new found wisdom to dispute what I just said?
Thanks,,,,,Bill

I think they are wrong. My previous 5th wheel came with LT tires. It was right on the metal placard, LT235/85/16LRE from the factory. Only problem was they were made in Tiawan and didn't last. The very high line Montanas still list an LT tire as the factory spec. I used Uniroyal on my last one and BFG Commercial TA on this one.


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laknox

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Posted: 01/26/12 04:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3Fivers51 wrote:

I currently have the original tires that came with my 5th wheel and been getting some advice about getting something better. Doing the longer haul thing not just intrastate travel. Had one tire dealer want to sell me Mastercraft tires. I have also researched the LT versus ST and convinced that LT is the way to go. Anyone have some suggestions?


Forgot to mention... No matter which route you go, but especially if you buy another set of ST's, keep your tires fully covered, off the ground (I use redwood boards) and use a =good= dressing on them. Do not use an Armorall-type protectant as they actually dry out the rubber faster; most people like Aerospace 303 as it actually =adds= back some of the volatile compounds that "look-good" dressings take out.

Lyle


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ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Posted: 01/27/12 05:19am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The cords in the sidewalls of ST tires are larger than those in LT tires. This is why when you compare an ST tire to an LT tire where the physical dimensions are the same, the ST tire will have a higher load rating at a lower air pressure than the LT tire.

That said, look at the load rating. When you compare an ST tire of one load rating to an LT tire of similar load rating, the LT tire will usually maintain that load rating under more severe service conditions. The word "usually" here is my opinion and deserves some explanation. It all goes back to what I said about the difference in the testing standards. It is my gut feeling that most tires are built to barely meet the DOT specifications for the type with notable exceptions like the Maxxis M8008 (ST tire), the Michelin XPS Rib (steel carcass LT), and Bridgestone Duravis R250 (steel carcass LT).

The other thing you will notice about the comparison of the ST and LT tire with similar weight ratings is the LT tire will be physically bigger and the max inflation pressure with be 15 PSI higher. But just because the cords in the carcass of the ST tire will be larger, does not indicate it will handle significantly higher loads or be more durable than the LT tire WITH SIMILAR LOAD RATING. If it did handle significantly higher loads, you would not be comparing two tires with comparable load ratings (for instance, comparing the ST235/80R16LRE to the LT215/85R16LRE is not a valid comparison).

* This post was edited 01/27/12 06:22am by ExRocketScientist *


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jetboat

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Posted: 01/27/12 09:03am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LT commerical T/A'S buy BFGoodrich.My buddy bought 4 "ST" tires,had 3 blowouts on the first trip with them.Said he got them real cheep!then bought 3 additional "ST" tires.I always wish him luck on his trips.

3Fivers51

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Posted: 01/27/12 10:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just remembered this too, The tire dealer also said that the sidewalls in the ST were better than those in the LT and I mentioned this to my friend that has a diesel pusher and he had heard that was correct too. But everything I am getting feed back on seems to lead me to the LT. Don't know what luck I will have at this tire shop convincing them to put the LT's on for me.
Thanks,
Bill

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 01/27/12 12:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3Fivers51 wrote:

I just remembered this too, The tire dealer also said that the sidewalls in the ST were better than those in the LT and I mentioned this to my friend that has a diesel pusher and he had heard that was correct too. But everything I am getting feed back on seems to lead me to the LT. Don't know what luck I will have at this tire shop convincing them to put the LT's on for me.
Thanks,
Bill

If you want a LT tire your going to have to move up to a 16" trailer wheels. There simply isn't any 15" LTs with 2600 lbs of capacity. Many trailers come OEM with 16" LT tires.

Just so you will know ----- "ST tires are designed for as soft a ride as possible so they don't transmit too much shock to the trailer and its contents.
Trailer-tire sidewall stiffness is a compromise between P and LT designs. " This is a direct copy from Carlisle Tire and Rubber technical trailer tire safety website.

In defence of your tire dealer its to his credit he won't mount a lessor capacity tire than your trailers 5200 lb axle requirements.

The LT is the way to go but in your case it needs to have a minimum of 2600 lbs capacity regardless of size and it will have to be in a 16" size which requires 16" wheels.

The LT225/75-16 E has 2680 lbs of capacity but it is .9 taller than your OEM ST tire. You will have to do your own measuring to see if the bigger tire will have the proper clearence or take the trailer to the dealer and let him do the measuring for proper fit.


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Chris

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Posted: 01/27/12 11:13am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lots of miss info about ST sidewalls being posted here. The ST sidewall is stronger than many P or car type tires. It is however not as strong as most LT tires. Go to a tire shop and have them bring out a ST tire and a similar size LT tire. Sit on them, but be careful not to fall when the ST collapses under your weight. At around 34-35Lbs most ST235/80R16E are just a wet noodle.

Chris


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Allworth

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Posted: 01/27/12 11:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It is your money and the tire shop should do what you are willing to pay for.

There is NO (repeat NO) law as to what kind of tires can be mounted on what equipment. Regulations about load capacity, yes, but tire type, no!

I have taken rims off of the trailer and taken them to the tire shop in the back of the truck. They have no way of knowing what I am using them on. Just mount (and balance) the tires!


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mapguy

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Posted: 01/27/12 11:43am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3Fivers51 wrote:

I just remembered this too, The tire dealer also said that the sidewalls in the ST were better than those in the LT and I mentioned this to my friend that has a diesel pusher and he had heard that was correct too. But everything I am getting feed back on seems to lead me to the LT. Don't know what luck I will have at this tire shop convincing them to put the LT's on for me.
Thanks,
Bill


It is kind of a moot point with your size tire isn't it. All that is necesary is to install a tire that meets or exceeds the needs shown by GAWR on your Federal Certificate Decal. Federal Certificate is on front lower left sidewall of trailer.

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