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Lady Fitzgerald

Tempe, AZ, USA, Earth

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Posted: 03/21/12 06:58pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are now six tankless water heaters approved for RV use available. The Aqua Hot actually is a diesel fired (the others are propane fired) hydronic heating system that also heats domestic water. The Aqua Hots are notoriously expensive to buy and maintain but owners usually swear by them.

Girard makes one model. It is the one most RV manufacturers have been installing in RVs (other than the Aqua Hot). It can be fitted into the same hole both 6 and 10 gl. conventional water heaters use. Water temperature with the Girard is regulated by adjusting the rate of water flow (all others regulate water temperature by blending hot and cold water).

Precision Temp now has two models. The RV 500 has been around for a while and installs in the same hole that 10 gl. conventional water heaters fit into. High wind and winter kits are available to prevent wind from blowing out the flame and to protect the unit from freezing in weather down to -10F.

The RV 550NSP was recently introduced. Instead of having to be mounted in an external wall like most other water heaters, this unit can be installed on the floor anywhere inside of the RV. It is vented through the floor and the exhaust is routed under the RV to the outside wall much like a generator exhaust. Since it is entirely inside the heated area of the RV, there are no concerns for freezing, wind, rain, etc.

Atwood has teamed up with Precision Temp to develop two tankless water heaters to be sold under the Atwood label. One is rated for up to 45,000 BTU and the other is rated for up to 50,000 BTU. The 50,000 BTU model is also equipped with a winter kit (I don't know how low of a temperature it can go without freezing yet since I'm still getting details from Atwood). Both models will fit in a hole designed for both 6 and 10 gl. conventional water heaters. Although not on the market yet (as of a week ago when I last checked), many vendors are taking preorders and it shouldn't be much longer before they ship. The prices are between the Girard and the RV 500.

* This post was edited 03/22/12 03:22pm by Lady Fitzgerald *


Jeannie

Ka Ron

Kelowna

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Posted: 03/21/12 07:04pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lady Fitzgerald wrote:

There are now six tankless water heaters approved for RV use available. The Aqua Hot actually is a diesel fired (the others are propane fired) hydronic heating system that also heats domestic water. The Aqua Hots are notoriously expensive to buy and maintain but owners usually swear by them.

Girard makes one model. It is the one most RV manufacturers have been installing in RVs (other than the Aqua Hot). It can be fitted into the same hole both 6 and 10 gl. conventional water heaters use. Water temperature with the Girard is regulated by adjusting the rate of water flow (all others regulate water temperature by blending hot and cold water).

Precision Temp now has two models. The RV 500 has been around for a while and installs in the same hole that 10 gl. conventional water heaters fit into. High wind and winter kits are available to prevent wind from blowing out the flame and to protect the unit from freezing in weather down to -10F.

The RV 550NSP was recently introduced. Instead of having to be mounted in an external wall like most other water heaters, this unit can be installed on the floor anywhere inside of the RV. It is vented through the floor and the exhaust is routed under the RV to the outside wall much like a generator exhaust. Since it is entirely inside the heated area of the RV, there are no concerns for freezing, wind, rain, etc.

Atwood has teamed up with Precision Temp to develop two tankless water heaters to be sold under the Atwood label. One is rated for up to 45,000 BTU and the other is rated for up to 50,000 BTU. The 50,000 BTU model is also equipped with a winter kit (I don't know how low of a temperature it can go without freezing yet since I'm still getting details from Atwood). Both models will fit in a hole designed for both 6 and 10 gl. conventional water heaters. Although not on the market yet (as of a week ago when I last checked), many vendors are taking preorders and it shouldn't be much longer before they ship. The prices are better than the RV 500 and competive with the Girard.


I can appreciate your research, but if you want to use 50,000 BTU to heat water which is more than a residential conventional tank at the price of propane today, good on you.

The propane companies will love it.


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Lady Fitzgerald

Tempe, AZ, USA, Earth

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Posted: 03/22/12 06:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ka Ron wrote:

...I can appreciate your research, but if you want to use 50,000 BTU to heat water which is more than a residential conventional tank at the price of propane today, good on you.

The propane companies will love it.


It seems like there is a die hard scoffer in every crowd. Go back to my earlier post about propane consumption, specifically the part about tankless water heaters using less propane than tank type water heaters.

With the exception of the Girard, propane fired RV tankless water heaters have variable gas valves so they only run at the top rating when water flow is highest and incoming water temperature is lowest. The gas is burning ONLY while the the water is actually being used. So if one runs the hot water for only, say, 10 minutes in an hour, the water heater will have used a max of 8400 BTUs (generally quite a bit less unless it is extremely cold outside and you are running every faucet in the RV). A 10 gl. tank type water heater will take an hour to heat up a tank of water (this is per Atwood), thus using up to 12,000 BTUs (again, per Atwood) when burning propane only but will run out of hot water in about 10 minutes if running continuously (the water will also be cooling as it is being used instead of maintaining a constant temperature like the tankless water heaters will deliver). It will then have to spend another hour reheating that water back up to temperature. Even then, the tank type water heater will have to fire up every so often to maintain that temperatures. Even the Girard's comparatively primitive two "speed" burner and controls still allow it to be more efficient than tank type water heaters.

* This post was edited 03/22/12 07:22am by Lady Fitzgerald *

Lady Fitzgerald

Tempe, AZ, USA, Earth

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Posted: 03/22/12 12:11pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

holyman wrote:

Can you add a bigger tank on a trailer and does anyone know about what the cost in round figures


Depends. To go to a bigger tank, you have to replace the entire water heater. With one exception, when you go up in the number of gallons, you also go up in size. To go from 6 to 10 gl., for example, you have to have additional room, usually height. Tank type water heaters generally come in 6, 10, and 12 gl. sizes.

Atwood makes 10 gl. water heater called the XT that heats the water to a higher than normal temperature, then uses a mixing valve to temper the temperature to a safer level. This is roughly equivalent to having a 16 gl. tank. The height and width is the same as a conventional 10 gl. water heater but it is roughly 1.5" to 2" deeper.

Keep in mind the bigger the tank, the longer the recovery time required.

Cost depends on what size you are increasing to and the manufacturer. You also have to factor in installation costs and any modifications that have to be made to accomodate the larger unit.

* This post was edited 03/23/12 01:43pm by Lady Fitzgerald *

holyman

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Posted: 03/22/12 07:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Can you add a bigger tank on a trailer and does anyone know about what the cost in round figures

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