RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Towing: Too much spring bar tension?

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Towing

Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > Too much spring bar tension?

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Next
Sponsored By:
jerem0621

Tennessee

Senior Member

Joined: 05/17/2009

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/21/12 06:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I studied the writings of one Andy Thomson from Can-Am RV in Canada. Basically I learned about the "equal squat" theory for setting up wd hitches. Basically I have achieved 1/2 inch squat on the front and rear fenders.

I have a 1100/11000 lb hidden hitch which apparently is from the late 90's

I have 6500 lb trailer with approx 900 lbs tongue weight.

Husky 1000 lb trunnions bars

Dual friction sway control. (soon to be reese dual cam)

I took my trailer to the local tire shop to have my new tires installed and decide that since I was on levelish concreteI would take a few shots of my rig.





Here is a shot of the hitch all hooked up. Other than needing some sand paper and paint I am (was) pretty confident in the set up.



Here is a side shot and the problem I noticed tonight. I think I have too much tension on the bars.



The trunnions bars are bowed. And the hitch head appeares to be torqued up. Maybe it's the angle. But I think that my thoughts on equal squat need adjusting.

Here is a similar shot with the trailer uncoupled.



With that said there is a decent amout of play between the shank and the receiver.

The truck tows great as it is set up. I am just concerned that I am over working the spring bars. I mean if the trunnion bars are bowed isn't that an indication that they are operating outside their design parameters.

Dual-cam kit should be here tomorrow. I know I will have to reset the hitch some and I want to make sure I do it right.

Thanks.

Jeremiah

* This post was edited 02/21/12 07:03pm by jerem0621 *


2014 Chrysler Town And Country
3.6 Pentastar V6

"It's Kind of Fun To Do The Impossible"
~Walt Disney~

patinlouisiana

Baton Rouge, La

Full Member

Joined: 01/29/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/21/12 07:30pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am of the impression that if the spring bars were not bowed and in tension you do not need them. They are designed to be in tension.


I never get lost! Someone always tells me where to go!

2012 Prime time Tracer 230FBS Touring Edition
2010 Toyota Sequoia Limited 4X2


skipnchar

Topeka or somewhere else

Senior Member

Joined: 12/17/2003

View Profile



Posted: 02/21/12 07:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you have a significant amount of too much tension you should find that you can spin the rear wheels on acceleration too easily. Step on the gas a couple of times and see how it goes. I don't see anything that would be of much concern as your spring bars are approximately parallel to the trailer frame rails as they should be and there is sufficient room for them to pass below the frame in a tight turn.

Good luck / Skip


2011 F-150 HD Ecoboost 3.5 V6. 2550 payload, 17,100 GCVWR -
2004 F-150 HD (Traded after 80,000 towing miles)
2007 Rockwood 8314SS 34' travel trailer

US Govt survey shows three out of four people make up 75% of the total population


jerem0621

Tennessee

Senior Member

Joined: 05/17/2009

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/21/12 07:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

skipnchar wrote:

If you have a significant amount of too much tension you should find that you can spin the rear wheels on acceleration too easily. Step on the gas a couple of times and see how it goes. I don't see anything that would be of much concern as your spring bars are approximately parallel to the trailer frame rails as they should be and there is sufficient room for them to pass below the frame in a tight turn.

Good luck / Skip


Thanks Skip,

The truck is planted solid on the ground. I can put the truck in drive and the truck will pull the trailer without even giving it any gas. From a standing start I can't break the tires lose.

Hopefully the dual cam install will go ok. I am not sure how much better the tow can get. It is a very solid tow as it is.

If you will notice the score marks under the snap up bars, they are from the PO who did not have this trailer hitch adjusted correctly and the wd bars would crash into the frame on turns.

Thanks

gmw photos

midwest

Senior Member

Joined: 12/11/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/21/12 10:04pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just a thought, but I think some of the late model truck manufacturers spec that the front should be brought back to just level, and not made to squat.
I have mine set up to do that....front to normal height, and the back squats 1/2 to 5/8 inch. But then my truck and camper are lighter than you rig ( by a lot ) so it may not compare.

One thing that I have read that seems common among all the WD hitch companies is that under no circumstance should you be raising the rear of the TV above unloaded height, and since you said you are squatting the rear, it sounds like you must be pretty close.

Have you taken it to the scales yet ?

RockDodger

Northeast Illinois

Full Member

Joined: 06/05/2011

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/22/12 03:29am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It appears from your photos that your tow vehicle is a little high in the rear. My instruction sheet told me that the rear should be slightly lower than the front to prevent front end crush on uneven roads. Maybe let out one more link? Just my two cents worth.


Terry & Marsha
2007 Toyota FJ Cruiser, V-6, 4WD
1987 Sunline Satellite, 20', Reese anti-sway

Northeast Illinois


Ron Gratz

full time RVer

Senior Member

Joined: 12/27/2003

View Profile



Posted: 02/22/12 05:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jerem0621 wrote:

I studied the writings of one Andy Thomson from Can-Am RV in Canada. Basically I learned about the "equal squat" theory for setting up wd hitches. Basically I have achieved 1/2 inch squat on the front and rear fenders.
The "equal squat" theory originated back when the typical tow vehicle was the family sedan. IMO, the "theory" does not apply to modern tow vehicles which are capable of carrying more weight on their rear axle.

Ford now says the WDH should be adjusted so that only about 50% of the front-end rise is eliminated. Equal-i-zer say that at least 50% of the rise should be eliminated. These are two examples of recent changes in recommendations for adjusting the WDH.

IMO, if you have 1/2" squat on the front end, you have too much tension on the WD bars. I recommend returning the front to a height which is close to or slightly above the unhitched height.

There's nothing wrong with having more squat at the rear. Your truck is designed to carry added load on its rear axle. Added load produces added squat. If Ford didn't want the rear to squat as it does when loaded, they would install stiffer springs. Just ensure that you do not exceed the GVWR or the rear GAWR.

Ron

jerem0621

Tennessee

Senior Member

Joined: 05/17/2009

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/22/12 06:14am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks all. When I pick up my TT today from getting my tires replaced I am going to measure the front fenders and see if I can go from six chain links to seven. Right now I have three extra chain links. Maybe I have too much head tilt?

Thanks

Chuck&Gail

In the Colorado Mountains

Senior Member

Joined: 06/16/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/22/12 02:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've used the "equal squat" theory for over 200,000 happy miles. It sure works for me. Also when I do a "4-wheel weighing" (actually 8 wheels, as I do TV AND TT) the way I adjust my WDH gives me an increase in both front and rear TV axle weights that I'm happy with and are within my GAWR's. If I adjust for front to be same height hooked and unhooked I'm WAY over the rear GAWR.

Your findings may vary, but IMHO the true test is TV axle weights.


Chuck
Wonderful Wife
Australian Shepherd
2010 Ford Expedition TV
2010 Outback 230RS Toybox, 5390# UVW, 6800# Loaded
Not yet camped in Hawaii, 2 Canada Provinces, & 2 Territories
I can't be lost because I don't care where this lovely road is going

nohurry

Orting, Wa

Senior Member

Joined: 01/10/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/22/12 05:30am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This was given to me as a general rule, and it seems to have worked pretty well; Park on level ground. Measure the hieght from the ground to the lip of the front fender BEFORE hitching up. After hitching up, install WD bars and adjust until the front fender lip is approx the same distancec or within 1/2". This gets you real close but YMMV.


Carl
2013 F250 6.2
2011 Jayco 256RKS
Co-pilot-Sharon
Navigators-Missy, and Petey (chihuahuas)

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Towing

 > Too much spring bar tension?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Towing


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS