RV.Net Open Roads Forum: A Proper Definition of B+ (Australian Style)

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > A Proper Definition of B+ (Australian Style)

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Prev
Sponsored By:
RobertRyan

Australia

Senior Member

Joined: 03/16/2008

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/24/12 01:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Frances Knowles wrote:

So...is it "size dependent"?
I'm interested in how such a conversion would be treated if confronted with "Class A-under-ten-years only" restrictions.

Seems unlikely that the guy at the gate would be calling the RVIA for direction in that department...

Thanks!

Yes size dependent. A Japanese 30-32ft Bus is used mainly for local area transport A Scania,MAN, Volvo Coach is normally over 40ft, carries many passengers and is fairly luxurious. Age of the vehicles does not come into it.
A converted 25-27ft Hino Bus

an old 1980's Denning Motorhome 40ft Long.


* This post was last edited 02/24/12 01:24am by RobertRyan *   View edit history

Francesca Knowles

Port Hadlock, Washington

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2011

View Profile



Posted: 02/24/12 11:05am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So those conversions would be "Class A's", is that right?


" Not every mind that wanders is lost. " With apologies to J.R.R. Tolkien

RobertRyan

Australia

Senior Member

Joined: 03/16/2008

View Profile


Online
Posted: 02/24/12 12:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Francesa Yes they would be

burlmart

Baton Rouge

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/24/12 01:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The Wiki for Australia RV classes largely reflects a synthesis of US and British classifications. The following info is from "Campervans" (British) Wiki

The British use Class A just like AU and US. They do not have a Class C, but talk about coachbuilts (cutaway chassis with a coach built on) either as having an overhanging bed (over cab), or being low profile.

Low profiles are "Coachbuilt but without a raised bed over the cab…Typical base vehicles are lighter-duty and/or smaller-engined variants of the same vehicles used for overcab designs.”

Thus, the low profile is our good friend, the B+: a smaller C w/o a cabover.

As for British B-class: “This term is not commonly used except for imported North American models, which may vary greatly in size from semi-low profile coachbuilts to van conversions.”

So we also see that in Britain as in AU, Class B includes our B+.


Instead of our odd sequencing of big/luxurious Class A, smaller but similar Class C, and smalleer yet, Class B (and worse, still, they are now Type A, B, and C), consider the British scheme: Big/luxurious, Class A; at the other extreme, conversion vans and campervans w/ no toilet. In between there are various 'coach builts' (I really would like to know if we got Class C from this word, coachbuilt).

Thats it. No mixed-up lettering that constrains manufacturers like LTV in ability to properly market the goods. And, no reason for RVIA to desensitize the word 'class' with 'Type'.

* This post was last edited 02/24/12 02:39pm by burlmart *   View edit history


2005 Trail Lite 213 B-Plus w/ 6.0 Chevy


Francesca Knowles

Port Hadlock, Washington

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2011

View Profile



Posted: 02/24/12 07:48pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

burlmart wrote:

(I really would like to know if we got Class C from this word, coachbuilt).

I know this one!

Here in the U.S.A., "Class C" was actually the first letter-based designation of what we all now refer to as motorhomes.

It goes back to the earliest mass-produced units permanently mounted on a truck Chassis, which were at first called Chassis Mount Campers.
The "C", of course, came from "chassis".
Personally, I think this construction method superior to the ground-up type...but you have to hand it to the industry for making some folks believe that a "Class A" label actually means the rig is somehow "better"!



burlmart

Baton Rouge

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/25/12 04:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Francesca

Thanks, that was very helpful for my thinking about all this.

burlmart

Baton Rouge

Senior Member

Joined: 03/28/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/27/12 04:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I guess the big implication from this is that you can classify a rig by its hardware specifications, as we do in the US using Class C to mean Chassis-built, or look at it functionally like the UK and AU as Coach-built with intent on low-profile, Class B type character.

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Prev

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes

 > A Proper Definition of B+ (Australian Style)
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS