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 > Work camping in Florida

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Ewings2

USA

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Posted: 03/06/12 03:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My husband and I have been work camping for the last 7 years. We love it and have had many jobs. This next winter we would like to go to Florida. We have never been there. I have been looking at several places, but I would like to get some imput from people who have worked in the state. We would like to be in the Tampa area, but will consider all other areas. Any suggestions or tips?

square dancers

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Posted: 03/06/12 03:44pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Florida. Quail Roost RV Campground, a clean, friendly campground in Crystal River looking for maintenance/handyman. Skills needed in maintaining lawn and other equipment, plumbing, light electrical and general maintenance. Compensation is site, including cable, WiFi and first $100 electric in exchange for 24 hours per week. Long term preferred. Check us out at: www.quailroostrv.com then email us at: nancyfife@ymail.com or call: 352-601-0812.

9835 N. Citrus Ave.,
Crystal River, FL 34428
Phone: 352.563.0404
Fax: 352.795.1224
E-mail: qroost@hotmail.com
nancyfife@ymail.com
NO DOGS, PLEASE!


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Denny & Jami

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Posted: 03/06/12 05:50pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I can tell you one thing to look out for in Florida and that is one of the parks/resorts that are selling lots. We are in one now and can't wait to get out of here. If it wasn't for the fact that we always honor our contacts we would have been out of here a long time ago.

Denny


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HappyKayakers

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Posted: 03/06/12 06:45pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

paid positions go very quickly, start early and be prepared to cast a wide net. Maybe look at some tourist attractions instead of working in a campground.


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WishUponanRVStar!

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Posted: 03/07/12 07:09am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have been in Florida this winter and plan to for the foreseeable winters...family obligations in the area. They are nice enough to let us wander for 8-9 months of the year, so we'll hang out with them for the winter :-).
That said, I have given up on workamping here...I have sent out dozens of emails to campgrounds in the area. Only a handful even bothered to respond, and those that did don't pay,want a lot of hours worked for the site, or require you to work for the summer to "qualify" to work in the winter. This is in the Spring Hill north to Inglis area on the gulf coast, east towards Inverness and Bushnell. I have had to develop a thick skin to slough off the non-replies without taking it personally. We have decided to pick up work in the fall after our summer jobs out west, tighten up the budget overall, and then enjoy the three months visiting with our families Jan-March.

square dancers

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Posted: 03/07/12 09:01am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ewings2

I would like to echo the thoughts of wishuponanrvstar.

We have family around the Tampa area and spent several months looking into Workamping in that area. What we found was most parks want a yearly or permanent commitment. Many of the parks we contacted didn’t bother to respond to our inquiry. The only interest was from Corporate parks which have many hours required and they weren’t interested in our schedule only their needs. I contacted the source I gave you in my previous reply and asked about the no dogs and was told that does not apply to Workampers, I can see problems with that. We decided to fore-go a doubled thousand + mile trip to Florida and stay here in the wide open west.

westernrvparkowner

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Posted: 03/07/12 09:20am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't take a lack of reply to a resume submittal personally. With the internet, people literally send resumes to 1000s of businesses with a click of the mouse. We only respond to personally addressed resumes with a cover letter that includes information about us that could only be found through research. If the resume and cover letter reads something like "We are interested in a position in your campground (not our specific park, just the word campground), we are looking for a position in the western USA (again, not our specific town), blah blah blah", we just put it in the junk mail file, because that is what it appears to be. This is especially true if we are not actively seeking help. We usually do reply back if the body of the cover letter includes the park name, location and a tidbit or two personalizing our park, something like "we looked at your website, www.XYZPARK.com , read the reviews, and the saw that you were close to the river and we are avid fishermen and kayakers so we are keenly interested working at XYZ Park in the future". The snowbird areas get inundated with people looking to workamp. That is why they can command a large number of hours per site. It is basic supply and demand. Many are also a bit overbuilt, so they really don't lose much hiring relatively large staffs offering only sites. This is contrary to parks like mine where we have less sites than demand, so we have to have each occupied site provide us two workers and we usually look for 40 hours per each worker. We pay full wages, because we really need the Worker part of Workamper. Ten or 12 hours per week emptying trash in exchange for a site would put us out of business, it won't at the large snowbird parks where there are always unoccupied sites, or sites built exclusively for the workampers that are not rentable to the general public.

square dancers

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Posted: 03/07/12 12:38pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

westernrvparkowner,

Some good points in your reply. When I cold contact a prospective Workamper site I Identify ourselves, identify their park, ask if they use Workampers, send a photo and business card, request a reply, offer to send a complete resume with photos, ending with a thank you and our names and email. I don’t believe that Park Owners are inundated with workamper requests that are generated from cold contacts; I also believe that I view each prospective Owner/Manager as a future employer and would hope they would reciprocate in kind to my being a future employee.

westernrvparkowner

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Posted: 03/07/12 01:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

square dancers wrote:

westernrvparkowner,

Some good points in your reply. When I cold contact a prospective Workamper site I Identify ourselves, identify their park, ask if they use Workampers, send a photo and business card, request a reply, offer to send a complete resume with photos, ending with a thank you and our names and email. I don’t believe that Park Owners are inundated with workamper requests that are generated from cold contacts; I also believe that I view each prospective Owner/Manager as a future employer and would hope they would reciprocate in kind to my being a future employee.
I guess it would depend on your definition of inundated. We generally have 5 or 6 a week in our e-mail accounts. Maybe 1 or 2 a week are personalized at all, and many of them look like a form letter where the park name and location is just dropped in from a spread sheet. Seldom do they include any kind of information that would take personal effort to find out, they are just very generic cover letters sometimes with resumes attached, sometimes not. They just don't have any appeal to me to generate the curiosity to investigate or respond back. Sorry if that makes us bad, but we are in the RV park business, not the respond to every e-mail seeking something from us business. Would it really make any difference if we sent a two word e-mail response "Not Interested"?

* This post was edited 03/07/12 05:25pm by westernrvparkowner *

Irover

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Posted: 03/08/12 08:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The only way I would work camp in Florida is if I had reason(s) to be there. I lived there for awhile and had a few interviews. I realize that like any business they are in it for profits. What I found most Fall-Winter positions in warm southern states want more hours for site than most do in other states. The position listed was Camp host: Light maintenance, mowing, dispensing propane, escorting; etc. After you start working, they also expect for low or no pay that you do heavy laborous tasks, Eg: roofing, setting cabins, ditch digging, Etc.

I found out the best way is to get every detail in writing, signed by both parties. If they require more, then you should be remunerated. If I come to work for someone, I treat them with the utmost respect, work to the best of my capability, am honest and try my best to perform the job requrements. I expect the Owners/Managers to reciprocrate in like.

I have work camped since 1998 and have worked for about a dozen employers and have had two that I would not work for again; because of their disrespect, and dishonesty. I have always completed the commitment I bargained for. If the employer makes it to difficult and unbearable and I realize that I am not wanted; my house has wheels. Rover

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