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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers

 > 20, 30 & 50 amp sites

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ajwilhorn

Oronoco, MN

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Posted: 05/07/12 07:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Camped plenty in a pop up growing up, but am now new to it with my family as an adult. Bringing home a 2000 Coachman Catalina Wednesday and have questions on the different levels of amp services at sites. What are the limitations with the lower amp sites in what they allow me to hook up and run? Thanks.

RoyB

King George, VA

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Posted: 05/07/12 07:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Most of the sites I go to are usually the 30AMP service. A few has the 50AMP service but since I don't need the 50AMP Service I never really look for that at a site.

If your trailer requires a 30AMP service then I would use a 30AMP connection as it will plug right into it. Your trailer can use the 50 AMP service and the 20 AMP service but you will need to bring along the proper adapters to be able to connect your 30A shore power able to them.

The 20AMP service will run everything in your 30A RV TRAILER but you will experience having too many appliances turned on at the same time will trip the pedstal main breaker. I dont like to trip breakers hehe...

My POPUP trailer requires the 30AMP service but I ocassionally also use their standard 120VAC 20AMP receptacle to power up my oil-filled electric heaters when it is cool. I just hookup another standard extension cord and run into the trailer throu a window flap or something. I would rather use the camp site electricity instead of using up my propane.

My POPUP trailer propane heater system is very loud for running the blower and the heat is way too much for the trailer. Runs us out of there. the portable oil-filled heaters is just prefect for us to us. I found a coupl eof low height oil-filled electric heaters that works just great in our POPUP.


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belairbrian

Alabama

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Posted: 05/07/12 09:00am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sandia Man wrote:

Whatever RV you have will limit the amount of amperage allowed to power your rig via the main circuit breaker. If you have a 30 amp max rig you can still use the 50 amp outlet (using adapter from CW or Walmart) because your circuit breaker will only let up to 30 amps before tripping.


This assumes the overcurrent occurs after the internal 30 amp main breaker inside the power distribution center. In teh event of an overcurrent prior to the internal main the 50 amp brekaer becomes the safety. Usually this is not a problem as most overcurrent situations prior to the internal main are dead shorts and will still trip the breaker.

That said there are situations which could allow more than 30 amps to flow through the shore power cable without tripping any breaker. If this situation occurs, the issue becomes a gradual overheating of the shore power cable or the wiring between the cable and the main breaker.


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Sandia Man

Rio Rancho, NM

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Posted: 05/07/12 07:57am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Whatever RV you have will limit the amount of amperage allowed to power your rig via the main circuit breaker. If you have a 30 amp max rig you can still use the 50 amp outlet (using adapter from CW or Walmart) because your circuit breaker will only let up to 30 amps before tripping.

Bit Bucket

Brookings, Oregon

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Posted: 05/07/12 09:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

belairbrian wrote:

Sandia Man wrote:

Whatever RV you have will limit the amount of amperage allowed to power your rig via the main circuit breaker. If you have a 30 amp max rig you can still use the 50 amp outlet (using adapter from CW or Walmart) because your circuit breaker will only let up to 30 amps before tripping.


This assumes the overcurrent occurs after the internal 30 amp main breaker inside the power distribution center. In teh event of an overcurrent prior to the internal main the 50 amp brekaer becomes the safety. Usually this is not a problem as most overcurrent situations prior to the internal main are dead shorts and will still trip the breaker.

That said there are situations which could allow more than 30 amps to flow through the shore power cable without tripping any breaker. If this situation occurs, the issue becomes a gradual overheating of the shore power cable or the wiring between the cable and the main breaker.


x2

Often overlooked but probably never be a problem. Was looking at a Camco 50 to 30 adapter in Bi-Nart just the other day, said right on the package that a 30 amp protective device should be used upstream.

That being said, I would risk it in the rare times it would be needed for us.

CincyGus

Cincinnati

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Posted: 05/07/12 08:58am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RoyB wrote:

Most of the sites I go to are usually the 30AMP service. A few has the 50AMP service but since I don't need the 50AMP Service I never really look for that at a site.

If your trailer requires a 30AMP service then I would use a 30AMP connection as it will plug right into it. Your trailer can use the 50 AMP service and the 20 AMP service but you will need to bring along the proper adapters to be able to connect your 30A shore power able to them.

The 20AMP service will run everything in your 30A RV TRAILER but you will experience having too many appliances turned on at the same time will trip the pedstal main breaker. I dont like to trip breakers hehe...

My POPUP trailer requires the 30AMP service but I ocassionally also use their standard 120VAC 20AMP receptacle to power up my oil-filled electric heaters when it is cool. I just hookup another standard extension cord and run into the trailer throu a window flap or something. I would rather use the camp site electricity instead of using up my propane.

My POPUP trailer propane heater system is very loud for running the blower and the heat is way too much for the trailer. Runs us out of there. the portable oil-filled heaters is just prefect for us to us. I found a coupl eof low height oil-filled electric heaters that works just great in our POPUP.


X2

On those occassions I have had to use 20amp service, I just plug in my adapter and you have to monitor appliance usage. My AC will usually run as long as I am running everything I can off propane (Frig/Water Heater) and minimize heat appliances like coffee pots, crockpots, toasters, hairdryers, etc while running the ac. Anything with a heating element is generally a big draw and will pop the breaker if the A/C are on.

On 30 AMP, I usually run a 20 amp cord to a table I keep under the awning and set up the coffee pot and crockpot out there through a bar strip to take those big draw items off the trailer circuits.


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smokedummy

McLennan County Texas

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Posted: 05/08/12 08:19am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was surprised to find 50-amp ONLY on a recent visit to an RV park, but luckily my FIL (who we were camping next to) had an adapter to loan me to plug in our 30-amp TT. So now I am in the habit of asking about this when I reserve a spot. I really don't want to buy and lug around an adapter I will hardly ever use.


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belairbrian

Alabama

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Posted: 05/07/12 09:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bit Bucket wrote:

belairbrian wrote:

Sandia Man wrote:

Whatever RV you have will limit the amount of amperage allowed to power your rig via the main circuit breaker. If you have a 30 amp max rig you can still use the 50 amp outlet (using adapter from CW or Walmart) because your circuit breaker will only let up to 30 amps before tripping.


This assumes the overcurrent occurs after the internal 30 amp main breaker inside the power distribution center. In teh event of an overcurrent prior to the internal main the 50 amp brekaer becomes the safety. Usually this is not a problem as most overcurrent situations prior to the internal main are dead shorts and will still trip the breaker.

That said there are situations which could allow more than 30 amps to flow through the shore power cable without tripping any breaker. If this situation occurs, the issue becomes a gradual overheating of the shore power cable or the wiring between the cable and the main breaker.


x2

Often overlooked but probably never be a problem. Was looking at a Camco 50 to 30 adapter in Bi-Nart just the other day, said right on the package that a 30 amp protective device should be used upstream.

That being said, I would risk it in the rare times it would be needed for us.


And sometimes using a 50 to 30 amp adapter is better than using a worn out 30 amp recepticle. IMO The biggest risk is poor connections where the power cord and internal wiring meet. Often you have solid and stranded wire connected by standard household wire nuts, which can work their way loose over time.

Permanently attached 30 amp cables can also lead to water in that area as they are not truly weather tight or if pushed through the mouse hole wet.

ajwilhorn

Oronoco, MN

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Posted: 05/07/12 09:45pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So I guess I will need an adapter of some sort. Which would be the better option: 20amp to 30 amp converter or a 50amp to 30amp converter with an upstream protector? We are planning our maiden camping trip in a week and a half and unfortunately only 20amp and 50amp sites are available. Thanks.

asaber13

New York

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Posted: 05/07/12 09:52am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi, I am very new to the world of Camper camping. I just booked a reservation at a KOA that is only 50AMP sites. I have a 298bhs Sunset Creek Travel Trailer. I am concerned as to what I need to do and what the camper can handle. Apparently a lot of the KOA's around my area are converting to solely 50AMP sites for their "full hook up" sites. Pretend I am unaware of the lingo when responding please. As I said this is a new world for my family and I. We used to be tenters!TIA.

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