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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > ??? adding weight to the rear of RV

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gijoecam

Midwest

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Posted: 02/28/12 06:16am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm with everybody else here... No way is it a good idea. Not for that kind of weight, unless, of course, you already have an obscenely high tongue weight, a trailer with a frame built to handle those kinds of loads, and axles rated to handle the additional thousand pounds. Putting it in the bed may not be an option due to the rear axle weight rating of the tow vehicle (or the type of tow vehicle you have).

Bottom line is it's just not the right way to do it.

Snowman9000

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Posted: 02/28/12 06:35am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In that kind of scenario with weight added behind the axles, does the rear axle carry more of the increase than the front axle? Or does the equalizer work some magic?


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JoyceandSteve

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Posted: 02/28/12 06:50am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thought about a trailer behind the TT? There are a lot of different opionins on it, but it is legal in Tx. Personally I just drive mine into the bed of the truck.


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ExRocketScientist

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Posted: 02/28/12 07:52am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Snowman9000 wrote:

In that kind of scenario with weight added behind the axles, does the rear axle carry more of the increase than the front axle? Or does the equalizer work some magic?

My experiments indicate that the equalizers aren't perfect. If the trailer does not tow level, there can be anywhere from a couple hundred pounds to many hundreds of pounds different between the axles. On a 30 foot trailer that is 2" higher in the front than the back, you will see number like 100 pounds different. I have no data for the trailers that are 4 or 6 inches higher in the front than the back, but just playing around lifting one wheel, I have seen the weight on that wheel go up as high as 400 pounds and the adjacent wheel still be firmly on the ground. That is lifting the one wheel about 3.5 inches off of the ground.


ERS

ExRocketScientist

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Posted: 02/28/12 07:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think the OP should be looking at trading up to a toy hauler. They are purpose made for this sort of thing.

Snowman9000

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Posted: 02/28/12 07:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks. How about if you add weight to the tail?

ExRocketScientist

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Posted: 02/28/12 08:02am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Snowman9000 wrote:

Thanks. How about if you add weight to the tail?

Adding the weight at the back makes the suspension settle more, making the back go down. At the same time, the tongue/pin weight will go down, resulting in the front of the trailer rising some. So the combined effect is to make the front higher than the back if the trailer was already level. Of course if the front were an inch lower than the back to begin with, this might just level it out.

Wills250psd

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Posted: 02/28/12 08:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On a bumpy hyway that 5-6 hundred pounds will go to 1k or more the stress is to much for the frame the bouncing is what will cause the problems.IMHO

Snowman9000

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Posted: 02/28/12 08:21am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ExRocketScientist wrote:

Snowman9000 wrote:

Thanks. How about if you add weight to the tail?

Adding the weight at the back makes the suspension settle more, making the back go down. At the same time, the tongue/pin weight will go down, resulting in the front of the trailer rising some. So the combined effect is to make the front higher than the back if the trailer was already level. Of course if the front were an inch lower than the back to begin with, this might just level it out.


So the answer is "it depends".

But either way it is going onto the axles.

I'm wondering if I put 100 lbs on the tail, is some of it going to be on the front axle? What is your SWAG about the percent of it going to the rear axle, and to the front axle? I'm guessing it's not 50-50 per your comments above. Is it 100-0? Percent, not absolute weights, since the math won't be 1:1 given the teeter-totter thing.

gijoecam

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Posted: 02/28/12 09:08am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What are these equalizers of which you speak? {anybody else got tandem torsion axles like me??}

Theoretically, and depending on the lengths of trailer fore and aft of the axles, the number will vary, but lets assume that adding 500lbs levers 350lbs off the tongue. The entire 850lbs gets transferred to the axles. Exactly how much depends on the specific spring rates at all four springs, function of the equalizer, etc. Theoretically, with the spring rates all the same and the equalizer working properly, 1/4 of the added weight will be placed on each tire. In reality, your mileage may vary.

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