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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > How fast do you drive on highways in your class C?

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JT

out west

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Joined: 06/14/2002

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Posted: 02/17/12 08:23am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree that mileage suffers at higher speeds, but I'm a little surprised that not one post in four pages (except the person who mentioned not following too closely;smart move!) has mentioned the "control and stop" factors of a heavy vehicle at high speeds. My max is 60 on freeways, always in the right lane, and then only if there is light traffic and the right lane surface isn't beating the peewaddin out of the rig. (The "rule", not the "exception", in CA.)

I've seen plenty of RVs of all types and sizes blow by me at high speeds; they don't seem to grasp that a *heavy vehicle* - the gvwr of the E450 chassis is 14050 to 14500, and I suspect that many, if not most, are pretty close to that when down the road - takes a lot more time and distance to stop than a passenger car. And, depending on the design, balance, and weight distribution of the rig, a panic maneuver may well make that heavy -and often top-heavy with a long rear overhang- vehicle *very difficult* to control.

What's the hurry?

CamperKirk

Bay Village

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Posted: 02/17/12 08:31am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have the E450 with the big ol V10 and keep her about 60-65. Getting 8-9 mpg which isnt bad. I do stay in the far right lane. I also am not real big on the idea of moving over for cars entering the highway. I normally will but not as much when driving the RV. First off, people entering the highway have the yeild sign. I think people forget this. I had a "person" about stop in front of me on the highway to let someone on....... Anyhow, the biggest reason I dont like to move over in the RV is that people will hang you out to dry in the left lane. They are in such a hurry to get around you, they start passing on the righ and wont give you a chance to move back to the right! Drives me crazy! So, I only move over for semi trucks. They are bigger

NewsW

US

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Posted: 02/17/12 08:35am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JT wrote:


I've seen plenty of RVs of all types and sizes blow by me at high speeds; they don't seem to grasp that a *heavy vehicle* - the gvwr of the E450 chassis is 14050 to 14500, and I suspect that many, if not most, are pretty close to that when down the road - takes a lot more time and distance to stop than a passenger car. And, depending on the design, balance, and weight distribution of the rig, a panic maneuver may well make that heavy -and often top-heavy with a long rear overhang- vehicle *very difficult* to control.

What's the hurry?




You forgot to mention the occasional driver who is not a professional, one getting on in years (like over 60), marginal eyesight, etc.

Think you are greatly underestimating the overloading issue.

"getting close to" legal weight is one thing... but what about unbalanced loading (too much on one wheel... not just axle)?

Or out and out overloading?

Many of the RVs that are more than 10 years old (or whenever RVIA got its act together) basically were buit to GVWR with a full tank of gas and a full tank of water and propane... before adding the weight of passengers and luggage and cargo?

How many RVs have you passed where the evidence of overloading is so self evident that it is insane?

Remember the Toyota chassis fiasco where so many people overloaded them that they ended up having to replace the fleet's rear axles?

Then there are the issues at speed.

What about crosswinds on a very high profile vehicle?

Unbalanced design that puts a large amount of weight high up or on one side / rear?

People buy RV think they are like a semi trailer --- built to run all day at 80mph.

Most RVs are tough to drive at much past 65mph --- when loaded to GVWR.

I like driving fast (at limit and a nudge) so I end up with a GVW GCW that is as much as 30% below the factory spec --- and have great handling, braking as long as the load is well distributed.

But then... I built my own rig!

JT

out west

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Posted: 02/17/12 11:29am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Think you are greatly underestimating the overloading issue."
---
Hardly; I am very aware of the overloaded conditions of far too many class C RVs on the road, and the resultant handling, maneuvering, and control problems that can result, and thought my post made the concern quite clear.

navegator

San Diego CA.

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Posted: 02/17/12 01:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We are retired, so no hurry, we also pull, a Suzuky Grand Vitatra behind a 22Ft class C, Coachmen Catalina Sport.
Double lane higways 55 Mph
Two lane 45-55 Mph
Country lane 30-45 Mph
City 25-35
To many idiots in fast cars.
Always slow down for rain, or construction zones.
Navegator

W4MBG

Williamsburg, VA

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Posted: 02/17/12 07:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

i run 55 to 65, depending on the traffic.




1999 Winnebago Minnie, 29', Triton V10, mostly stock. So far...


shermanyoung34

Utah

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Posted: 02/18/12 09:03am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree with the prior comments concerning safety, control, mileage, and comfort. The Duramax in my Seneca seems to have a sweet spot about 60-62. I sounds quieter there, still allows me to cover ground, and I think I have pretty good control in case I have to stop, avoid someone, or get hit with a crosswind. The Duramax has plenty of power and seems to easily exceed 75 mph if I let it. I think however, that the chasis, brakes, etc. are just about at their limits. I don't think it is safe to travel much faster, especially if you are towing anything heavy as I sometimes do.

oldtrucker63

Harlan Kentucky

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Posted: 02/18/12 12:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fredandkathy wrote:

I travel the speed limit, no matter what it is. I feel that slow moving vehicles are a hazard to others traveling the speed limit.
It is really the one's going 85 and 90 .It really is not safe doing the speed limit, Here in Kentucky on I 75 the speed has been move up to 70 mph, Now most cars are going 80 plus, So now at 65 it really is a Danger zone.


Without Trucks,....America Stop's

pnichols

Santa Cruz Mountains

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Posted: 02/18/12 04:12pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

I travel the speed limit, no matter what it is. I feel that slow moving vehicles are a hazard to others traveling the speed limit.


So what is the speed limit for - a sedan or an RV? They can't both be the same ... if they are, you gotta' be crazy driving an RV the speed limit or you gotta' have a lot of patience driving a sedan the speed limit.

I suspect that the speed limits are meant more for sedans.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

noe-place

Somerset, Kentucky

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Posted: 02/18/12 06:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On major highways there is a posted limit for trucks and one for other vehicles. I keep it around 60-65 and downhill I let her go...with the help of gravity you don't have to accelerate much to get a good run downhill. This helps a lot when travelling down one mountainside and up another. Getting a bit of a run uphill always helps.

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