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 > What would be a good restoration project?

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Winnipeg

Los Angeles

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Posted: 02/10/12 12:16am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am thinking about looking for an older diesel pusher to restore and wonder what would be a good candidate to look for. Here are some basics on what I am looking for:

1) I would expect to redo or replace the furniture, flooring, and appliances. Kitchen counter & cabinet doors too?

2) The TV's, stereos, and cameras would have to be replaced. I like high-tech, so replacing these items is a given.

3) Electrical and plumbing systems should be salvageable unless it has been abused. I don't want something that has been messed up.

4) Chassis & engine. This is where I want a solid starting point. I am OK with bringing maintenance items up to date, but I don't want issues. And, I don't want an under-powered rig. I need to pull toys up mountains, so small block engines will not satisfy.

5) Slides & Layout. This is a challenge. My wife is determined that anything without slides is unacceptable. I suspect, however, that there are layouts without slides that work well.

6) Resale. Who knows when plans will change and the toys need to go. I would rather put money into a Bluebird or Prevost than a Gulfstream.

Well, those are the things I can think of at this point. Any suggestions of what to look for or what to watch out for?

Paul

Old-Biscuit

Verde Valley

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Posted: 02/10/12 12:32am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

From another post about 5 days ago......
Hurry time running out

Would require a complete rebuild BUT way kool when done

Gale Hawkins

Murray, KY

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Posted: 02/10/12 12:47am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WOW!

gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 02/10/12 04:36am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Old-Biscuit wrote:

From another post about 5 days ago......
Hurry time running out

Would require a complete rebuild BUT way kool when done

It's a 4 cylinder, probably not the pulling power the OP wants.

bsinmich

Holland, MI

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Posted: 02/10/12 04:49am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are looking for an older Bluebird or Prevost you won't find slides since they didn't build them until recently.


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Dale.Traveling

Newport News, VA

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Posted: 02/10/12 04:55am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here's a Blue Bird that a local dealer has had for a very long time. Looks pretty solid overall but a ruff diamond at the moment. I suspect it used to be a bus then became a rolling office or something. The cabinets currently installed would look nice in any garage.

I would give serious consideration to a mid to late 80's Foretravel such as this one at PPL as an example of what you want the finish product to look like.


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rgatijnet1

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Posted: 02/10/12 06:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A lot depends on your abilities, the space you have, and the equipment you have. If you have to outsource work, engine/transmission repair, and welding or painting, the costs can get out of hand quickly.
You mention resale value and if that it your intent, unless you can do 100% of the work yourself, forget it. If you have to outsource work, you will never be able to recoup what you pay to do a restoration. Then all you need to figure is how much you can stand to lose on the project.
I think the best bet for you would be to look for something that YOU would want to own, and use, if it was perfect. That way you would be working towards your own dream coach, and not be focused on whether you could sell it or not.
Having restored many different types of vehicles, I can tell you now that it will take more time, cost more money, and take up more space then you can ever imagine. Just be prepared so that you don't have to stop half way through the project. If you don't complete it, the resale value of any vehicle is next to nothing.

Winnipeg

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Posted: 02/10/12 09:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That old chevy looks pretty cool, it even has a fold down bed. I am surprised that the seller didn't post any details about its heritage. Quite a project for someone.

The Bluebird looks like an old Red Cross bloodwagon. It would have to be completely gutted and need everything. Not much to work with there other than a pretty ugly chassis. I am not too keen about having that big old diesel engine as an arm rest either.

As for resale value, I am very familiar with the negative investment quality. However, plans do sometimes change or new oportunities arise. If it does need to be unloaded, it should be something that makes sense to someone else too.

sunkatcher

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Posted: 02/10/12 10:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rgatijnet1 wrote:

A lot depends on your abilities, the space you have, and the equipment you have. If you have to outsource work, engine/transmission repair, and welding or painting, the costs can get out of hand quickly.
You mention resale value and if that it your intent, unless you can do 100% of the work yourself, forget it. If you have to outsource work, you will never be able to recoup what you pay to do a restoration. Then all you need to figure is how much you can stand to lose on the project.
I think the best bet for you would be to look for something that YOU would want to own, and use, if it was perfect. That way you would be working towards your own dream coach, and not be focused on whether you could sell it or not.
Having restored many different types of vehicles, I can tell you now that it will take more time, cost more money, and take up more space then you can ever imagine. Just be prepared so that you don't have to stop half way through the project. If you don't complete it, the resale value of any vehicle is next to nothing.


Ron, you have said it all. I would like to add, I thought I would build a Bus Conversion and managed to get it done a few years back. It took me 2.5 years of pretty steady work and it was not finished when we went on the road. The fact is it would NEVER be finished. There is ALWAYS that other stuff that still needs to be finished.
Most of us are OVER-Builders. We whine and complain about the CHEAP way or motor homes are put together but the fact is OVER-building causes weight issues. When I had finished my MCI-9 it weighed in at over 22 ton and still needed more work. I built in some very neat personal items in the coach and did ALL the work myself including raising the roof 14”, re-skinning the outside, painting the coach, rebuilding the Detroit Diesel and the list is endless. In the end it was worth next to nothing. It had no NADA book value so no one could get a loan to purchase it. No one with any real cash had an interest in buying a used HOME built motorhome and so it was only a VERY expensive hobby with absolutely NO return on investment.
When I finally got rid of it I purchased a used Bounder that was in great shape, needed nothing to be ready to use and the wiffey didn’t have a LIST.
My 2 cents worth. If you want a hobby that will drain you of every moment of spare time you have. Drain your bank account at every opportunity and have you asking your wife for more patients than she has ever demonstrated. Go for it
Another Ron


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deandec

Northern CA

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Posted: 02/10/12 10:27am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would select:

Bluebird, Foretravel, Country Coach Magna or Affinity, American Eagle, HR Navigator, Monaco Signature,

Except that most of those listed above needing restoration would probably not have slides. Many of the above would not need much more than fresh floor coverings and fresh upholstery along with current AV update.

JMHO


Dean
95 CC Magna, Jeep GC


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