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Open Roads Forum  >  Fifth-Wheels

 > Jacking up trailer for flat tire

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Kennedycamper

Algoa, Texas

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Posted: 03/06/12 11:47am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You already have all the weight of one side of the trailer on one tire when you have the flat. So people must be saying to throw that tire away as soon as possible when you have a flat. Do we need to carry two spares then? Tires are rated to carry a given weight at speed. They will carry much more at very low speeds. It's a heat build up thing.

OldGreaser

South Texas

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Posted: 03/06/12 12:46pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The best way to fully protect the tires is to roll the trailer on its side or upside down. Change tires and gently reposition your rig.

ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Posted: 03/06/12 04:53pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kennedycamper wrote:

You already have all the weight of one side of the trailer on one tire when you have the flat. So people must be saying to throw that tire away as soon as possible when you have a flat. Do we need to carry two spares then? Tires are rated to carry a given weight at speed. They will carry much more at very low speeds. It's a heat build up thing.

If there is no weight on the wheel with the flat, do I need an impact wrench to get the lug nuts loose?


ERS

ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Posted: 03/06/12 04:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OldGreaser wrote:

The best way to fully protect the tires is to roll the trailer on its side or upside down. Change tires and gently reposition your rig.

Just stop the rig crosswise of the interstate. Tell everyone caught in the traffic jam behind you that you can't get out of the way until the tire is changed and you have no way to lift it other than for a whole bunch of those people to get under the thing and bench press it.

ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Posted: 03/06/12 04:59pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dannytas wrote:

scarceller wrote:

So if you can't change a tire by jacking the axle.
And you can't change it by block one wheel to change the other.

Then the only way to safely change the tire is to jack by the frame on that side and lift both tires off the ground, is this the answer we are looking for?


I'm with you!!! What is the best way to change a tire?? Following this thread...if you were to jack up the one complete side to change a single tire, by the frame mind you, wouldn't you be putting twice that weight on the two tires on the other side of the trailer? Or is the only safe way, to jack up the whole trailer, by the frame, to change "one" tire?? I'm from the "school" that all opinions count, for something!!!!

So if you jack up one side by the frame, the other side that normally holds half of the weight now has double that. So 2 times 1/2 = 1. So all of the weight of the trailer would be on the other side. So if all of the weight is on the other side, then there is no weight on the jack. Well if you can lift the side with the flat by the frame with a jack and not put any weight on the jack, why not just have a passenger reach down and lift it up and hold it for you. Even a five year old kid should be able to do it because there is no weight to it. Saves you the trouble of carrying anything extra.

ExRocketScientist

Laurel, MD

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Posted: 03/06/12 05:33pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I kind of like the idea of putting most of the weight on a bottle jack under the frame but then using the tow vehicle jack under the axle. That is sort of what we did when we changed which hole in the spring hangers we were using on my fiver to change the ride height. We did it in a friends driveway, which was gravel. With the bottle jack resting on an 11" cubic block of wood, it was amazing how stable it was. Come to think of it, aren't some road shoulder gravel just like a driveway?

I actually got a PM a while back from someone who was not sure about using their stock truck jack. I was messing around a couple days later and threw my truck jack under and took this picture for them.

Here is the jack placed under the axle tube adjacent to my tie plate (the person who asked me had a suspension with the springs over top of the axle and was worried about crushing the axle tube, so I used my axle tube to show it would not crush it).



In this next picture, I have the tire up enough off of the ground to change the tire. The adjacent tire is still firmly planted on the ground.


I was actually too lazy to get the jack handle out. I used a screwdriver and an open end wrench (on the square screwdriver blade)to turn the knob on the jack. It wasn't easy and it was slow. I don't recommend that method. What I should do is make an adapter for the cordless drill . . . hey, now there's an idea

In this next picture you can see it is up just enough to do the job. This amount is no different than running up on one "lego block" with the one tire as far as the amount of movement of the suspension goes.



Based on my experiments with the Sherline scale, I have increased the weight on the spring and spring hangers there by about 100 pounds. The reason it is not more is because of this little device that the ends of my springs connect to:



When one wheel goes up, the end of the spring where it attaches to this thing goes up. Because this thing pivots, it shoves the end of the other spring down. It keeps pivoting until the force on each end of this thing is the same, and thus the weight on each spring is the same. So as long as you have not exceeded the range of motion of this thing, it will equalize the weight on the two adjacent wheels pretty close (not perfectly because the geometry is not perfect -- but it come pretty darn close). Oddly enough, this part is for some reason or another called an "equalizer". They claim they put these things in the suspension system so that you don't overload components just by going over small bumps. The problem with a tandem axle torsion suspension is you don't have anything like this in the system. When you start going over bumps, you increase the weight on one wheel for a short period of time. The bigger the bump, the worse it is.

By the way, my equalizer is one of the premium shock absorbing type -- the Dexter EZ-Flex. The regular ones are just a cast piece of metal in a trianguler shape.

tomman58

Southeast Michigan

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Posted: 03/06/12 05:41pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use a "trailer Aide" about 30 bucks at the rv shows or campers world. I only used it once and it worked really well.
You just drive up on it and it raises the flat off the ground, cool.


2015 GMC D/A, CC 4x4/ Z71 ,3.73,IBC SLT+
2015 Jayco 338RETS
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It must be time to go, the suns out and I've got a full tank of diesel!
Lifes short enough without bitch'n about it!

Nomadac

Columbus, IN

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Posted: 03/07/12 04:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

FYI most axle Mfg. do not recommend jacking under the axle tube. Most RV Mfg. recommend placing the jack under the frame between the two tires. Some recommend under the spring plate below the spring. Either of the latter provide a more slip resistant location vs. the round axle tube.

Best advice is to read your Owners Manual or contact the Mfg. for their recommendations. I think they might have a wee bit more experience they a forum, JMO.


Arnie
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Nomadac

Columbus, IN

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Posted: 03/07/12 04:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ExRocketScientist Quote:
Here is the jack placed under the axle tube adjacent to my tie plate (the person who asked me had a suspension with the springs over top of the axle and was worried about crushing the axle tube, so I used my axle tube to show it would not crush it).

FYI most axle Mfg. do not recommend jacking under the axle tube. Most RV Mfg. recommend placing the jack under the frame between the two tires. Some recommend under the spring plate below the spring. Either of the latter provide a more slip resistant location vs. the round axle tube.

Best advice is to read your Owners Manual or contact the Mfg. for their recommendations. I think they might have a wee bit more experience they a forum, JMO.

Duck

Miami Lakes, Fl

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Posted: 03/07/12 05:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was told by NuWa to jack under the frame and do not jack under the axle.
Don


08-FORD F350 PSD
13 Bighorn 3055RL

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