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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Swapping to a Deep Transmission pan for my camper Hauler

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Photog101

Garden City, Michigan

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Posted: 02/10/12 01:53pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JoeChiOhki:

I am glad to see that you picked up on the extension of the filter. Mine is an Allison and the deep pan option came with a filter that is extended to the depth of the pan.

By not extending the filter into the deeper pan, could cause a problem, if the trans oil got low, as it would uncover the filter early and you would have major problems quickly.


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1997 Veri Lite RL1200 on a '02, K3500, CC, DRW, 8.1L, Allison, 4.1 gears, Bridgestone 225/70R19.5 tires.


SoCalDesertRider

Arizona desert

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Posted: 02/10/12 06:07pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dave1131 wrote:

A deeper pan is a good idea, but if you are looking to lower transmission temps you might consider changing the engine coolant thermostat to a lower temp one in the warmer months. Being connected, the engine does transfer heat to the transmission.

I use a lower temp one during the summer months and it makes a world of difference in transmission temps.
I use a failsafe 160F degree in the warmer months and see about a 20 degree drop in transmission temps.
a 195F degree (stock in my old truck)in the winter is what i use

Have fun
Dave
You really change your engine's thermostat twice a year?


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ticki2

NH

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Posted: 02/10/12 06:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Photog101 wrote:

JoeChiOhki:

I am glad to see that you picked up on the extension of the filter. Mine is an Allison and the deep pan option came with a filter that is extended to the depth of the pan.

By not extending the filter into the deeper pan, could cause a problem, if the trans oil got low, as it would uncover the filter early and you would have major problems quickly.


If you let the fluid level get below the original pickup height you are going to have MUCH bigger problems to worry about . The purpose of the deep pan is to add volume of fluid and increase surface area for cooling. It is not to be able to run low on fluid . Your Allison holds twice as much fluid as a car but you shouldn't let either one run a quart low.


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arto_wa

SW, WA

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Posted: 02/11/12 12:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think the money would be better spent on AT oil temperature gauge(s), external AT oil filter and larger AT oil cooler - if needed?


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Less Stuff

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Posted: 02/11/12 02:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was thinking of adding a large Aluminum rear differential cover to my truck.

Then I started to think about what would fare better in a run in with a rock.

So my truck still has the stock steel differential cover and I saved a few bucks!!!!

* This post was edited 02/11/12 03:03pm by an administrator/moderator *


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AKsilvereagle

North Pole, Alaska

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Posted: 02/11/12 09:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As far as my 70 Thunderbird goes on the C6 Ford trans, I added an 8 tube trans cooler and removed the AC condensor (the AC didnt work anyway) while my transmission was getting rebuilt on the bench back in 1985, as all my other 8 tube trans coolers for all 4 of my C6 Fords are positioned directly behind the grille as the trans coolers are the first to contact the airflow.

I installed a custom mechanical trans oil temp gauge (100 F - 320 F) on the 70 Thunderbird in 1987 that was a $20 sale item at the time, one of the most economical and well spent accessories I ever encountered.....The threaded sender adapter unit is braised on the side of the C6 pan (which is also my drain plug) and makes it real nice for maintenance tasks.

During the summer months, the temp normally reads 125 F to 130 F (135 F on a 90 F degree day), although I do not know the exact temp coming out of the outlet line.

When I towed a fully loaded trailer or a boat, the trans temp will raise to 135-140 F when the outside temp is 60 F to 80 F.

While I was visiting Palm Springs and Las Vegas in midsummer 1989, the trans temp while operating stayed between 140 F at night, and 150 F during the day with 115 F outside temperature.

The only other time my trans temp gauge reached 150 F was driving on I-5 over Grapevine Pass and Grants Pass close to 100 F outside temps and never seen my gauge read beyond 150 F degrees on the few occasions I mentioned, as my car weighs 5400 lbs.

I do not have a trans oil temp gauge on my camper rig, however the first thing I done when I bought it in 1996 was drain the torq converter and pan, adjusted the intermediate band, install an 8 tube trans cooler, and replenished it with fresh fluid and filter...At 175,000+ original miles I believe I truly extended the life of the trans just in time as the fluid in it was a dark burgundy color and had that silty look, but did not smell burnt at all which was a big plus.

Because of the trans oil temp gauge installed on my 70 Thunderbird C6, I had a good indication of what similar conditions would hold up to with a stock C6 on my camper rig.

Reached the 200,000th original odometer mile reading at (km 59.0) mile 36 Hart Hwy. north of Prince George in BC :




As comparing to some far north roads with unpaved and gravel surfaces, if I were to ever run any aluminum oil pan, I would at least install some form of skid plate or cover to deflect away any potential rocks or debris from striking the aluminum trans pan for piece of mind.

The C6 transmission on my camper rig is still goin strong over 201,000+ odometer miles....once I surpass the 215,152nd odometer mile reading, it would be safe to say for sure the truck officially surpassed 200,000 distance miles - as of my ownership, my odometer shows around a 13.2 ratio per extra mile reading versus road logs and road distance markers.


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AKsilvereagle

North Pole, Alaska

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Posted: 02/12/12 01:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

I use a failsafe 160F degree in the warmer months and see about a 20 degree drop in transmission temps.


I do not know much about the newer designed vehicles persay reference to the aluminum blocks-heads that do tend to run cooler, however I am old school when it comes to vehicles with equipped cast iron engines.

I run a minimum 180 F degree thermostat year round for the main reason of knowing that a minimum water temperature of 171 F will sterilize surfaces, that will reduce the chance of any potential calcium and scaling buildup even more.

I do run distilled water with a 60 percent coolant mix and change it out every two years which of course is the most significant factor to deter any buildup in the block, heads and cooling system.

I tried a 160 degree thermostat in my 70 Thunderbird since I first owned the vehicle in 1984 when the engine always ran warmer on hotter days, to no avail of course as that 160 F thermostat would build up even more pressure versus the other thermostats.

Tried a much lower 7 lb pressure cap, to no avail....installed a custom made 4 core 40 row radiator which helped a little, however the engine still ran warm on hotter days with any temp thermostat, so the 180 degree went back in.

Then I seen this Milodon High Volume water pump advertised as 30 percent more flow even at idle speed, so I installed it on the 429 - ALL my running warm problems were eliminated for good with this water pump, so in addition I also have a high volume water pump installed on both my Lincoln 460's, including my 390 camper rig that got one installed the following month after I purchased the truck....all my Big Block Ford engines stay stable water temperature wise and never run warm or hot, which I also tend to think it reflects on the transmission's life too.

AKsilvereagle

North Pole, Alaska

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Posted: 02/12/12 01:29am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

You really change your engine's thermostat twice a year


You betcha - it is a way of life in the far north.....I install a 205 F degree thermostat during the winter months here in Interior Alaska for my subzero rig (I only drive it during -20 below and colder days), your engine needs to hold significant heat and sustain normal operating temperature during the colder months or bad things will happen. When the temp is past -35 F below, I install a piece of cardboard in front of the radiator core to keep the engine from losing more heat.

I reinstall the 180 F thermostat within mid to late March once I am ensured the potential -20 F temps are gone for good and drive it during the summer until late October arrives or the first -20 F below temperature arriving.


If you were to say keep a 160 F degree thermostat in your engine in the much colder outdoor temperatures, you will overcool the engine and eventually suffer damage, it is just as bad as overheating the engine.


For my other winter rig which is my 1970 Dodge Truck, I do not drive that rig past -15 F below as the NP435 trans shaft will keep the 225 slant 6 engine from cranking normally due to it being too cold to rotate parked outside in that temperature, despite engaging the clutch pedal while starting as the truck is pretty much all steel...besides that, the heater wont keep the cab warm enough when it is past -25 F below.

Yes, quite a change from me being a natural born and native Southern Californian to goin on 30 years now in the arctic region.

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