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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > transporting a propane cyclinder

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ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Posted: 02/21/12 11:25am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The newer tanks have a float inside that stops the propane filler from getting the tank more than 80% full. There was a reason for that. How many people have a gas grill at home but not a pickup truck? That's right . . . more than have a pickup truck. With the old style tanks without the overfill prevention device, it was not uncommon to get propane coming out of the overflow while taking the filled tank home.

That said, I won't go any further with regards to the efficacy of transporting the thing in other than a "bottomless" outside compartment like my fiver has.

The suggestion of installing a tap in the MH supply is a good one. Just keep in mind there are high pressure appliances and low pressure appliances. The ones that screw onto the 1 pound disposable bottles are high pressure appliances. As such, a tap in your motorhome will have to be between the tank and the regulator. While there are over the counter devices for those of us with pups, TTs, and fivers, I'm not sure if they work on that permanently installed tank in the MH. You may wish to have an out and out propane supplier (those folks who actually deliver propane to homes and businesses in a big tanker truck) take a look at your system and install an appropriate setup for you.

The amount that these small high pressure appliances is very small. I would not worry any more about running out of hot water, heat, refridgeration or propane for the stove than you do now.


ERS

bukhrn

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Posted: 02/21/12 11:49am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

harley-dave wrote:

F-TROUP wrote:

Why don't you tap into your propane line on you class c and do a quick connect valve and hose setup????????


I looked at that but the Wife nixed it.. She's a little paranoid about having gas for the hot water, refer, and furnace.

Dave
Whats to be paranoid about, if you have electric hookup, just run the water heater & fridge on electric. We have the Extend-A-Flow, works great, don't have to worry about carrying extra tanks, & have never run out of gas yet.


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Dashonthedash

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Posted: 02/21/12 12:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another vote for tapping the propane tank; it doesn't use that much propane to run the grill. I used one for years with my old MH. I haven't put one on my new one for one reason: the propane tank is on the "wrong" side.


Gary Shapiro
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JoeChiOhki

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Posted: 02/21/12 04:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The venting is about the only thing I'd worry about, and usually, they don't vent unless they're subject to a fair amount of heat to raise the internal pressure to trip the bleed off.

For a short trip, I don't fret about it too much (From filling station to home). For a long trip, in the past I carried it on the front cargo rack on its side. Have gotten home tipped it up right, let it sit for about 5 minutes then used it, no liquid fuel in the last 10 years.


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Don & Linda

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Posted: 02/21/12 04:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

F-TROUP wrote:

Why don't you tap into your propane line on you class c and do a quick connect valve and hose setup????????


X5

We installed a LP tap and use the extend-a-stay kit.
Your wife shouldn't worry unless you intend to boondock for a very long time.
Most grilles use little. Show her the weight of that little bottle that lasts for multiple grille sessions and then inform her of the weight in your main tank.
I believe propane weigh’s about 4.2 lbs per gallon.


Sorry if this post seems long, I lacked the time to make it shorter.
almost quote from S.L. Clemens

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luvglass

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Posted: 02/21/12 06:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

tenbear wrote:

I understood that they were transported vertically because if the top was to break off it would be like a rifle shot.


That is true for the high pressure gas cylinders, like Oxygen, Nitrogen, CO2, etc. Propane is stored in low pressure cylinders.


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JoeChiOhki

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Posted: 02/21/12 06:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

luvglass wrote:

tenbear wrote:

I understood that they were transported vertically because if the top was to break off it would be like a rifle shot.


That is true for the high pressure gas cylinders, like Oxygen, Nitrogen, CO2, etc. Propane is stored in low pressure cylinders.


By comparison, of course. Your average propane cylinder is at around 200 odd PSI vs the 1000-3000 PSI of a gas cylinder.

tenbear

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Posted: 02/21/12 06:56pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JoeChiOhki wrote:

luvglass wrote:

tenbear wrote:

I understood that they were transported vertically because if the top was to break off it would be like a rifle shot.


That is true for the high pressure gas cylinders, like Oxygen, Nitrogen, CO2, etc. Propane is stored in low pressure cylinders.


By comparison, of course. Your average propane cylinder is at around 200 odd PSI vs the 1000-3000 PSI of a gas cylinder.


Thank you! I guess I assumed this from my days as an EMT, working with Oxygen cylinders. I learned something new.


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