RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Workamping Forum: Work camping in Florida

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Workamping Forum

Open Roads Forum  >  Workamping Forum

 > Work camping in Florida

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
Ewings2

USA

New Member

Joined: 03/06/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 03/08/12 08:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WOW! I see lots of good information here. I learned something about the cover letter and resume. I don't send the email without calling first or looking at the website. We have worked in three parks in the last eight years. Only one was a realy good experience. The other two were not real bad. However, I think I would like to talk with someone who has worked in the park before. I can put up with anything if I can enjoy the area. We seem to always make friends and make the job work for us. We are looking at doing some state parks, fish and wildlife. Any suggestion on good ones and bad ones?

DianneOK

Donnelly, ID

Moderator

Joined: 03/19/2004

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 03/08/12 11:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We volunteered for the Black Bayou NWR in Monroe, LA. What a fantastic experience. We did 2 tours and were ready to do the third when life interfered and we had to leave the FT lifestyle.

We also volunteered at 4 different state parks in 4 states, as well as several county parks. The government and private positions were all enjoyable. We had 18 positions in all over 8 years.


Dianne (and Terry) (Fulltimed for 9 years)
Donnelly, ID
HAM WB6N (Terry)
2012 Ford F350, diesel, 4x4 SRW, crew cab, longbed
2009 Lance 971 Truck Camper, loaded


Life Member Good Sam
Geocache..."RVcachers"
RV net Blog

Camping, nature's way to feed the mosquitoes


Wayne and Maureen

East Coast, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 03/13/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/08/12 03:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ewings2 wrote:

WOW! I see lots of good information here. I learned something about the cover letter and resume. I don't send the email without calling first or looking at the website. We have worked in three parks in the last eight years. Only one was a realy good experience. The other two were not real bad. However, I think I would like to talk with someone who has worked in the park before. I can put up with anything if I can enjoy the area. We seem to always make friends and make the job work for us. We are looking at doing some state parks, fish and wildlife. Any suggestion on good ones and bad ones?

Go to the Florida State park website and get a gig with a park....once in, you will have all kinds of doors open up with info on other work camp jobs. Making friends is how it works in Florida. We are headed back to Delaware and at the stop over park where we are staying until Saturday, our neighbors asked the park owner for a job and they start Monday. Enjoy the ride!!


Wayne and Maureen
On the Road
Visit our FullTimer Blog


texasclarks

Morgantown, WV

Senior Member

Joined: 02/10/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 03/08/12 08:29pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

westernrvparkowner wrote:

Irover wrote:

The only way I would work camp in Florida is if I had reason(s) to be there. I lived there for awhile and had a few interviews. I realize that like any business they are in it for profits. What I found most Fall-Winter positions in warm southern states want more hours for site than most do in other states. The position listed was Camp host: Light maintenance, mowing, dispensing propane, escorting; etc. After you start working, they also expect for low or no pay that you do heavy laborous tasks, Eg: roofing, setting cabins, ditch digging, Etc.

I found out the best way is to get every detail in writing, signed by both parties. If they require more, then you should be remunerated. If I come to work for someone, I treat them with the utmost respect, work to the best of my capability, am honest and try my best to perform the job requrements. I expect the Owners/Managers to reciprocrate in like.

I have work camped since 1998 and have worked for about a dozen employers and have had two that I would not work for again; because of their disrespect, and dishonesty. I have always completed the commitment I bargained for. If the employer makes it to difficult and unbearable and I realize that I am not wanted; my house has wheels. Rover
This has been discussed before. In my opinion (which is important if you want a position at one of my parks) expecting a detailed list of duties and having the expectation that those will be the only duties you will ever have to do is an unreasonable expectation. We feel that as long as it is not immoral, illegal, dangerous or beyond your physical capabilities we should be able to assign any task that may arise. We give all our employees a job description of the basic duties but situations arise and we expect flexibility during those situations. For example, duties may be mowing and taking to sites, but if we have a sewer or water line problem and it needs to be dug up, we will expect you to pitch in and help. Telling us that it is not in your job description will earn you the opportunity to put those wheels on your house to good use.


Maybe it's just me, but I don't expect the work campers hired to work front office or to do light maintenance to fill in for laborers that require heavy labor like digging up sewer line or water lines. That is why the park should hire (and pay monies) for maintenance personnel who are laid to perform heavy labor type work. Maybe my opinion of work camping is wrong, but you can't expect to 'pay' someone to do 24 +/- hours a week for a $500 site. That is about 100 a month, that is not (or should be) the rate for laborers... Front Office, welcome crew, and escorts yes. Manual laborers like digging up sewers and water lines would be crossing the line.


Posts are for entertainment purposes only and should not be construed as endorsement or recommendations. YMMV!

Steven & Stacie, plus 2 ('02 & '07)
'04 Suburban 2500, Quad Seats, 8.1L, 3.73
'09 Rockwood 8313SS

Texas not just a State, but a State of mind!


westernrvparkowner

montana

Senior Member

Joined: 11/29/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/08/12 09:55pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

texasclarks wrote:

westernrvparkowner wrote:

Irover wrote:

The only way I would work camp in Florida is if I had reason(s) to be there. I lived there for awhile and had a few interviews. I realize that like any business they are in it for profits. What I found most Fall-Winter positions in warm southern states want more hours for site than most do in other states. The position listed was Camp host: Light maintenance, mowing, dispensing propane, escorting; etc. After you start working, they also expect for low or no pay that you do heavy laborous tasks, Eg: roofing, setting cabins, ditch digging, Etc.

I found out the best way is to get every detail in writing, signed by both parties. If they require more, then you should be remunerated. If I come to work for someone, I treat them with the utmost respect, work to the best of my capability, am honest and try my best to perform the job requrements. I expect the Owners/Managers to reciprocrate in like.

I have work camped since 1998 and have worked for about a dozen employers and have had two that I would not work for again; because of their disrespect, and dishonesty. I have always completed the commitment I bargained for. If the employer makes it to difficult and unbearable and I realize that I am not wanted; my house has wheels. Rover
This has been discussed before. In my opinion (which is important if you want a position at one of my parks) expecting a detailed list of duties and having the expectation that those will be the only duties you will ever have to do is an unreasonable expectation. We feel that as long as it is not immoral, illegal, dangerous or beyond your physical capabilities we should be able to assign any task that may arise. We give all our employees a job description of the basic duties but situations arise and we expect flexibility during those situations. For example, duties may be mowing and taking to sites, but if we have a sewer or water line problem and it needs to be dug up, we will expect you to pitch in and help. Telling us that it is not in your job description will earn you the opportunity to put those wheels on your house to good use.


Maybe it's just me, but I don't expect the work campers hired to work front office or to do light maintenance to fill in for laborers that require heavy labor like digging up sewer line or water lines. That is why the park should hire (and pay monies) for maintenance personnel who are laid to perform heavy labor type work. Maybe my opinion of work camping is wrong, but you can't expect to 'pay' someone to do 24 +/- hours a week for a $500 site. That is about 100 a month, that is not (or should be) the rate for laborers... Front Office, welcome crew, and escorts yes. Manual laborers like digging up sewers and water lines would be crossing the line.
Don't quite know where you get 24 hours a week for a $500 site. Our sites run over $1200 a month, minimum and we actually provide a site and pay all hours. You may have misunderstood me, I would never tell a employee it was a site escort site job and then tell them "surprise, you are digging ditches". But I would fully expect any and all able bodied employees to pitch in if we had an emergency situation arise that meant we had to dig up a line. We are surely not a large enough operation to employ full time manual laborers or any one job - full time anything. Have a reservation job, expect to also clerk in the store and stock shelves and take inventory when necessary. Might even be asked to pitch in cleaning a cabin or two if the housekeeping person calls in sick. We are a very small business and we need everyone to pitch in when and where it is needed. We make that clear before we hire anyone and hopefully they will be honest like you, and tell us if that will not work for them. Not all positions work for everyone.

westernrvparkowner

montana

Senior Member

Joined: 11/29/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/08/12 11:25am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Irover wrote:

The only way I would work camp in Florida is if I had reason(s) to be there. I lived there for awhile and had a few interviews. I realize that like any business they are in it for profits. What I found most Fall-Winter positions in warm southern states want more hours for site than most do in other states. The position listed was Camp host: Light maintenance, mowing, dispensing propane, escorting; etc. After you start working, they also expect for low or no pay that you do heavy laborous tasks, Eg: roofing, setting cabins, ditch digging, Etc.

I found out the best way is to get every detail in writing, signed by both parties. If they require more, then you should be remunerated. If I come to work for someone, I treat them with the utmost respect, work to the best of my capability, am honest and try my best to perform the job requrements. I expect the Owners/Managers to reciprocrate in like.

I have work camped since 1998 and have worked for about a dozen employers and have had two that I would not work for again; because of their disrespect, and dishonesty. I have always completed the commitment I bargained for. If the employer makes it to difficult and unbearable and I realize that I am not wanted; my house has wheels. Rover
This has been discussed before. In my opinion (which is important if you want a position at one of my parks) expecting a detailed list of duties and having the expectation that those will be the only duties you will ever have to do is an unreasonable expectation. We feel that as long as it is not immoral, illegal, dangerous or beyond your physical capabilities we should be able to assign any task that may arise. We give all our employees a job description of the basic duties but situations arise and we expect flexibility during those situations. For example, duties may be mowing and taking to sites, but if we have a sewer or water line problem and it needs to be dug up, we will expect you to pitch in and help. Telling us that it is not in your job description will earn you the opportunity to put those wheels on your house to good use.

DianneOK

Donnelly, ID

Moderator

Joined: 03/19/2004

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 03/09/12 07:39am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

westernrvparkowner wrote:

But I would fully expect any and all able bodied employees to pitch in if we had an emergency situation arise that meant we had to dig up a line.


He did say "able bodied"......

We have been in this situation many times and have never been asked to do something beyond our capabilities. I hired on to be the gardener at one resort and many times pitched in with other duties, not because I was told to, but because I took my job seriously and the job had to be done. I worked as if it was my business. Being a small business owner for many years, I understood what it takes and was willing to do it.

I expected the same of the employees I hired, and if they did not want to help, they no longer had the job. I never asked anyone to do a job I would not do myself.

We felt were compensated fairly and enjoyed our times workcamping/volunteering. We were not in it to make a living wage, but to be able to enjoy new places and to have different experiences.

mdbass

Oklahoma

Full Member

Joined: 05/06/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/10/12 11:45pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I used to live in Florida and returned last winter due to my father's illness. Work was very difficult to find and we struggled. I do suggest you consider the Okeechobee area-less than two hours from Tampa. There are many RV resorts there and it is much cheaper to live and work there.
Workamper is currently showing at least two positions near there.


Mark Bass

westernrvparkowner

montana

Senior Member

Joined: 11/29/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 03/09/12 07:41am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jetboater454 wrote:

I don't think western would ask an older workcamper that is not physically able to help dig a line up.When I workcamped in WI the main job was to build a railroad retaining wall.Also cut grass,cleaned a few cabins and restrooms when the other workcamper was out tending to other family matters.An yes,a water line busted that had to be fixed---in the rain.No biggie.In the end it all worked out with extra time off,free dinners ect.
Of course the line broke in the rain. It was probably also at night, on a holiday weekend, when the park was full, directly underneath an RV who's owner was out late that night. Whomever in the universe is in charge of breaking things has a weird sense of humor.

jetboater454

Camping or home

Senior Member

Joined: 07/21/2009

View Profile






Posted: 03/09/12 03:50am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't think western would ask an older workcamper that is not physically able to help dig a line up.When I workcamped in WI the main job was to build a railroad retaining wall.Also cut grass,cleaned a few cabins and restrooms when the other workcamper was out tending to other family matters.An yes,a water line busted that had to be fixed---in the rain.No biggie.In the end it all worked out with extra time off,free dinners ect.


Other half is camping with the angels,Riding alone for now.

2008 3500 Dodge Ram CTD dually 4X4 SOLD
2007 Gulfstream Endura Max 40 SOLD
2001 Polaris Ranger 4X4 SOLD
Harley Dyna Lowrider.

Mod Pics

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Workamping Forum

 > Work camping in Florida
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Workamping Forum


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2014 RV.Net | Terms & Conditions | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS