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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Diesel Fuel Cetane Number

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maxwell11

Hazel, KY

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Posted: 06/20/12 09:54pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I got all this good information about Diesel fuel Cetane numbers.
But, the fuel stations in my area, west KY, have no idea what the diesel fuel cetane number is of the fuel they are selling.

So having the knowledge of diesel fuel ratings is worth squat.

However, i did find out that some big diesel fuel stations offer two different cetane fuel ratings. But then you have to know the the diesel fuel cetane rating requirement of your vehicle before that informantion is of any value to you. My vehicle is a 2005 Dodge diesel pickup 5.9 engine and I have no idea its fuel cetane requirement.

Do any of you guys know the fuel requirement of the Dodge 5.9 engine?

So I kinda wasted my time requesting the informantion.

so far have not found the fuel cetane rating of the diesel at my local BP station and have made a second request for the information, guess they think I will just go away and quit bothering them, wrong. ____________________________________________

a cetane number which is too high may cause too short an ignition delay period. This changes the timing of the pressure peak, resulting in loss of power. When this happens, many of the performance problems associated with low cetane fuel will result. While the problems due to low cetane largely disappear after the engine warms up, with too high a cetane, these problems will persist even with a hot engine.

Cetane number is a measure of the ignition quality of a diesel fuel. It is often mistaken as a measure of fuel quality. Cetane number is actually a measure of a fuel's ignition delay. This is the time period between the start of injection and start of combustion (ignition) of the fuel. In a particular diesel engine, higher cetane fuels will have shorter ignition delay periods than lower cetane fuels.

There is no benefit to using a higher cetane number fuel than is specified by the engine's manufacturer. The ASTN Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils (D-975) states. "The cetane number requirements depend on engine design, size, nature of speed and load variations, and on starting and atmospheric conditions. Increase in cetane number over values actually required does not materially improve engine performance. Accordingly, the cedtane number specified should be as low as possible to insure maximum fuel availability." This quote underscores the imnportance of matching engine cetane requirements with fuel cetane number.

Diesel fuels with cetane number lower than minimum engine requirements can cause rough engine operation. They are more difficult to start, expecially in cold weather or at high altitudes. They accelerate lube oil sludge formation. Many low cetane fuels increase engine deposits resulting in more smoke, increased exhaust emissions and greater engine wear.

Most cetane improvers contain alkyl nitrates which break down readily to provide additional oxygen for better combustion. They also break down and oxidize fuel in storage. This generates organic particulates, water, and sludge - all of which degrade fuel quality. The result is often a fuel which no longer meets even minimum requirements.



"University of Idaho scientists have conducted tests to determine the timeline and percentage of degradation of stored diesel fuel #2. The results of this testing was that the petroleum diesel fuel #2 degraded 26% after 28 days of storage."

so getting fuel from a high volume station is a good idea.

This statement by BP is false as octane and cretane are not the same thing. and your engine will not benefit from having more Cretan than the mfg requires the engine to have.
"BP Ultimate Diesel is suitable for use in all diesel vehicles and in independent tests* demonstrated benefits over ordinary diesel with ongoing use. Importantly, the new fuel is guaranteed to deliver above the minimum Australian standard cetane rating. Cetane is to diesel what octane is to unleaded fuel. The minimum Australian cetane rating standard is 46. BP Ultimate Diesel has a guaranteed minimum cetane rating of 50."http://www.bp.com/genericarticle.do?categoryId=9008681&contentId=703 7038

Definition: The Cetane Number (abbreviated CN) refers to the combustion quality of diesel fuel. It represents the time delay between the start of injection process and the the point where the fuel ignites.

This value is determined by the % volume of cetane or
hexadecane (C16H34) in isocetane that provides the identical ignition delay of the measured fuel sample.

While gasoline's octane signifies its ability to resist auto-ignition (also referred to as pre-ignition, knocking, pinging, or detonation),

Using diesel fuel with a higher cetane rating than is required for a particular diesel engine design yields no bonuses. Cetane number requirements depend mainly on engine design, size, speed of operation and load variations--and to a slightly lesser extent, atmospheric conditions. Conversely, running a diesel engine on fuel with a lower than recommended cetane number can result in rough operation (noise and vibration), low power output, excessive deposits and wear, and hard starting.

Normal modern highway diesels run best with a fuel rated between 40 and 55. Following is a list cetane numbers varying grades and types of compression ignition diesel fuels:
Regular diesel--48
Premium diesel--55
Biodiesel (B100)--55
Biodiesel blend (B20)--50
Synthetic diesel--55

Old-Biscuit

Verde Valley

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Joined: 06/20/2009

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Posted: 06/20/12 11:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good info......might help in a trivial pursuit game.

The regular USLD diesel sold thru-out the USA is what you need to be running in your 5.9L CTD

Besides........cetane isn't noted at pump so what else are you going to put in the tank?


2007 RAM 3500 QC LB SRW 5.9L CTD 48re 4:10 4K in bed 'quiet genny'
2007 HitchHiker II 32.5 UKTG 2000W Xantex Inverter
Hit the Road Debt Free & Clear April '07
Came off the road still Debt Free & Clear Jan. '14


JPhelps

SE of Monkeys Eyebrow & Possum Trot

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Posted: 06/21/12 08:40am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

Cummins Fuel Recommendation:
A Cetane rating of at least 40 is recommended at temperatures above 32 degrees.
A Cetane rating of at least 45 is recommended at temperatures below 32 degrees.
http://dodgeram.org/tech/dsl/FAQ/diesel_fuel.htm

Turtle n Peeps

California

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Posted: 06/21/12 10:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gmcsmoke wrote:

remember the days when we just filled the tank up and drove.


Man I miss those days.


I'm still living them.

I drive a 06 LBZ so I don't have to carry a science lab test kit around with me. I don't need to check for H2O or Cetane or specific gravity or viscosity or anti matter or anything else for that matter.

I don't worry about EGR's or head gaskets or bed plate leak or 4.x pump failures or injector problems or front plate cavitaion errosion or plugged up oil coolers or dropped valves or any other thing.

I stick the #2 nozzel in the tank and pump until I get to around $125 bucks worth, pay the man, and go on my way.

To the rest of you, good luck.


~ Too many freaks & not enough circuses ~


"Life is not tried ~ it is merely survived ~ if you're standing
outside the fire"


gmcsmoke

Butler

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Posted: 06/21/12 04:48am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

remember the days when we just filled the tank up and drove.


Man I miss those days.

path1

Wa State (wet side)

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Joined: 04/19/2012

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Posted: 06/20/12 11:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

I got all this good information about Diesel fuel Cetane numbers.
But, the fuel stations in my area, west KY, have no idea what the diesel fuel cetane number is of the fuel they are selling.

So having the knowledge of diesel fuel ratings is worth squat.


Quote:

Do any of you guys know the fuel requirement of the Dodge 5.9 engine
Yes, a busy station that pumps a lot of fuel.

I've looked at various stations where I get fuel. All I see is a sticker that basically says that the stuff they are selling meets standards. (Like that is a help)


1990 37 ft King of the road 5th wheel. Great carpentry, summer home
1997 33 ft Holiday Rambler, Never again will a new RV come into this family
2003 25 ft Majestic M/H, Old RV rental Best travel machine we've ever owned.

jauguston

Bellingham, WA

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Posted: 06/21/12 11:41am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If the pump says #2 diesel its the right stuff. #2 diesel cetane will be higher in Winter (Winter blend) to prevent gelling in cold weather. #1 diesel is the same as kerosene,stove oil or Jet A. Most refiners make just Jet A and sell it also as stove oil, kerosene and #1 diesel. Jet A has the lowest sulphur content and they only have to have one tank for all four products. I learned this working on a turbine unlimited hydroplane crew.

Jim


2005 Coachman Sportscoach Elite 402 40'
350hp Cat C-7 w/MP-8
7500w Onan quiet diesel generator
6-Kyocera 130w solar panels SB3024i MPPT controller
Pressure Pro TPMS
1987 Suzuki Samurai tintop Toad w/VW 1.6 turbo diesel power


Kennedycamper

Algoa, Texas

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Posted: 06/21/12 10:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

X2 on filling up & driving without worrying.

APT

SE Michigan

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Posted: 06/21/12 11:15am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not many stations have 48 level Cetane. Here is a good list (end of first post I have printed out and keep in my diesel powered vehicle.

It seems trucks are not as affected by cetane level as some of these VW TDIs.


A & A parents of DD 2005, DS1 2007, DS2 2009
2011 Suburban 2500 6.0L 3.73 pulling 2011 Heartland North Trail 28BRS
2012 VW Passat TDI

Rota

right here

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Posted: 06/21/12 08:25pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To funny
This is my post From CumminsFourm
http://www.cumminsforum.com/forum/3rd-gen-powertrain/506622-diesel-fuel-related-question.html#post5238490

Nice cut and paste


maxwell11 wrote:

I got all this good information about Diesel fuel Cetane numbers.
But, the fuel stations in my area, west KY, have no idea what the diesel fuel cetane number is of the fuel they are selling.

So having the knowledge of diesel fuel ratings is worth squat.

However, i did find out that some big diesel fuel stations offer two different cetane fuel ratings. But then you have to know the the diesel fuel cetane rating requirement of your vehicle before that informantion is of any value to you. My vehicle is a 2005 Dodge diesel pickup 5.9 engine and I have no idea its fuel cetane requirement.

Do any of you guys know the fuel requirement of the Dodge 5.9 engine?

So I kinda wasted my time requesting the informantion.

so far have not found the fuel cetane rating of the diesel at my local BP station and have made a second request for the information, guess they think I will just go away and quit bothering them, wrong. ____________________________________________

a cetane number which is too high may cause too short an ignition delay period. This changes the timing of the pressure peak, resulting in loss of power. When this happens, many of the performance problems associated with low cetane fuel will result. While the problems due to low cetane largely disappear after the engine warms up, with too high a cetane, these problems will persist even with a hot engine.

Cetane number is a measure of the ignition quality of a diesel fuel. It is often mistaken as a measure of fuel quality. Cetane number is actually a measure of a fuel's ignition delay. This is the time period between the start of injection and start of combustion (ignition) of the fuel. In a particular diesel engine, higher cetane fuels will have shorter ignition delay periods than lower cetane fuels.

There is no benefit to using a higher cetane number fuel than is specified by the engine's manufacturer. The ASTN Standard Specification for Diesel Fuel Oils (D-975) states. "The cetane number requirements depend on engine design, size, nature of speed and load variations, and on starting and atmospheric conditions. Increase in cetane number over values actually required does not materially improve engine performance. Accordingly, the cedtane number specified should be as low as possible to insure maximum fuel availability." This quote underscores the imnportance of matching engine cetane requirements with fuel cetane number.

Diesel fuels with cetane number lower than minimum engine requirements can cause rough engine operation. They are more difficult to start, expecially in cold weather or at high altitudes. They accelerate lube oil sludge formation. Many low cetane fuels increase engine deposits resulting in more smoke, increased exhaust emissions and greater engine wear.

Most cetane improvers contain alkyl nitrates which break down readily to provide additional oxygen for better combustion. They also break down and oxidize fuel in storage. This generates organic particulates, water, and sludge - all of which degrade fuel quality. The result is often a fuel which no longer meets even minimum requirements.



"University of Idaho scientists have conducted tests to determine the timeline and percentage of degradation of stored diesel fuel #2. The results of this testing was that the petroleum diesel fuel #2 degraded 26% after 28 days of storage."

so getting fuel from a high volume station is a good idea.

This statement by BP is false as octane and cretane are not the same thing. and your engine will not benefit from having more Cretan than the mfg requires the engine to have.
"BP Ultimate Diesel is suitable for use in all diesel vehicles and in independent tests* demonstrated benefits over ordinary diesel with ongoing use. Importantly, the new fuel is guaranteed to deliver above the minimum Australian standard cetane rating. Cetane is to diesel what octane is to unleaded fuel. The minimum Australian cetane rating standard is 46. BP Ultimate Diesel has a guaranteed minimum cetane rating of 50."http://www.bp.com/genericarticle.do?categoryId=9008681&contentId=703 7038

Definition: The Cetane Number (abbreviated CN) refers to the combustion quality of diesel fuel. It represents the time delay between the start of injection process and the the point where the fuel ignites.

This value is determined by the % volume of cetane or
hexadecane (C16H34) in isocetane that provides the identical ignition delay of the measured fuel sample.

While gasoline's octane signifies its ability to resist auto-ignition (also referred to as pre-ignition, knocking, pinging, or detonation),

Using diesel fuel with a higher cetane rating than is required for a particular diesel engine design yields no bonuses. Cetane number requirements depend mainly on engine design, size, speed of operation and load variations--and to a slightly lesser extent, atmospheric conditions. Conversely, running a diesel engine on fuel with a lower than recommended cetane number can result in rough operation (noise and vibration), low power output, excessive deposits and wear, and hard starting.

Normal modern highway diesels run best with a fuel rated between 40 and 55. Following is a list cetane numbers varying grades and types of compression ignition diesel fuels:
Regular diesel--48
Premium diesel--55
Biodiesel (B100)--55
Biodiesel blend (B20)--50
Synthetic diesel--55


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