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 > Rough ride

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rvarner

Pahrump, NV, USA

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Joined: 02/27/2001

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Posted: 02/25/12 07:03pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wolfe10 is right on the money. Weigh your coach (4 corners) and check your tire mfg' ratings.
Richard


2002 Itasca Horizon 36LD/2008 Xterra/DEMCO Xcali-bar/Ready Brake
FMCA 394912

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 02/25/12 07:25pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

PLEASE stop speculating on what HIS correct PSI is. His original post says he has a 26K chassis (??GCWR?? or ?GCWR?). Advice on what works on a 30' coach could be close, or WAY off that he needs.

Only weighing all four wheel positions (BEST WAY) and using the heavier wheel position on each axle to determine the MINIMUM PSI for all tires on that axle or (SECOND BEST)axle weights and add a 5 PSI or so fudge factor to account for left/right imbalance to give you the correct MINIMUM PSI will give him the correct PSI for HIS coach.


Brett Wolfe
1997 Safari Sahara 3540
EX: 1993 Foretravel 36' U-240


FMCA Forum: www.community.fmca.com/index

Diesel RV Club:http://www.dieselrvclub.org/

J-Rooster

Port Orchard, Wa. / Lake Havasu City, Az.

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Posted: 02/26/12 01:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wolfe10 wrote:

PLEASE stop speculating on what HIS correct PSI is. His original post says he has a 26K chassis (??GCWR?? or ?GCWR?). Advice on what works on a 30' coach could be close, or WAY off that he needs.

Only weighing all four wheel positions (BEST WAY) and using the heavier wheel position on each axle to determine the MINIMUM PSI for all tires on that axle or (SECOND BEST)axle weights and add a 5 PSI or so fudge factor to account for left/right imbalance to give you the correct MINIMUM PSI will give him the correct PSI for HIS coach.
X-2, I run more PSI in my coach (100 PSI) it rides rougher but the payoff is longer tire wear. And in my case (nobody else's) it has paid off. My Michelins are in there 9th year and look near new and that wouldn't have happened running the 80 lbs. PSI that was suggested by Michelin.

Goldencrazy

madison wi

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Posted: 02/26/12 06:34am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I thought most posters just described what they do with psi. The poster will have to decide based on the charts and his weight analysis. From the posts it is clear that psi is not simple or one size fits all. On the subject of tire life I was under the impression that 7 years is about max as rubber breaks down and most tires are replaced because of age not tread ore sidewall wear.

jadatis

Holland

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Posted: 02/26/12 02:45pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4 Point weighing is the best way to go from when determinating the best tire-pressure. But Asking the tire-maker in America can give to low answers.
Best is to use one of my spreadsheets to make a pressure/load-capacity list. In this you can make a formula that is even more save then the European way of calculating. The formula is explained in the spreadsheet, and the used systems in time are mentioned at the bottom.

All about tire pressure, 2nd from botom xls file
In this map use 2nd from botom file for older Exell.
Download first by clicking on the line, but not on the name of it.
Then in the right barr at Download.
After Download, and eventual virus-check, open it in Excell or compatible programm to use it with the remarks.

I would use the lightest wheel on the axle , and make it 85% of the weigth to calculate the pressure for , bij deviding it with 0,85 ( example weight 850 calculate 850/0,85=1000). Then see if the heaviƫst wheel on that axle stays below 100% , wich it mostly does.
85% is the load% I concluded by reactions, below things begin to bump.
For trailers with no people or animal in it I dare to go as low as 80% .
Calculating with this high reserve is for, misreadings of weight and pressure-scales( even a calibrated schale has its deveations),pressure-loss in time, incidental extra load, loadshifting during the vacation.

If you cant figure it out, give me the details, and I will do it for you.

Greatings from Holland
Peter

kjbkjb

Wisconsin

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Posted: 02/26/12 06:39am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Goldencrazy wrote:

I thought most posters just described what they do with psi. The poster will have to decide based on the charts and his weight analysis. From the posts it is clear that psi is not simple or one size fits all. On the subject of tire life I was under the impression that 7 years is about max as rubber breaks down and most tires are replaced because of age not tread ore sidewall wear.


Right on Goldencrazy. Tire age, not tire wear, is normally the main concern for replacement.

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