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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > East coast trip

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jim1632

Arlington, VA

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Posted: 02/12/12 01:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

East Coast is a big first trip due to the congestion in this part of the country. I always breathe easier when I cross the Mississippi River going west.

Your basic choice is to follow the US-1/I-95 corridor. US-1 runs from the Canadian border in northern Maine all the way to Key West. It is one of the earliest highways in the old US highway system of the 1920s so it runs through the center of every city along the east coast. I-95 more or less parallels the original route without going into the urban areas as much.

Due to the road system and the congestion, I would not call this an RV-friendly excursion. It is on my to-do-someday list, though.

Good luck on the planning and the actual trip. Ask us more specific questions after you have decided on the general routes.

dlbapm

Escondido, CA, USA

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Posted: 02/12/12 01:43pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think that the suggestion to "start south of Washington DC" for your first trip is great. I have driven the east coast from FL to New Brunswick several times. South of Washington the driving is easy. North of Washington it is congested and I really did't feel comfortable in the motor home and towing my Jeep.

I have also driven from Interlochen, MI to Washington, DC several times to see family. An easy and scenic drive, particularly in the fall. The motor home always gets stored in Gettysburg, PA and the Jeep takes us into Washington.

Doug

ninabika

Michigan

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Posted: 02/12/12 04:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you demoon! Love that you passed on suggestions to make it work! Yes, we are hoping to go through Niagara, finish off our swimming in all the Great Lakes and maybe hit Cooperstown on our way to Maine. So would you skip Boston area?

demoon

MA

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Posted: 02/12/12 02:52pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello, from the Northeast. There is no reason to go near any areas that are as busy as metro Detroit. Think Maine, NH, VT, Western MA and CT, around NYC and take the Delmarva Peninsula - side trip to Colonial Williamsburg, back to Virginia b\Beach and then the Outer Banks of NC. You are now by the "congested areas". There are tons of things to see both historical and ocean and still stay away from that congestion. We spent a month in Michigan last fall and I had no desire to drive though Detroit, or Cleveland on the way home and we did't. The great part about an RV is that you can go where you want at your pace. We loved Michigan and the suggestion of Mill Creek is a great one. You might want to think about making your trip east by going through Canada to Buffalo and on to Maine. That is an easy trip and you can do highways or byways as you see fit. If you are going September to December you should start your east coast journey in ME and head south. It starts to get cold and campgrounds start closing in the north as you get into mid October. Have a great time and relax, it will be fun.

HHfundays

PA

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Posted: 02/12/12 07:00pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you do it stop by asateague island on the Maryland side for the wild horses. It was a ton of fun with 2 great visitor centers one on the Maryland side and one on the Virginia side. We love seeing the country in our rv. We had no rv experience when we first started, however, dh drives firetrucks. We have rved so much and love it. Happy trails!





demoon

MA

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Posted: 02/12/12 10:00pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ninabika wrote:

Thank you demoon! Love that you passed on suggestions to make it work! Yes, we are hoping to go through Niagara, finish off our swimming in all the Great Lakes and maybe hit Cooperstown on our way to Maine. So would you skip Boston area?


Boston is full of history. The problem is that dreaded congestion issue. There are a couple of campgrounds not to far away and I think it might be possible to take a commuter train into the city from close to one of them. I would not think about taking the RV into the city - if for no other reason than the parking issue. We enjoy Boston Minuteman Campgroundhttp://minutemancampground.com/, The folks that run the place are great and if you give them a call I am sure they could give you info on getting into the city. The other nice thing about the park is that it a stone's throw off your route to Maine.

Another great historical stop is Old Sturbridge Village in Sturbridge, MA. http://www.osv.org/ This right on the way if you decide to go central NY, central MA to get to Maine.
Be glad to share more thoughts with you. Especially specific questions. We have traveled pretty much all of the Northeast.

mgirardo

Brunswick, GA

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Posted: 02/13/12 09:13am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Since this is a Histroy and Ocean trip, I would not skip the Northeast just because of congestion. However, you need to be comfortable driving the motorhome in traffic, lots of it, before hitting the Northeast US. Northern VA, DC & Baltimore, MD, Northern NJ, NY City, most of Southern CT and Boston is some terrible traffic. Philadelphia is bad too and you don't want to miss Philadelphia, Ghettysburg and Valley Forge for history.

My trip would begin in Maine and head south. By October, most of the Northeast will be on the cooler side. The Outer Banks in October is nice as long as they are Hurricane free. From there south, October and usually November are nice on Southeastern US beaches. Finish off your stay in and around St. Augustine, FL or even Miami if you want to go that far south. In December it will still be fairly warm.

You definitely want to research your stops and make sure that the area is RV friendly. I would avoid Northeast Cities with the Motorhome. Camp outside the cities and venture in either with a shuttle, mass transit or a rental car. With 6 people you'll need a big rental car and that could get expensive.

Most tunnels in the Northeast and Maryland allow propane if they are part of the vehicle. So a Motorhome is fine if the tank is permanently mounted, a trailer with portable tanks is not. Towing a trailer through the northeast is expensive because you will get slammed at toll booths (for instance in MD, the I95 toll is $6 for 2 axle vehicle, $20 for 4 axle vehicle. If you have a motorhome, every state is different with tolls. NJ & PA tolls consider a 2 axle motorhome a Class II vehicle and are a little more expensive than a car, while MD & DE don't charge extra for a 2 axle motorhome. However, Philadelphia bridges will charge you a lot more. I don't know about NY bridges with a Motorhome, but I'm sure they are expensive since they are expensive for cars.

As for Motorhomes, a bunk house would sleep 6 nicely. We have a Jayco Greyhawk 31FS with 2 slides and 2 bunks on the bedroom slide. Queen bed in back, 2 single bunks, the dinette folded as a bed, sofa folded as a bed and king bed above cab means we can sleep a small boy/girl scout troop with ease. We can sleep 8 with no problem.

The down side of a bunk house Motorhome is that your gas mileage will stink, we average 7.5 mpg highway, 4.5 mpg city. Motorhomes with bunk houses are usually long, ours is 32' 2" long, which means street parking is not possible except on deserted streets and even small parking lots can be tough if they are crowded.

I agree with previous posters about taking the motorhome out locally a few times before heading out on a 4 month trip. Your first trip you will probably be so excited, you won't realize what you need and don't need, by the 2nd and 3rd trip you begin to recognize your needs more.

-Michael


Michael Girardo :: michael@ecxc.com
2009 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS Class C Motorhome
2006 Rockwood Roo 233 Hybrid Travel Trailer
Four Green Feet

NHclassC

NH

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Posted: 02/13/12 10:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have done the trip from Southern NH to Florida twice in a Class C. Other than congestion of traffic it isn't too bad. Once you get below DC it opens up nice and not so much traffic. We did it in two and a half days (Disney was the destination). First time was My wife and I and four girls. That in itself was more trying than the drive lol.
Jim


2009 Wildcat 28RKBS
2008 Chevy 3500 Duramax/Allison


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