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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > extreme weather rated truck camper ? which is /was best

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Capt. Caper

Northern N.H>

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Posted: 02/16/12 05:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Artic Fox is supposed to have 2 in of insulation in the walls but who knows where or if it lacks in certain other areas. My new Lance is 4 season (only 1 1/2 in I believe in the walls) certified with duel panes,heated basement,duel furnace but I think if it's cold enough and long enough no truck camper will survice a wet camping expierence. So it depends on what your going to do.
I would get the one you like and then worry about the cold camping. Any camper can be used in a dry camp mode. Lot's of posts here by some who have taken it to extremes like stuffing the sides between the camper and truck bed walls with insulation.


2011 F350 Super Duty,SRW, 6.7 PowerStroke,Crew Cab,Lariet,4x4, 3.55 Locking Diff ,Short Box.Timbrens,Happy Jack's, Gator Guard bed liner, Penda bed mat.
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54suds

adk mts.

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Posted: 02/16/12 05:29am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Camper_Jeff_&_Kelli wrote:

Did anyone mention CITATION TC with the 2" Polar Package?
I looked at one of those and it seemed like the best all weather TC with all the cold weather work they did to it. Heated tanks and all.



If you look at the spec sheets that was one of the very top tc's of its time (2007)unfortunatly they droped out of the tc market after only mfg a small number at that standard.


2015 GMC crew cab,drw,4x4/ torque lift tdn's 36" ext
1988? & 1999 Bigfoot 3000 series / 2012 Chalet Ascent s100+
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silversand

Montreal

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Posted: 02/16/12 05:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

...is only one inch thick bead board and shows condensation stains...


Bead-board, or MEPS (molded and then expanded pentane-containing bead polystyrene) average density is 1 LB per cubic foot. However(!), there are numerous densities available in MEPS sheeting and various bead chemistries that give R values from R-3.8 to just under R5 (R 4.4) per inch of thickness. Obviously, price is a substantial determinant for R value (or, greater density). The compressive strength, and water absorption around the beads and its use as a structural component in a compound wall isn't comparable to the next type of foam board: XEPS.

XEPS (extruded expanded polystyrene) too is made of beads (or, pellets) however(!), those pellets are dissolved in chemicals, then the sheet product is extruded (rather than blown and molded). The production process introduced tiny bubbles, or foaming agent, in the XEPS, then the sheets are die-cut into size. The huge difference between MEPS and XEPS are the following: XEPS is far more uniform in density, rendering a much more uniform R value over the entire sheet; the density alone in XEPS sheeting is far and away higher than MEPS, at 1.5 LBS per cubic foot (this gives a far higher R value per inch {at a minimum, R-5} above that of MEPS's R-3.8 bead-board, AND, has a much, much higher compressive strength, AND, has a substantial advantage over MEPS in vapor transmission THROUGH the sheet foam itself, rendering it effectively a vapor barrier: if any moisture infiltrates into/around the beads in bead-board (and it does!), your R value will drop substantially {like to R2 or less}). Also, MEPS (unless it is a very expensive specifically structurally designed bead-board) is not used as a structural component in a compound wall, roof or structural system, where XEPS is specifically used (and designed) to be used as a structural component in a compound wall/roof system because of it's superior deflective and compressive properties.

There are a lot of trade reading materials (chemistry and processes) out there describing both products, and their strengths and weaknesses for myriad uses. And, knowing just what MEPS or XEPS your particular camper manufacturer is using and how the compound structure is manufactured (glue type, compression/bonding specifications, curing, relative humidity in the process, cure room temperatures, etc, etc, etc, etc, etc) can be difficult to find out (this is a tightly guarded trade secret).


Silver
2004 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 4x4 6.0L Ext/LB Tow Package 4L80E Michelin AT2s| Outfitter Caribou

covered wagon

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Posted: 02/16/12 06:46am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting point about the bead board type loosing some of it's already lower R value because of moisture absorbtion. I think this is a contributing factor to some delamination problems, becoming 'unglued so to speak'. The bead board is glued to the body with contact cement. The same thing used on laminate counter tops. Only the newer water based cement is not as strong as the older toleulene (sp.) type. Lower R value from condensation absorbtion can add even more hydrolic pressure between the body and insulation. Sort of like a dry 2x4 sitting under a truck tire, capable of lifting up the truck after it gets wet and swells in size from moisture.

Thanks Silver for the great info on the different types of rigid insulation.

* This post was edited 02/16/12 07:24am by covered wagon *

Less Stuff

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Posted: 02/16/12 09:07am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our winter package equipped 2004 915 Lance Lite has spent some time in below Zero weather.
Our windows are only single pane so inside moisture will freeze.
We have the Lance insulated covers for all roof vents. Even the bathroom skylight has it's insulated cover.
We also put Reflectix insulation over the windows.
The furnace runs a lot in very cold weather.
The plumbing systems have never frozen. But we do run the camper furnace when driving the truck at those temps.
Our camper is not a basement model yet the waste tanks have ducted warm air from the furnace.
Comfort in the camper was good.

Comfort for this old fart in cold weather is less than good. So winter now finds the camper in storage or someplace warm.


DG
Former user name: "Lots of Stuff"
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silversand

Montreal

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Posted: 02/16/12 09:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Covered Wagon wrote:

Thanks Silver for the great info on the different types of rigid insulation.


....my pleasure

I have very close relatives in "the polystyrene industry" and consulted with them before buying our XEPS composite walled camper.

dakonthemountain

Crestline, California

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Posted: 02/16/12 10:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Once I get the front window leak fixed I'll be looking into "add on" dual pane windows for winter camping. Though I'm not the diehard snow bunny camper some of you are, I do like the desert in the winter and it sure blows a cold wind sometimes! I had no problems with 27 degrees last weekend, but did have the condensation on the windows a bit from the furnace and two big guys shoring all night! But I also didn't crack a vent to allow the moisture to escape because the wind was so strong coming at the opening I was worried about it tearing the plastic vent off the roof. I'm going to be putting MaxAire covers on the bath vent and over the bed after I install a Fantastic Fan so then I'll be able to. My little Weekender is a well built unit in many regards and other than adding a little insulation to the access door areas everything/place else is already done, with ducted heat too. Extreme winter camping?... not so much I would think, but more because I don't want to be there in the first place if it's under 0 degrees outside!

Dak


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cleary

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Posted: 02/16/12 10:41am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

woodhog wrote:

cleary wrote:

Hey Joe,

Both our factory stock 1988 and 2001 Bigfoot campers worked fine up here at temps. well below zero F. Our current 2008 Okanagan does as well, however, it was customized by the factory for use here at 65 degrees north.

Chuck



It would be interesting to know what the factory did to the camper compared to one of their ordinary units????

Thanks


The things I know they did was to add a layer of insulation under the camper to keep the basement from freezing from the bottom up as our old Okanagan 116 did. They added extra furnace ducting to the basement and to the cab over sleeping area. I think they also put vent holes in some of the partitions in the basement so the heat could circulate better down there. That was part of the freezing problem in our 116. Beyond that, I don't know.

Chuck


2006 F-350, 4X4, Crew Cab, V-10, Torqshift, Dually. 2008 Okanagan 106UDB. Both 4-wheelers and snowmobiles. KL7AY Our website

54suds

adk mts.

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Posted: 02/16/12 12:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

silversand wrote:

Covered Wagon wrote:

Thanks Silver for the great info on the different types of rigid insulation.


....my pleasure

I have very close relatives in "the polystyrene industry" and consulted with them before buying our XEPS composite walled camper.



if you look deeper , there are huge differences in the insulation & moisture and strength and r values of open cell / closed cell /extruded /blown or injected foams which are made mostly of either ,polystyrene or polyurethane and each of these can have a great difference in r values & moisture resistance , thickness alone is not proof of high insulation rating


a great short general information site on foam insulations link

* This post was last edited 02/16/12 02:43pm by 54suds *   View edit history

mastercraft1995

Salem, Or

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Posted: 02/16/12 05:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We use to have a 1995 Lance 880 that we dry camped in every weekend on the mountain so we could snow ski. I covered the windows with cheap plastic stuff you get at Walmart and covered 2 of the vents with insulation put 1 inch think pink insulation boards under the cab over bed and put insulation in between the wheel wells and camper.

The coldest it ever got to was -10 with 40 or so mph wind Presidents day a few years ago. We never had any issues at all. We ran a generator a few hours a day while we ate breakfast and dinner.


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