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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Ford V10 overheating

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Bounder Lew

Pulling the RV pin after transitting Mex to Nova S

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Posted: 07/11/12 11:04pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It is hot here in the lower mainland BC and the grades are steep.
I was overheating climbing up the Coquhala to Merrit and was convinced my fan clutch was not working (I have been told about jet engine noises when it kicks in and have not heard any over the two years I have owned and done two rad flushes with new thermostats)
So I had a new one installed and yes it was a new one from Ford and I helped the mechanic. I leave Merrit on the Okanagan Connector at 90 F and I do not hear any fan kicking in and I overheat. Have to stop twice going from 3000 ft to 5500.
When I start climbing I go out of overdrive. Then as speed goes down to 40mph I go to second gear. It will go along for a few minutes and then I see the temp guage rise, it goes up to almost red and a couple of times I start loosing power and have to stop to let cool.
I was really convinced that my problem was the fan clutch, but I am puzzled about not hearing the fan kick in even with a new one?


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Gale Hawkins

Murray, KY

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Posted: 07/11/12 11:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not sure about the v-10 sounds. Our 454 chevy sounds like a jet but the big block ford truck has a direct drive fan on the water pump so it roars off of the time.

I bet you are letting your RPM's drop below 5000 early in the climb. Next time keep shifting down when RPM's hit 4500 and keep them NO LESS than 4500 with transmission use. Our top second gear speed is 55 MPH at 4000 RPM.

Our 1992 454 TBI has a 2007 cooling system but if I let the RPM's drop below 3500 (low rpm engine compared to the V-10) the temp gauge will kiss the edge of the red zone but has never entered it. That happened on the 14% grade getting into Kingdom Come KY state park and the Old Priest Run going into Yosemite (illegal in our case because we were 2x over the weight limit).

Sounds like you are lugging the engine. It may not help on a V-10 but our 454 makes more HP on 93 octane so that is the only octane we use.

Bounder Lew

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Posted: 07/11/12 11:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RPM- I am at about 3500 Rpm at 38 Mph in the climb in second gear!
AM i going too slow??

Bounder Lew

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Posted: 07/11/12 11:36pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gale your RPMs sound too high. I am purposely gearing down to not lug the engine but I do slow down to 38MPh in second gear at about 3500 RPM for the long climbs?

Gale Hawkins

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Posted: 07/12/12 12:05am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bounder Lew wrote:

RPM- I am at about 3500 Rpm at 38 Mph in the climb in second gear!
AM i going too slow??


Shows HP of a 1998 V-10 and a 2008.

I would think 3500 should be fine for the water pump and fan but test at higher RPM's. Our gearing must be higher with the 4L80-e GM transmission. We climb at 35 MPH in 1st gear at 4,000 RPM.

At the very base or just before go to WOT and climb at WOT (wide open throttle).

The best way I found to learn how to go up a big hill is to do some WOT take off's on the level and note the shift points when you never let the gas pedal off of the floor.

Ours shifts at 4000 RPM (factory chipped) which is 35 MPH when it shifts out of 1st gear and 58 MPH when it shifts out of second. The speed when it shifts out of 3rd is top secret.

Being a four speed I down shift to 3rd by going to WOT then manually downshift to 3rd as well to insure it does not get back into OD on the climb on a less steep section of road. On interstates I have never gone lower than 2nd in a climb and that was in the Rockies for the most part and like Grapevine going south in CA.

Since our WOT shift points occur at 4,000 RPM I work the gearing so I stay between 3500 and 4000 RPM in a climb and below 4500 on the down side but more like 4000 because once going from Mount Rushmore to Rushmore Cave we experienced a computer upshift from 1st to 2nd going downhill.

Since we were near the bottom I did not get very concerned until I slowed enough for it to downshift back into 1st because I forgot to manually upshift to second after the computer did so.

RPM's were at about 3000 when in 2nd and jumped to 4000 in like 2 micro seconds. That will rattle your cage. I first thought the engine was flying apart. As a side note RPM's jump or drop by 1000 on down/up shifts in our case.

Higher RPM climbs give your engine and transmission less time to overheat and reduces your travel time in the mountains. Gassers like it hard and fast. Diesels not so much.

Gale Hawkins

Murray, KY

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Posted: 07/12/12 12:30am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bounder Lew wrote:

Gale your RPMs sound too high. I am purposely gearing down to not lug the engine but I do slow down to 38MPh in second gear at about 3500 RPM for the long climbs?


You can see per Ford you are using about 67% of your engine's ability.

Try a hill where you never let it drop below 4500 RPM if you can not stand the noise of fully winding it up.

Think about your engine and transmission over your ears. If your water pump, radiator, coolant, fan, clutch and thermostat are the correct ones and working like new and you are over heating or nearing that point you have a machine or operator problem in my experience.

It was the pull from I-90 to Mount Rushmore where I learned I had to get and keep my RPM's up near my WOT shift RPM which is a safe RPM set by the factory.

I have only drive on V-10 and that was in a van. I expect the lugging of gas motor homes is a major reason for engine and transmission failure.

Now if the speed limit going up a mountain is 35 MPH then do not go faster but you may need to be a gear lower.

Click on the 6.8 V-10 graph and you will see 3500 RPM is a sweet spot.

It is right before torque starts to drop off the clift.

Like you something is wrong if you are over heating AND loosing power at the same time. Did you get any crud out of the radiator the last time you flushed it. Did you replace the thermostat when you flushed the cooling system. With it removed you and get better flow or even back flush the block.

If the RPM does not help you must have something that needs servicing.

* This post was edited 07/12/12 12:49am by Gale Hawkins *

Bounder Lew

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Posted: 07/12/12 09:04am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the radiator hose issue. I felt the bottom hose and it feels a little soft even when cold. It is probably original for the engine!! I will get them replaced and see what happens. I did not realize that they could collapse with the high pressure.

Jerrybo66

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Posted: 07/12/12 03:18am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've never had much luck with flushes. They don't remove the hard deposits. You may have to have it rodded. How are your hoses? With a high RPM if the hoses are weak the bottom one may suck partway closed..... IMO....


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C-Leigh Racing

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Posted: 07/12/12 09:19am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On our 99 H/R, as we would climb a hill, the fan would come on & as the rpms got higher, the fan would slow down to almost nothing, but would come back on once the engine rpms went down, like it had an rpm limit it was suppose to work in.
This last trip a week ago, I guess it was hotter outside than all the other trips before & the fan would come on & as the rpms went higher the fan would work in the higher rpm ranges, where as before it didnt work & would slow down.
No trip I guess will ever be the same, but such is the life with owning an RV.
Neil

elkhornsun

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Posted: 07/12/12 12:38am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You did not mention it but I would test the radiator cap to verify it is keeping the system pressurized and check the thermostat with a pan of water and a thermometer to verify that it is opening all the way as it is supposed to do. I would also replace the radiator hoses if they are more than 3 years old. As the hoses age they can collapse as water passes through and restrict the flow through the engine block. A failing water pump may not be pushing coolant through the engine as well. If you are lucky a water pump housing may leak but it is not always the case. Lastly I would verify that the instrument gauge is providing an accurate ready. A poor electrical connection or bad sensor can give you an inaccurate reading.

90 degrees is not all that hot. That your engine overheats at slower speeds is indicative of a cooling system that is not working properly in the first place and it is most evident when you are working the engine hard and producing a lot more heat at the same time that there is the least amount of air flow from the forward motion of the truck. I used to have that problem with a 1952 Willys 4x4 that had much too small a radiator and off-road at 5 MPH the coolant temp would skyrocket even with the outside temp at 75-80 degrees.

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