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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > Cabover leak with photos

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crawford

Dandridge Tenn.

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Posted: 02/16/12 07:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are 3 areas to check the seem which the fiberglass meet with the rubber roof. Mine was leaking there, 2 around the running light on cab,3 Slide windows if those have glass which slide check weep holes if rubber isn't around the weeper it will let outside rain between frame and fiberglass allowing water to weep inside. Good luck it took me at less a few hours to fine mine. Two fix this you need to pull outside frame clean and reseal butane tape.





Holiday27

Gresham, OR.

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Posted: 02/16/12 08:10pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My '94 Jamee had a bad leak in the cab over. I drained 1/2 gallon of water from a screw I took out of the banding. I don't think it had ever been re-caulked or taped before I did it. I took the banding off and fixed the de-lam best I could. Replaced the banding with tape and used stainless screws. Then re-caulked everything. One of my main visible leaks was in the front cab over window. You could see the water run in through the seal when it would rain hard. I caulked around the window really good and that seemed to fix it. I also caulked around running lights and re-sealed the lights and roof. Nothing is more maddening than leaks in an RV!

My good friend who is a carpenter and my brother-in law both have had leaks in there RV's. Friends was in his cab over. He had to completely re-build his. He added extra flexible trim on both sides of the banding and gutters everywhere he could (over all windows). I think it was a great idea and gives double protection. Hope this helps.


2002 27PBS Holiday Rambler (Aluminum sided/roof) Love it!

Previous RV's
'94 Jamboree 22ft. (This beast had a 460 with tons of power)
'95 VW Eurovan camper (5 cyl. dog) Pulled a 3 rail fine though.
Tent
Borrowed folks '84 VW Westphalia (water cooled)


mikeleblanc413

Texas

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Posted: 02/17/12 08:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

UPDATE: Now 6 photos...have just added 4 exterior photos showing the leak area.

Your input is always appreciated.



Mike LeBlanc
Retired Photographer, Art Educator
Travel with "Baby Girl" (Catahoula Mix)
Texas


NewsW

US

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Posted: 02/17/12 08:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Have you considered the water source being INSIDE the vehicle?

Describe to me the temperatures you camp in, whether you cook, etc inside.

mikeleblanc413

Texas

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Posted: 02/17/12 08:46am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NewsW wrote:

Have you considered the water source being INSIDE the vehicle?

Describe to me the temperatures you camp in, whether you cook, etc inside.


Thanks for the question. This is happening with the unit parked in our driveway. Since purchased in December, we have used it for only one night...and we didn't cook in it. When I checked it this morning, the area where the floor meets the sidewall is dry...we're supposed to have rain today.

Keep in touch.

TURBODOG1000

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Posted: 02/17/12 09:06am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Type in Sealtech in youtube for a video of a pressure test.

* This post was edited 02/17/12 09:22am by TURBODOG1000 *


2005 F150 XLT Supercab LB Heavy Payload 5.4, 4.10
2007 Jayco Jayflight 31BHDS
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NewsW

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Posted: 02/17/12 09:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mikeleblanc413 wrote:

NewsW wrote:

Have you considered the water source being INSIDE the vehicle?

Describe to me the temperatures you camp in, whether you cook, etc inside.


Thanks for the question. This is happening with the unit parked in our driveway. Since purchased in December, we have used it for only one night...and we didn't cook in it. When I checked it this morning, the area where the floor meets the sidewall is dry...we're supposed to have rain today.

Keep in touch.



The moisture could have been there for quite some time from the previous owner.

Cooking, showers, living in it all add lots of moisture to the air.

The moisture condenses in a cold place.


It is possible that there is a current water source inside the vehicle.

If your water tank is filled, holding tanks, etc. all vent moisture inside via many pathways.

There is also plenty of moisture in the air --- as evident by the black mold growing on the outside of the unit.


For example, condensation would happen at the coldest spot --- normally the windows, every night when the ambient temperature outside cools, yet your vehicle inside contains damp, hot air.

Looking at the pics of the cab, there appear to be little or no insulation beside the carpet.

It is possible that entire cab area is uninsulated, and condensed moisture from the inside cabover walls is seeping down into the wood at the bottom of the cab.

Once it gets there, the moisture is trapped and do not go back into the air (dry) when the vehicle warms up during day.

If this theory is right, you will not find a "leak" per se, because the moisture is in the air.

Alternative sources --- water pressured in as you drive in the rain.

Or, straight forward water leak in from the top.


Most RVs I know of are not built with significant insulation or vapor barriers.

When I built mine, after much study, I placed vapor barriers on both sides of the insulation.

The best decision I ever made for my RV.


If I were you, and this theory pans out...

You need to have your vehicle dried out, rotted wood replaced, and then properly sealed with vapor barriers, insulation, and other stuff that the maker could not bother to put in.

Rather common in all but high end RVs.

magnusfide

On the Road Again and Again and Again...

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Posted: 02/17/12 09:26am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Feel for you, Mike. That's an aggravation to the tenth power.


First law of science: don't spit into the wind.
Keep on rollin'!
Magnus




mikeleblanc413

Texas

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Posted: 02/17/12 09:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

magnusfide wrote:

Feel for you, Mike. That's an aggravation to the tenth power.


I've received so much good input from this forum...IMAGINE if you can how it would be if we didn't have this valuable source that can be tapped into 24/7?

AND..it's FREE!!! All you have to do is ASK!!!

NewsW

US

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Posted: 02/17/12 09:39am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Once you have the source of water identified --

A) from outside, draining in (regular roof leak)

B) outside pressured in (e.g. while driving)

C) inside (condensation)

------------

You need a source of dry, artificial heat because you are in the damp, muggy part of the country to dry this out.

Try a electric heater.

Plus a dehumidifier.

Put both inside.

Then run both for about a week with the windows and doors closed until the exposed surfaces are dry.


The bad news:

If you start rooting around, you are likely to find other spots that are similarly water damaged.

If it is interior water, start check around shower, bath, toilet... and anywhere where the interior is cold to the touch when it is cold outside.

That is where moisture is condensing.

Follow the water to see where condensed water falls / drops to --- there is your water damaged areas.

If I were to guess, it is in the shower area and many others.


The bane of building a motorhome that is hardly any better than a tar paper shack.

Not properly insulated, moisture not properly controlled.

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